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Full text of "Tatting and netting"

STCRL1 N G 
ANDFRANCINE 

CLAR1C 
AKT INSTITUTE 
L1BRART 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



PRIC E : 
FIFTY CENTS or TWO SHILLINGS. 



PUBLISHED BY 

The Butterick Publishing Co. (Limited), 
London, and New York. 



Copyright, 1895. 






"Attempt the end, and never stand to doubt; 
Nothing's so hard but search will find it out." — Herrick. 



"A thing is never too often repeated which is never 
sufficiently learned." — Seneca. 



"Say I taught thee."— Henry VIII. (Act III.) 



(ONTGNTS, 



TATTING. 
Pages 5 to 7— 

Rudiments of Tatting. 

Pages 7 to 36 — 

Kdgings and Insertions. 

Pages 36 to 56 — 

Articles of Use and Ornament. 

Pages 56 to 77— 

Doileys, Squares and Tidies. 



NETTING. 
Pages 77 to 97— 

Rudiments of Netting: Plain and Fancy Patterns in Netting. 

Pages 97 to 101 — 

Stitches and Designs for Darning Netting. 

Pages 101 to 107 — 

Fancy Designs, with Illustrated Details, for Darned or Guipure Netting, 

Pages 107 to 119 — 

Edgings, Insertions, Fringes and Scollops, Etc. 

Pages 119 to 133 — 

Doileys, Toilet Sets, Mats, Wheels, Squares, Etc. 

Pages 133 to 152— 

Articles of Use and Ornament. 



NTR0DUeTI0N, 



TATTING AND NETTING are two very popular depart- 
ments in the domain of Fancy-Work. The former is 
capable of exquisite variations in the hands of a skilled 
worker ; the latter provides not only the ornamental but the prac- 
tical and useful as well, and thus the two are harmonious com- 
panion-arts, well adapted to appear in one pamphlet. 

"Tatting and Netting" has been carefully constructed to 
meet the demand made for it, and also to round out our list of 
other Fancy-Work pamphlets, and cannot but be a valuable addi- 
tion to the literature of the Work Table. The beginner either 
in Tatting or Netting will find the rudiments of the work complete, 
the progressive stitches clearly illustrated and described, and the 
more substantial designs thoroughly reliable both as to newness 
and perfection. It will be patent to all those who look over the 
pages of Tatting and Netting that the pamphlet should have 
a conspicuous place in every lady's library of Books on Fancy- 
Work. 

THE BUTTERICK PUBLISHING CO. (limited), 
7 to i 7 West Thirteenth Street, 

New York. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



TATTING. 



Abbreviations Used in Making Tatting. 

d. s. ..Double-Stitch or the two halves forming one stitch. 

p. Pi cot. 

* Indicates a repetition as directed wherever a * is seen. 



Suggestions for Those Who Make 
Tatting. 

In making tatting much depends upon imple- 
ments and materials, and also upon the patience and 
neatness of the worker. The first requisite is a good 
shuttle. The rubber shuttles are preferable to the 
bone, ivory or silver ones, as they will be found 
more pliable, a great recommendation when the end 
of the shuttle is used instead of a pin or crochet 
needle for drawing the thread through the picots. 
When braids are employed in the work, the join- 
ing is most easily made by using the crochet needle. 
Silver shuttles soil both hands and thread. A shut- 
tle should be about two inches and a half in length, 
and as thin as possible to accomplish rapid work. 
A larger shuttle is clumsy, and a smaller one necessi- 
tates continual refilling. The shuttles of our great 
grandmothers were five or six inches in length, but 
this was then necessary, as in those days tatting was 
made of fine cord. 

An important factor in producing neat work is 
good thread — one which will draw easily and will 
not knot. A trial of the different brands in the 
market generally induces the tatting expert to de- 
cide in favor of twilled lace thread, the work being 
more easily done and the effect more lace-like. 
For trimming ordinary underwear, No. 40 will be 
found very satisfactory, while for ornamental work, 
No. 70 is best. 

To Wash Fine Tatting. 

Baste the work on a piece of clean cloth and lay 
it on the grass in the sun. Make a warm suds and 
throw over the work. If the tatting is much soiled 
this operation must be repeated three or four times, 
Before it dries, rinse by throwing over it clear water. 
and then bluing water. Allow the work to dry be- 
fore removing from the cloth; then place over it a 
thin, damp cloth and press with a hot iron. If these 
directions are carefully followed, not even an expert 
can detect that the work has been washed, as the 
thickening of the thread is imperceptible, and the 



picots retain their shape, which they will not do if 
the tatting is washed in the ordinary way. 

Modern Method of Making Tatting. 

(For Illustrations see Page 6.) 

In issuing this pamphlet we have taken it for 
granted that those who make or wish to make tat- 
ting, are acquainted with the method that has been 
so long employed, and that they would appreciate 
a more modern method, especially as by it tatting 
is more gracefully and rapidly made and with even 
less exertion than by the now old-fashioned method. 
With this idea in view, we have prepared engravings 
of the several movements required for the new 
method, showing the necessary positions of the 
hands, thread and shuttle for each detail. 

Nos. i, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. — The first movement, 
shown at No. i, is the same as that of the older 
method, the thread being wrapped around the 
fingers of the left hand to form a circle and brought 
out from under the thumb. Then the shuttle is 
grasped as seen in the picture, with the second 
ringer of the right hand between the thread and 
the shuttle. Now raise the thread with the second 
finger, as seen at figure No. 2, and slip the shuttle 
entirely under it and the circle on the left hand, 
bringing it back over the circle and under the lifted 
thread as seen at No. 3. Then, holding the shuttle- 
thread taut, form a loop of the circle-thread as 
seen at figure No. 4, drawing it down close to the 
thumb with the second finger. This forms the first 
half of the stitch. Now, to make the other half : 
Hold the shuttle the same as in the first movement, 
except that you allow the thread to drop loosely 
down as seen at figure No. 5. Pass the shuttle over 
the circle and bring it back under it as shown by 
Nos. 5 and 6 ; and then pull up another loop (the 
second half of a stitch) the same as at No. 4. This 
completes one stitch. By a little practice this me- 
thod will soon become very easy to a beginner, and 
a favorite with an expert, who will at once realize 
its advantages over the older method. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Plain Tatting and Picots. 

Nos. 7 and 8. — These engravings show how 
to make and join the rings of plain tatting. The 
method of making the stitches has been fully ex- 
plained; and picots are the long loops seen between 
the stitches of nearly all designs in tatting. 

At No. 7 the method of making picots is plainly 
illustrated, the long loop showing how two stitches 





entirely through the loop, and the thread drawn 
taut. Then five more stitches are made ; next the 
center picot ; then five more stitches, another picot 
and five more stitches. Then the circle is drawn 
down to form the ring, which is sometimes fastened 
by a knot made, something like the joining of 
picots, by picking the thread up through the con- 
necting thread of the last ring with a pin, thrusting 
the shuttle through the loop thus made and drawing 





No. 1. 



No. 2. 



No. 3. 






No 4. 



NO. 5. 



No. 6. 




No. 7. 

are divided by it in the formation of a picot. 
Sometimes picots are made between the two 
halves of one stitch ; but this is not the usual 
method; the majority of tatting-workers make 
them between two whole stitches as repre- 
sented at No. 7. 

Picots are made both for ornament and 
use. It is by them that the rings of a design 
are provided with feathery-looking edges and 
are also fastened to each other. The latter process, 
together with the plainest complete tatting design 
made, may be seen at No. 8, where a series of rings 
are joined by picots to form a simple edging. After 
the last whole ring, the picture shows the next ring 
begun. Five whole stitches are made, and then 
the circle-thread is picked up through the last 
picot of the last ring with a pin, the shuttle thrust 




Nos. 7 and 8.- 



No. 8. 

-Plain Tatting and Picots. 



the latter down into a knot at the ends of the ring. 
Plain tatting is occasionally made without picots 
and the rings are then separate from each other. 
Picots may be added in any number or groupings 
desired. Sometimes they alternate with the stitches 
across the entire top of a ring ; and sometimes but 
three are made, according to the fancy of the 
maker or the details of the design. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 




No. 9. — Tatting with Two Threads. 



attached to the second one by the method just re- 
Tatting With Two Threads. ferred to No IO shows very p i a i n i y how the 

No. 9. — Owing to numerous inquiries that have work is joined and progresses. 

Clover-Leaf Edge: Made With Two Threads. 

No. 11. — The picots in this edging are made short 
to prevent extra work when washed and ironed. 
Two threads are used, one of which is wound in the 
usual manner on a shuttle, while the other may be 
left on the spool if two shuttles (as shown in No. 9) 
are not conveniently at hand. Make the leaves thus: 
4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d, s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; 
make 2 more rings and join as shown in the engrav- 
ings; then make a ch. with both threads thus: 3 d. 
s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s. ; next work 
the 3 leaves close together as shown, and repeat. 

Tatted Insertion: Made With Two Threads. 

No. 12. — In making this insertion 2 threads are 
used. Begin with 1 thread and make a ring of 
been received as to the method of making tatting 4 d. s., then 3 p., each separated by 4 d. s., then 
with two threads, we have prepared this illustration 4 d. s., and close. Next use the 2 threads and 
as the quickest and best way of explaining the make a ch. of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s. Make another 
matter. ring like the first, but where the 1st p. would come 

In beginning, when the two threads are to be join to the corresponding p. of last ring, and so 
used close together, or, 
when the second thread is 
to be used later on, tie the 
first and second threads 
together. When the sec- 
ond thread is to be used, 
grasp its joining to the 
first closely between the 
thumb and first finger, 
carry it over the fingers 
and wrap it around the 
third or fourth finger as 
most convenient (see en- 
graving), allowing its 

shuttle to fall loosely below the hand. (It is never 
formed into a ring as is the first thread.) Now 
with the first shuttle and thread work in the ordinary 
manner, the same as though it were the first thread 
that is upon the left hand. The worker will learn 
for herself that she will not need to draw this 
thread when the required number of stitches are 
made, but will simply drop it from her hand and 
proceed with the first thread as before, taking it up 
again, as described, when the directions call for it. 

Plain Tatting Insertion. 

No. 10. — It will be seen by this engraving that 
plain tatting and plain tatting-insertion are made 
upon exactly the same plan, except that the work 
is turned with every new ring; that is, one ring 
is first made and then a second one is worked a 
short distance from it, but the two art not con- 
nected. Then the work is turned and a third ring 
is made and attached by a p. to the first one, after 
the manner illustrated at No. 8. Then the work 
is turned again and a fourth ring is made and 





No. 10. — Plain Tatting 
Insertion. 



No. 11. — Clover-Leaf Edge: 
with Two Threads. 



Made 



continue, making rings and chains until the desired 
length is obtained. Make another strip like the 
first, and join it as made by the middle p. of ring to 
the corresponding p. of ring in first strip. 

When the middle joining picots of the rings of this 






No. 12.— Tatted Insertion: Made with Two Threads. 



decoration are left quite long, the insertion may be 
used as a beading by running baby ribbon through 
the spaces, over the long picots. Very pretty yokes 
for infants garments may be made of this beading. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Tatted Pointed Edging. 

No. 13. — This trimming consists of wheels, each 
composed of 5 rings and joined to form points. 




No. 13. — Tatted Pointed Edging. 



To make a Ring. — Make 4 d. s., then 3 p. 
each separated by 4 d. s., then 4 d. s. and close; 
make 4 more rings close together like the last one, 
but join each ring after making the first 4 d. s. ; 
then after the 5 are completed, tie closely to 
form the wheels. Each point consists of 6 wheels. 
Make the lowest wheel first, then join the next 
two as shown in the picture, and finally the upper 
row of 3 wheels. 

After making as many points as desired, make a 
strip for the heading thus, using two threads: First, 
with one thread make a ring like those in the wheel, 
then with two threads make a chain of 4 d. s., 1 p., 
4 d. s. ; continue to make the rings and chains, join- 
ing each ring to the last one made by the side p.; 
then join the heading to the points as shown in the 
picture, either as it is made, or tie it on after the 
strip is completed. 

Edging of Tatting. 

No. 14. — For this edging use 2 threads, and 
work first, with one thread only, the large center ring 
(see right end of cut) as follows: 3 d. s., 16 times 
alternately 1 p., 2 d. s. ; then 3 d. s., and close in 
a ring; then turn the ring downward, and work 
with both threads, one scollop of 2 d. s. ; 7 times 
alternately 1 p., 3 d. s. ; then 1 long p., 4 d. s. ; turn 
the work, and close to this scollop, with one thread, 
work a ring of 4 d. s., 6 times alternately 1 p., and 
2 d. s. ; then 1 more p., and 4 d. s. ; turn the work 
again, and close to this, with both threads, make 1 
scollop of 2 d. s., twice alternately 1 p., and 3 d. s., 
then 1 more p., 2 d. s. ; turn the work and close to 
this, with one thread, make one ring like the one 
worked before, but instead of forming the 2nd p., 
fasten to the p. before the last of the preceding 
ring; and instead of forming the middle p. of the 
ring, fasten to the 4th p. of the large ring. Turn 
the work, and with both threads work 1 scollop like 



the one worked before; turn the work, and with one 
thread make 1 ring of 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., fasten to 
the p. before the last of the preceding ring, 2 d. s., 
1 p., 2 d. s., fasten to the 2nd following p. of the 
large ring; 2 d. s., and 4 
times alternately, 1 p., 2 d. 
s., making 4 d. s. after last 
p. Now turn the work, and 
with both threads, work 4 d. 
s. ; turn the work again, and 
close to this, with one thread 
make a ring of 2 d. s., 9 
times alternately 1 p., and 
2 d. s., and turn the work. 
Work the other half of this 
scollop in reversed succes- 
sion of rings and scollops, 
then repeat from beginning, 
joining the long scollop to 
the first one as seen in the 
engraving. 

Tatted Insertion. 

No. 15. — This insertion is 
made with 2 threads. Begin 
with the large ring as follows: 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up. Now with 
both threads, work 4 d. s. Next with shuttle thread 
work 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., draw up. Next with 
both threads work 4 d. s. Now make another 
large ring; join the two rings together with the last 
p. of the 1 st ring, and the 1st p. of the last ring. 




No. 14. — Edging of Tatting. 




No. 15. — Tatted Insertion. 



The 2nd part is made the same as the 1st, except 
that you loop the thread in the small ring of 1 picot, 
instead of making 1 picot. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



9 



Tatting and Braid Insertion. 

No. 1 6. — This insertion is very effective and 
is rapidly made, having for a foundation one of 
the fancy braids which are so largely used. 

For the Three-Leaved Figure. — Make 5 d. 
s., 2 long p., with 2 d. s. between, 2 d.s., fasten 
in p. of braid, 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., close. 

Second ring. — Working close to this ring 
make 5 d. s., fasten to p. of 1st ring, 5 d. s., 
omit three picots of the braid and fasten to 
the 4th ; 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., close. 

Third ring. — Make 5 d. S., fasten to p. of 
2nd ring, 5 d. s., omit three p. of the braid 
and fasten in 4th, 2 d. s., 2 long p., with 2 
d. s. between, 5 d. s., close. Reverse your 
work for each alternate figure. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 17. — The first row of this edging is 
worked alternately with two threads, the other 
two rows with one thread only. 

First row.—* With one thread only, work 
a ring of 5 times alternately 3 d. s., and 1 p., 
then 3d. s.; then turn the ring downward, 
and with both threads work a chain of 4 d. s., 1 
p., 4 d. s. ; turn the work up again and repeat from 
* for the length desired. 

Second row. — In order to form the points, work 
on each 3 rings of the first row 2 rings worked the 
same as the first row of rings, and join between 2 
rings by the last p. of first ring and first p. of 
following ring, and also join to each other. 

Third ro7i'. — Finally, work 1 ring on each 2 
rings of previous row, as shown by the illustration. 

Tatted Rosette-Edging. 
No. 18. — Begin at the center and make a ring of 



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No. 16. — Tatting ANT) Bratp Insertion. 




No. 17. — Tatted Kdging. 



1st ]>., then make 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. ; close, catch 
in next p., and repeat these rings until there are 12, 
catching the last one in the same p. the thread was 
first tied in. For the next round, make rings of 8 





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12 p., each separated by 3 d. s. ; close. Now, with- 
out breaking the thread, continue to make the tiny 
rings in the 1st row. First, catch the thread in the 



No. 18. — Tatted Rosette-Edging. 

p., each separated by 2 d. s., and also having 2 d. s. 
at the beginning and end. After making the 1st 
ring catch the thread in the 1st p. of ring in last 
round, then also tie it in the last p. of ring just 
made; repeat until there are 12 of these rings, 
catching the last one the same as in the last round; 
and break the thread. 

Next make the 3-ring figure at the top of wheel. 
Make 5 d. s., then make 5 p. each separated by 3 
d. s., then 5 d. s. and close. Make 2 more rings 
like last one, but instead of making the 4th p. in 
the 2nd ring, join it to the middle p. of a ring in 
the wheel; then in the 3rd ring join at the 2nd p. 
Now, for the outside row make rings the same as 
for the 2nd row of rings, joining thus: Make 1 
ring, tie in the last p. made, then tie it to the 4th p. 
of the top ring in 3-leaved figure; make another 
ring, tie it to last p. made; then tie it to 2nd p. in 
next ring; now make 2 rings, tying the 2nd one to 
the middle p. of ring in wheel, then to the last p. in 
ring just made; and after this tie each one in the 
p., after tying the ring to wheel instead of before. 
* Make 1 ring, tie to wheel, and repeat twice more 
from *; then 2 rings, tie to wheel, then 1 ring, tie 
to wheel. This brings you to the center. Work 
the other side exactly the same, making the 2 rings 
at the upper and lower part come opposite each 
other, and tie last thread to 1st ring. 

Tie each rosette to the last one made, at the 
middle p. of the 6th ring from the top. 

Make the 3-ring figures between the rosettes with 
8 d. s., then 7 p. each separated by 3 d. s., then 8 
d. s., and close; make 2 more rings like the last, and 
tie the last thread to the 1st one. Tie these figures 
to the rosettes at the 3rd ring from the top, tying 
the middle p. of each ring together. 

To make the Heading. — Make rings of 12 p. 
each separated by 2 d. s., and joined as made; 
after making the 1st ring carry the thread along, 



10 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



and fasten in the opposite p. from where it was 
drawn up. Tie heading to rosettes, tying it first in 
the 3rd p. of the top ring in 3-leaved figure; then 
tie the next ring in heading to the 5th p. of same 
ring; skip 1 ring in heading, and tie the middle p. 




No. 19. — Edging of Tatting. 

of next ring to the middle p. in the top ring of 
rosette, skip 1 ring, and repeat for rest of work. 

Edging ok Tatting. 
No. 19. — The rings of this edging are worked 




No. 20. — Tatted Insertion-Edging. 

with one thread, and the scollops with two. 
Work as follows : Make * 1 ring of 7 d. s., 
1 picot, 7 d. s.; turn the work, and with both 
threads work 1 scollop of 3 d. s., and 5 p., each 
separated by 2 d. s.; then 3 d. s., turn the work 
again and work 2 rings like the preceding, but 
instead of forming the p. in the first of these rings, 
join to the p. of the ring already finished ; turn the 
work, make 1 scollop like the preceding, turn, 
make 2 rings and 1 scollop like the preceding; 
turn, make 1 ring of 7 d. s., join to the p. of the 
preceding ring; 7 d. s., turn, make twice alter- 
nately, 1 scollop and 1 ring like the preceding ones; 
join the rings to the same p. to which the preceding 
ring was joined, so that a figure of 4 connected 
rings is formed. Now complete the next 2 figures, 
to correspond. After turning the work, make for 
the upper edge of the edging 1 scollop of 3 d. s., 
and 3 p. each separated by 2 d. s., then 3 d. s.; turn 
again and repeat from *, but join the next 3 scol- 
lops, instead of forming the middle p., to the cor- 
responding p. of the 3 scollops last worked. 

Tatted Insertion-Edging. 

No. 20. — First ring {on upper edge). — Make 4 
d. s., 1 picot, 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s. 
Second ring {the large one). — * Make a ring of 9 



p., with 2 d. s. between each, and 3 d. s. before the 
first and after the last p.; turn. 

Third ring. — 4 d. s., catch in last p. of 1st ring, 
4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s. ; turn. 

Fourth ring {the small ring). — 3 d. s., catch in 
the last p. of the large ring, 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 
p., 3d. s. ; turn. 

Fifth ring. — 4 d. s., catch in last p. of 3rd ring, 

4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s. ; turn. Repeat from 
*, joining the first p. to last p. of small ring. Draw 
each ring up close, leaving a short thread between. 

Tatted Insertion and Edging. 

Nos. 21 and 22.— These two designs are made 
of silk, although cotton may be used, if preferred. 
Both are composed of rings and figures and are 
made with 2 threads. 

For a Figure. — Begin with the shuttle silk and 
make a ring of 5 d. s., then 8 p., each separated by 

5 d. s., and draw up. * Now take the 2 threads and 
make 7 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 
p., 7 d. s., skip 1 p. in the ring (the first picot made), 
and tie in the next p., and repeat 3 times more 
from *. Make each ring the same as the ring in the 
figures, and tie together after all are made. 

The insertion consists of the figures and rings 
tied together alternately, the rings each being tied 




No. 21. — Tatted Insertion. 

by 2 p. with 1 p. between, to the 1st and last p. of 
2 chs. in the figure (see picture). 

The upper part of the edging is arranged like the 
insertion, with a figure tied to the chains of 2 
figures below each ring (see picture). 

To make the Heading. — Tie the 2 threads in 




No. 22. — Tatted Edging. 

the 1 st of the 2 p. on top, then make 2 d. s., tie in 
next p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., tie in next p., 2 d. s., 
tie in next p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. s., 1 p., 
5 d. s., and repeat from beginning. The insertion 
may, when made of silk, be used as a passemen- 
terie, and the same is true of the edging. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



11 



Tatted Edging. 

No. 23. — Work with 2 threads and make a ch. of 
5 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. ; then with 1 thread, 
1 ring of 6 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., draw up ; 
with 2 threads make 1 d. s.; then with 1 thread 
again make 7 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., and 
draw up; with 2 threads make another ch. of 5 d. 
v, 1 p., 2 d. s. ; with 1 thread a ring of 3 d. s., join 
to list ring, then 3 d. s. ; 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s.; 1 ch. with 2 threads ; then, 
with 1 thread make another ring like the last, except 
that there are 5 p. each separated by 2 d. s., instead 
of only 3 ; 1 ch., another ring like the one before 
the last, then a ch. of 2 d. s. ; join to p. of opposite 
ch.; 5 d. s., then a ring of 3 d. s., join to last ring, 
4 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s.; 1 ch., another ring of 7 d. s., 1 
p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. ; then a ch. of 6 d. s.; join to 
opposite p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., fasten neatly to the 
ring just below the p. (see picture); join the 2nd 
point to the p. of the last 2 rings, and work in this 
way until the strip is as long as desired. Fasten 
the loose threads of the 1st ch. made to the 1st p. 
in 1st ring to correspond with the last ch. 

For the Heading. — Crochet a ch. of 5, catch 



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No. 23 —Tatted Edging. 

in the 1st p., 5 ch., catch in the next, and repeat 
across the work. 

Tatted Insertion. 

No. 24. — This insertion has for its center a 
piece of lace beading through which narrow rib- 
bon can be run, and is especially adapted for the 
ends of bureau-scarfs and other decoration where 




No. 24. — Tatted Insertion. 

a fine, and at the same time rapidly made trim- 
ming is required. 

Begin with the large ring. Make 5 d. s., 1 p., * 
3 d. s., 5 p., with 1 d. s. between, 3 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. 
s., draw up. Working close to this ring make 6 d. s., 
fasten to end thread, 6 d. s., fasten to beading, 6 d. 
s., draw up. Second large ring: 5 d. s., fasten to 



last p. of large ring ; repeat work from *. Reverse 
the work for the lower side. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 25. — This pretty, easily made edging is 
worked in 3 rows, with 1 and with 2 threads alter- 



FSJK 



jr /A 1 



9 £ % *k '■ 



No. 25. — Tatted Edging. 

nately used. For the first row work as follows: 

First row. — With one thread only make a ring of 
6 d. s„ 1 p., 6 d. s. ; draw the stitches together; * 
turn the work upside down, and with both threads 




No. 26. — Narrow Tatted Edging. 

work a scollop of 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. ; turn the work, 
and with one thread work 2 rings like the preced- 
ing one, but fasten the 1st ring to the ring worked 
previously. Repeat from *. 

Second row. — With one thread work a ring of 6 d. 
s. ; fasten to the joining p. of the 1st 2 rings in the 
preceding row; 6 d. s.; turn the work, * and with 
both threads work a scollop of 6 d. s. ; make 1 p., 
6 d. s. ; turn the work, and with one thread make 2 
rings like the preceding, joining the 1st to the same 
joining-picot of the preceding, and the 2nd ring to 
the next joining-picot; turn the work, and repeat 
from *. 

Third row. — Always alternately with one and two 
threads, make first a ring of 6 d. s. ; fasten to the 
1st scollop of the preceding row, 6 d. s. ; draw the 
stitches together, turn the work, and with both 
threads work * a scollop of 2 d. s., 7 p., each sep- 
arated by 2 d. s.; finally 2 d. s. ; turn the work; 
make 1 ring like the preceding, joining to the next 
scollop; turn the work, and repeat from *. 

Crochet along the upper edge 1 s. c. in the p. of 
each scollop with 5 chain between. 

Narrow Tatted Edging. 

No. 26. — This edging is made with 2 threads. 
Begin with the shuttle thread thus: Make a ring of 
6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., close. 
Now take the 2nd thread and with the 2 make 



12 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



a ch. of 10 d. s., i p., 10 d. s. ; make another ring 
like the last i, joining it to the side p. of the ist 
ring after making the ist 6 d. s. ; then another ch. 




No. 27. — Wide Tatted Lace. 



Now make another ring, but instead of joining it 
to the side p. of the last i, join it to the center 
p. after making the 2nd 6 d. s. ; now make another 
ch., then another ring, joining this one to the side 
p. of the last ring, and to the center p. of the ist 
ring made. Now make another ch. thus : 3 d. s., 
then 4 p., each separated by 3 d. s., then 3 d. s., and 
repeat from the beginning for all the work, joining 
the ist ch. to the last one instead of making the p. 

Wide Tatted Lace. 

No. 27. — This is a very handsome edging, and 
not difficult to make. One thread 
alone is used throughout the work. 

Begin with the center ring and 
work 1 d. s., 12 p. each separated 
by 2 d. s., then 1 d. s., draw the 
stitches together and fasten the 
thread in ist p. ; * 4 d. s., 5 p., each 
separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s.; 
draw the stitches up and fasten 
thread to next p. of middle ring; 
repeat from * all around, but in- 
stead of forming ist p. of each 
ring, join to last p. of preceding 
ring; and in working the last ring, 
instead of forming last p. join to 
ist p. of the ist ring worked. 
This completes a wheel. Work 
as many wheels as desired, joining 
them to each other as made by the 
middle p. of 2 consecutive rings. 

To form the Points. — Join a wheel between the 
ist and 2nd wheels by 4 consecutive rings, 2 to ist 
wheel just below the joining, and 2 to next wheel; 



join another between 3rd and 4th wheels and so 

continue all across. 

To work the Insertion. — 4 d. s., 5 p., each sepa- 
rated by 2 d. s., then 4 d. s., draw the stitches 
together, turn the ring downward, leave a short 
space of thread and work another ring like the 
ist; * turn again, leave a short space of thread 
and work another similar ring, but instead of 
forming ist p., join to last p. of ist ring. Repeat 
from * all across, but fasten in working, to the 
row of wheels already worked, joining by the 
middle p. of 2 consecutive rings to 2 upper rings 
of each wheel, and having 3 rings in each space 
between wheels. Now work another row of wheels, 
joining them to the upper rings of the insertion 
just opposite the wheels of lower row. Then 
another row of insertion, joining to the upper 
rings of the wheels as shown by the illustration. 

Tatted Lace. 

No. 28. — This very pretty lace is quickly made, 
being worked throughout with one thread only. 
It may, however, be worked with silk, linen or 
cotton thread, as preferred. 

Begin in the center and work 1 d. s., 12 p., each 

separated by 2 d. s., then 1 d. s., and draw the 

stitches together; leave a short space of thread 

and work 7 d. s., join to ist p. of the ring just made, 

7 d. s., draw the stitches together; * leave a short 

space of thread and work a large ring of 5 d. s. and 

7 p., each separated by 2 d. s. ; then 5 d. s. and draw 

up; turn the work and leaving the space of thread 

work a small ring as before, joining to the next p. 

of the center ring; turn the work and repeat from 

* all round, but instead of forming ist p. of each 

large ring, join to last p. of previous ring; and after 

completing the round, instead of forming last p. of 

the large ring, join to the ist ring made. 

Work a strip of the rosettes as long as desired, 
joining them to each other in working. After com- 
pleting the strip, to make the point, place a rosette 




No. 28. — Tatted Lace. 

between the ist two rosettes, joining to each, as 
shown by the illustration, between the 2nd and 3rd 
rosettes. Work a three-leaved figure and join to the 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



L8 



rosettes, each section of the figure made like the large 
rings of the rosettes; then between the 3rd and 4th 
rosettes, make a rosette for the point ; continue across. 
To Form the Heading. — Work rings like those of 
the rosettes, joining to the 3 upper 
rings of each rosette, making 2 rings 
between each without joining. Be 
careful to leave enough thread between 
the rings to keep the edge straight. 

Tatting and Crochet Edge. 

No. 29. — This edge may be made 
with thread in numbers ranging from 
40 to 60. 

To work the Rosettes. — Work a 
ring of 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p.; 
repeat until you have 12 p. with 3 d. 
s. between each p.; close up the 
stitches. * Leave a short space of 
thread, make 3 d. s., join to 1st p. of 
the center ring, make 3 d. s., close up 
the stitches. Leave a short space of 
thread, then make 2 d. s., 1 p., 14 d. 
s., 1 p., 2 d. s.; close up the stitches. 
Repeat from * until all the p. around 
the center ring are filled. This makes 
a rosette; join the rosettes while making, or they 
can be joined with needle and thread after they 
are made. 

The second row consists of a half-rosette and 3- 
leaved figures, the latter being made as follows: 2 
d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p„ 6 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s.; close up the 
stitches. Make 2 d. s., join to the last p. of the pre- 
vious leaf; make 10 d. s., 1 p., 10 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. ; 
close up stitches; make 2 d. s., join to the last p. of 
last leaf; make 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., close 
up stitches and fasten all 3 leaves together with a 
knot. Leave 2 inches of thread for one thread of 
stem. Make 4 of these 3-leaved figures. With a 
crochet needle make a chain of 27 stitches, then 
make 1 d. c. in each stitch of chain. Baste the 
rosettes on a stiff piece of paper, and fasten the 



button-hole stitch over the stem ; baste the 3-leaved 
figures on the paper and make stems in the same 
way; join all the stems together near the end of the 
main stem. Make alternate rows of the rosettes 





No. 29.— Tatttn-g akd Crochet Kdge. 

crochet to the rosettes with needle and thread. 
Then baste the half rosette on the paper and fasten 
to the crocheted strip ; with needle and thread 
make a stem of 3 threads to the half-rosette and 



No. 30. — Tatted Lace. 

and the 3-leaved figures, separated by the strip. 
Finish the upper edge with a crocheted strip. 

Tatted Lace. 

No. 30. — This pretty lace is made with 2 threads. 
Begin thus: With the shuttle make a ring of 5 
d. s., then 5 p. each separated by 3 d. s., then 5 d. 
s. and close. Now with the 2 threads, make a ch. 
of 5 d. s., 5 p., each separated by 3 d. s., then 5 d. 
s,; make another ring like the last one, but join it 
to the corresponding p. of last ring after making 
the first 5 d. s. Continue the rings and chs. until 
there are 15 rings; then break the thread and tie 
neatly at each end. Now make each of the 4-leaved 
figures as follows: 8 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. s., 
1 p., 8 d. s., and draw up; close to the last one 
make another ring, then 2 more, and tie the last one 
close to the first one of the 4 by the 2 threads, to 
preserve the shape. Make another figure like the 
last one, and join it to the first figure by the middle 
p. of one of the rings (see picture). Now tie the 
middle p. of the ring opposite the tying to the 
middle p. of the center-ring in the strip first 
made; skip 2 rings, tie to the middle p. of next 
ring at each side, then skip 2 more rings, and 
tie the next figure in the same way (see pic- 
ture). Make as many scollops as desired and 
tie together by 4 chs., tying at the middle p. in 
each chain. 

For the Heading. — Make the same as the first 
strip, tying it to the scollops as seen in the pic- 
ture; then make a row of the 4-leaved figures, 
tying to the first row, and finish with a ch. made 
of the 2 threads thus: Tie in a p. at the top, 
make 3 d. s., then * 6 p., each separated by 3 d. s., 
then 3 d. s.; join to p. in ring underneath, 1 d. 
s., and repeat from *. If the work seems to draw, 
make another p. and 3 d. s. between each joining. 



14 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Design for Tatting. 
No. 31. — The design illustrated may be used for 




No. 31. — Design for Tatting. 

edging, insertion, flouncing, scarfs, collars, cuffs, 
handkerchiefs or any article for which tatting is 
pretty and suitable. 

The wheels are made separately and joined as 
seen in the engraving; and each row of circles or 
rings in every wheel is also made sep- 
arately, and the rows are then united 
with a needle and thread. 

The inner row consists of 14 tiny rings 
about an eighth of an inch apart, each 
formed of 6 d. s. separated at the middle 
(between the 3rd and 4th stitches) by a 
very long p. (see engraving). The 14 
rings are joined in a circle, and the cen- 
ter is filled in with two rows of twisted 
rick-rack stitch as seen in the engraving, 
the first row being taken through the 
lower centers of the tiny rings. The 
next row is taken through the loops 
formed by the first row, and then the 
thread is carried around each of these 
loops to draw the work into a ring. 

The second row consists of 14 rings a 
little less than one-fourth of an inch 
apart, each ring being formed of 6 d. s. alternating 
with 5 long p. In joining this row to the center or 
inner row, the needle and thread are passed through 



the lower centers of these rings and through the 
very long p. of the inner row at the same time, and 
a sort of button-hole or knot stitch is made; then 
the thread passes along back of the work 
and knots the lower p. of the adjoining 
rings together, and so on around the circle. 
The outer row consists of 14 rings about 
one-fourth of an inch apart, and each 
formed of n d. s. and 10 p.; and this row 
is joined to the second row, the same as 
the latter is joined to the inner row. 

The small figures joining the wheels are 
composed of rings each made of 7 d. s., 1 
lon g P-, 3 d. s., 1 long p.,3 d. s., 1 long p. and 
7 d. s. The rings are made close together 
and then tied into the shape illustrated. 
They are then tied at their p. to those of 
the wheels as seen in the engraving, and 
the wheels themselves are also knotted 
together at their p. 

An expert might join the wheels and fig- 
ures while making the work, by the regular 
method of joining circles by their p.; but 
unless one is skilled in this variety of work, 
it will be well to follow the instructions 
herein given; but in tying the knots great 
care must be exercised to make them firmly 
so that they will not slip when the ends of 
the thread are cut off; and while these ends 
must be cut off closely enough to prevent 
a ragged effect, they must not be cut so 
closely as to be likely to slip. 

Tatted Lace. 

No. 32. — Take a piece of lace braid and 

work with the double thread a row of 

chains, each composed as follows: 10 d. 

s., 1 p., 10 d. s. ; attach to the braid at intervals of 

three-eighths of an inch. The 2nd and 3rd rows 

are worked in the same manner, but are joined to 

the picots of the previous rows instead of the braid. 

The center ring of the wheels consists of 8 p., 




No. 32 — Tatted Lace. 



with 3 d. s. between; draw up, pass the thread through 
the 1st. p., and make 5 d. s., 1 p., * 3 d. s., 5 p., 
with 1 d. s. between each, 3 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. ; 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



15 



draw up, pass thread through next p. of center ring, 
make 5 d. s., join to last p. of 1st ring; repeat 
from *. Continue till the wheel is complete, having 
attached it to the upper por- 
tion of your edging as shown 
in the illustration. 



Tatted Trimming. 

No. 33. — This very dainty 
edging, with an insertion 
above separated by a nar- 
row strip of linen, is suitable 
for trimming underwear and 
is made with 2 threads. 

To make the Upper Pari 
or Insertion. — Begin by mak- 
ing a ring with 1 thread 
thus: 4 d. s., then 5 p., each 
separated by 3 d. s., 4 d. s., 
and draw up; now take the 
2nd thread, and with the 2 
threads make a ch. of 8 d 
s., * then another ring like 
the last one, except that you 
join it to the last p. of last 

ring after making the 4 d. s.; then begin again with 
the 2 threads and make one half-stitch, 1 p., then 8 
d. s., and repeat from * until the desired length is 
made. 

Next, use 1 thread first, and make a ring like 
those first made, but join it to the p. in the ch. 
where the middle p. of the ring would come; then 
make a ch. with the 2 threads of 7 d. s., then another 



to the center ring where every other p. 
would come. 

Next make the lower part or edging. 



in the ch. 
Make the 





No. 33. — Tatted Trimming. 



ring, then another ch., then another ring, but join 
this ring to the 3rd p. (secpicture), and continue in 
this way across the strip first made. 

Next row. — Make a strip like first one, but join it 



No. 34. — Tatted Wheei^Lace. 



double row of rings thus: With 1 thread make a 
ring of 4 d. s., 5 p. each separated l>y 4 d. s., then 
4 d. s. and draw up; make a ch. of 9 d. s. with 
the 2 threads, * then another ring joined to the 
last one after making the first 4 d. s., 1 p., another 
ch., and repeat from *. Next make another strip 
like the last, but join it to every p. in the ch., 
instead of making the p. (see picture.) 

For the Lower Edge. — * Make a ring of 4 d. s., 
3 p., each separated by 3 d. s., join to middle p. of 
ring of heading, 3 d. s., 3 p., each separated by 3 
d. s. ; then 4 d. s. and close. Now with the 2 
threads make a ch. of 12 d. s., then another ring 
with 5 d. s., 7 p., each separated by 4 d. s., 5 d. s. 
and close; make another ch. of 12 d. s., and repeat 
from *, but in joining the rings to the heading skip 
1 ring, thus joining to every other ring. 

Tatted Wheel-Lace. 

No. 34. — Lace beading is used for the heading 
of this lace, which consists of wheels arranged as 
shown in the picture. The spaces are filled in 
with lace stitches or those similar to the ones used 
in drawn work (see picture). 

To make a Wheel. — Make a ring of 3 d. s., then 
ri p., each separated by 3 d. s., and close. 

For the outer row. — Make 3 d. s., catch in a p. of 
ring, 3 d. s., and draw up; then at a little distance 
from the tiny ring make a large ring of 2 d. s., 9 
long p., each separated by 2 d. s., 2 d. s., and close. 
Make a knot to hold the ring close, then continue to 
make tiny and large rings alternately, but join the 
large rings to each other where the second picot 
would come. Any style of lace braid may be used 
for the heading. 

This lace, when made of very fine thread forms 
an exquisitely dainty border for a handkerchief. 



16 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Tatted Edging. 

No. 35. — This edging consists of large wheels 
and small figures, which are all made separately, 
and then tied together as seen in the illustration. 
First make as many large wheels as the length of 
the t r i m- 
ming desir- 
ed calls for. 

For the 
Wheel.— 
Make 2d. 
s., then 12 
long p. each 
separated 
by 2 d. s.; 
drawupand 
break the 
thread. 
Now make 
a tiny ring 
of 6 d. s., 
catch in a 
p. of center 
ring, 6 d. s., 
and close. 
Turn the 
work, and 
make a 
large ring, 

a short distance from the last one, of 5 d. s., 1 
p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., then 5 p. each separated 
by 2 d. s., 3 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., and close; repeat 




these two rings until there are 12 of each, and join 
the second large ring to the first one after making 
the 5 d. s., at the corresponding p.; and also in 
making the last ring, join it to the corresponding p. 
of the first ring instead of making the last p.; then 
tie the two threads left neatly together to finish the 
wheel. 

To make the Figure at the Lower Edge. — Make 
a ring of 4 d. s., then 8 p. each separated by 4 d. s., 
and close. Now take the other thread, and with 
the two make a chain 
of 5 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. 
s., then 4 p. each 
separated by 3 d. s., 
5 d. s., and tie to 
the second p. made 
in a ring; repeat the 
chains 3 times more, 
skipping one p. be- 
tween each tying; 
and after the last 
chain is tied to the 

p., tie the 4 threads Na 36.-Tatted Edging, 

together and cut as 
close as possible. 

Now tie the wheels together at the middle p. of 
2 rings, and then tie the small figures to the wheels 
as seen in the picture, leaving 2 rings free in each 
wheel between each figure, and 1 p. free in the 
figure, between the tying. 

For the Heading. — Make 4 d. s., then 7 p. 



each separated by 4 d. s., then 4 d. s., and close; 
carry the thread along the back and tie in the 
center p.; now make another ring like the last, 
tie in the same p., and repeat for all the rings. Tie 
this to the large wheels, leaving 2 rings free between 
each wheel, and tying the middle p. of 2 rings of 

the heading 
to the mid- 
dle p. of 2 
rings in the 
wheels (see 
pic t u re). 
Now take 
the second 
thread and 
tie to the 
middle p. of 
thefirst ring 
in head- 
ing; then 
with both 
threads 
make a 
chain of 7 
d. s., 1 p., 
7 d. s., and 
tie to mid- 
dle p. of 
next ring, 
and repeat 
work. Make the picots all long. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 36. — In making this edging the picots around 
the rings are made double the ordinary length. 

First ring. — 5 d. s., then 5 p. with 5 d. s. between 
each, 5 d. s., close. Work at the bottom of ring, 



No. 35. — Tatted Edging. 



for all the 




using double thread, 5 d. s., 2 long p. with 5 d. s. 
between each, then 5 d. s. The second ring, at- 
tached to 1st p. of large ring, consists of 5 d. s. 
made four times, and separated each time by 3 p. ; 
then draw up. With double thread, work 5 d. s., 
then 2 p. with 5 d. s. between each, then 5 d. s. 

Repeat from r st ring. 

For the Edge, 

working with double 

thread from 1st picot 

in large ring. — * 1 

d. s., then four picots 

with 2 d. s. between 

each, then 1 d. s., 

join to middle p. of 

large ring, 1 d.s.,4p. 

with 2 d. s. between 

each, then r d. s.; 

join to 3rd p. of large 

ring, 5 d. s., join to 

p. of small ring, 5 d. 

s,, join to the 1st p. of large ring. Repeat from *. 

The object of the long p. is to produce that 

feathery effect which so enhances the beauty of 

tatting, especially where the latter is made of fine 

thread. The fineness of the thread selected is a 

matter of individual taste. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



17 




Tattkd Insertion. 

No. 37. — This insertion consists of two styles of 
wheels. The wheel having the square at the renter 
is made with 2 threads. The first wheel at the 
right hand is made thus: Make a ring of 8 d. s., 

1 p., 8 d. s., 1 p., 8 
d. s., 1 p., Sd. s. and 
draw up; now take 
the 2 threads and 
make a ch. of 9 d. 
s., and repeat 3 times 
more; then end with 
a ch. of 9 d. s. and 
tie to the 1st thread 
to form the square 
center. Now tie the 

2 threads to the cen- 
ter p. of a ring, and 

* make a ch. of 6 d. 
s. ; then with 1 thread 

make a ring of 3 d. s., then 5 p., each separated by 

3 d. s., then 3 d. s. and close. Now make another 
ch. of 6 d. s. hnd tie in the side p. of same ring, a 
ch. of 6 d. s., tie in the side p. of opposite ring, 1 
ch. of 6 d. 3., a ring like the last one, 1 ch. of 6 d. s., 
tie in the middle p., and repeat from *, tying the 
last ch. to the first one where it started (see picture). 
This completes the first wheel. To make the second 
wheel, use only 1 thread. First make a ring of 3 
d. s., then 8 p. each separated by 3 d. s.; draw up 
and tie closely, then break the thread. Next make 
a tiny ring of 7 d. s., join to a p. of center ring, 7 
d. s., and close. Turn the work and at a little 
distance from the last 

ring make a ring of 3 
d. s., then 7 p. each 
separated by 3 d. s., 
then 3 d. s. and close; 
make another tiny ring, 
then a large ring like 
the last, except that you 
make 9 p. instead of 7 
and join at the 2nd p.; 
then repeat from the 
beginning of round, 
and tie the last 2 rings 
together to correspond 
with the others. Tie 
the wheels together as 
shown in the picture. 
Crochet an edge at the 
top and bottom thus: 
Tie the thread in the 
middle p. of a wheel, 

* make n ch., skip 1 
ring, 1 tr. c. in the 2nd 
p. from joining of next 

ring, 1 tr. c. in the 1st p. of ring in next wheel (see 
picture), n ch., 1 s. c. in 3rd p. of next ring, 5 ch., 
1 s. c. in 3rd p. of next ring, 1 1 ch., 1 tr. c. in each of 
tne p. of the joining, the same as before, 1 1 ch., 1 s. c. 
in the middle p. of middle ring, and repeat from *. 
Next row. — D. c. with 2 ch. between in every 3rd 



Stitch. Final row, 
between. 



work in every space, with 2 chs. 



No. 37. — Tatted Insertion 




Design in Tatting. 

No. 38. — This edging is composed of 2 sets of 
wheels joined to tiny 4-leaved figures with a needle 

and thread. The 
upper edge is formed 
by a single row of 
rings, and similar 
single rings between 
the wheels. 

To make the upper 
row of Wheels. — 
Make each wheel as 
follows: For the 
center make 13 d. 
s. alternating with 
12 long p., and close 
in a ring. 

Now begin a tiny 
ring by 3 d. s., catch to the 1st p. of the ring just 
made; 3 d. s. and close the ring. Turn the work, 
make 4 d. s., 7 p. each separated by 1 d. s., then 4 
d. s. Turn and make another small ring, joining it 
to the next p.; then a large ring, but instead of 
making the 1st p., join it to the last p. of the adjoin- 
ing large ring. Repeat in this manner around the 
center, fastening the last ring to the one first made. 
To make the Rick-Rack Wheels. — Make 8 rings, 
each as follows: 5 d. s., 9 p. each separated by 1 d. s., 
then 5 d. s., joining the rings by their lower p. as made. 
Now fill in the center by a long many-twisted rick- 
rack stitch drawn nearly together at the center by 

a single thread. 

To make the Small 
Figures. — Make each 
ring of 4 d. s., 1 long 
p., 2 d. s., 1 long p., 2 
d. s., 1 long p., 4 d. s. 
Arrange and tie to form 
the 4-leaved effect. 

To make the Bead- 
ing. — Each ring is 
formed of 10 d. s. each 
separated by a p. 

When all the parts 
are made, knot them 
together with a needle 
and thread as seen 



in 
To 
in- 

the 



No. 3S. — Design in Tattixg. 



the engraving, 
form the design 
tended, arrange 
wheels as follows: 

First ro7c. — All ring- 
wheels. 

Second row. — Single 
ring-wheels alternating 

3 rick-rack wheels. 

-Alternating ring and rick-rack 



with groups of 

Third row. 
wheels. 

Fourth row. — Single rick-rack w r heels, alternating 
with groups of 3 ring-wheels. This arrangement will 
produce a pointed outline with the rick-rack wheels. 



18 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



tti^i^is^^M-, 1 


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WW 










5^^^^%fi>TS 1' fit** 


trii 

fp 




is 

n 




F?&*£l 














fc^S^XW**^'.! 3 la--' 



No. 39. — Design in Tatting. 



Design in Tatting, with Detail. 

Nos. 39 and 40. — This edging is very dainty 
and not difficult to make. All the rings are made 
in separate rows and sewed together to form the 
olive-shaped ornaments composing the design. No. 
40 shows the ornaments for the lower edge in full size. 

To make the inner row of Rings. — For each 
upper and lower ring: Make 4 d. s., 1 long p., 3 d. 
s., 1 long p., 4 d. s., 1 long p., 4 d. s. and close. 

For each of the 6 remaining Rings.— $ d. s., 1 
long p., 2 d. s., 1 long p., 2 d. s., 1 long p., 3 d. s. 
and close. Join the ends and fill in the center with 
a twisted rick-rack stitch, as seen in the engraving. 

For the next row. — Make each ring as follows : 
8 d. s., with 1 p. between each, making 7 p. in all. 

For the Outer row. — Make each ring as follows : 
10 d. s., with 1 p. between each, making 9 p. in all. 

Now join the second row to the inner row, and 
the outer row to the second row with a needle and 
thread as follows : Catch the rows to the middle p. 
of the rings underneath, and also fasten together 
the adjoining p. of the rings of each row as seen in 
the engraving. 

To form the lower edge of the design seen at 
No. 39, knot the ornaments together through their 
picots as seen in the engravings. 

No. 40 shows the ornaments as used alone for 
the edging, with a single row of rings as the head- 
ing. Each ring is formed of 10 d. s., with 1 p. 
between each. The rings in the three-leaved figure 
are each formed of 9 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 9 d. s. 

With a needle and thread join the three-leaved 
figures and the heading, knotting the picots of the 
heading as seen in the engraving. 

No. 39 shows the ornaments of No. 40 joined 



to form a lower edge to a very wide design, and 
united to a second row of wheels arranged between 
two rows of beading, or simple insertion. These 
wheels are each made as follows: 

First row of Rings. — Each of the 12 rings is 
made of 3 d. s., 1 long p., 1 d. s., 1 long p., 1 d. 
s., 1 long p., 3 d. s. The rings are joined and 
filled in with a twisted rick-rack stitch. 

The Outer r<nu of Rings. — Each ring is formed 
of 10 d. s., each separated by 1 p., thus making 9 p. 
The rings are joined to the middle p. of the rings 
of the 1st row, and their adjoining p. are also join- 
ed together, the same as in the lower ornaments. 

The wheels are joined to each other by knot- 
ting at the middle loops, 8 corresponding p.; and 
an extra ring, made with 11 d. s. and 10 p., is 
knotted to them above and below each joining, 
and to the beading. (See engraving.) 

To make the Beading. — Each row is made as 
follows: 1 large ring (like outer row); turn, 1 
small one as follows: 3 d. s., 1 long p., 3 d. s., 1 
long p., 3 d. s., 1 long p., 3 d. s. ; turn again, make 
another small ring, but instead of making the 1st 
p., catch it to the 2nd p. of the large ring; turn, 




No. 40. — Detail of Design in Tatting. 

make another large ring, but instead of at the second 
p., catch it to the p. of the small ring; turn, make 
another large ring, catching the same as the ring 
just made. Repeat these details to the end of work. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



19 



Knot the beading to the wheels and ornaments, 
as seen in the engraving. In making the knots be 
\rrv careful to tie them firmly so that they will not 
slip when the ends are cut off. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 41. — Begin by making a ring of 8 d. s., 4 p. 
each separated by4d.s., Sd. 
s., and close; make 3 more 
rings like these close to each 
other, then tie the 2 ends of 
the work to form a 4-leaved 
figure, and cut the thread. 
Next, tie the thread in the 
2nd of the 4 p., and make a 
ring of 6 d. s., then 5 p. each 
separated by 3 d. s., 6 d. s., 
and close. Tie in the next 
p.; then, for the corner ring: 
make 6 d. s., join to last ring 
at the side p., 3 d. s., 6 p. each 
separated by 3 d. s., 6 d. s., 
and close; tie in the next p. 
of ring in figure; now make 
a ring like the first one, join- 
ing it at the side p. to the last 
ring; then tie in the next p. 
of same center-ring and also in the first p. of next 
ring; then make another ring like the last; tie in 
next p., then in the corner ring, and repeat for the 
other three sides. 

For the Heading. — Make 4 rings close together 
thus: Make 8 d. s., then 3 p. each separated by 3 
d. s., 8 d. s., and close; tie after making the last 
one, so as to make the 4-leaved figure. Make a 
strip of these, joining by a p. of 1 ring (see picture); 
then tie to the squares which are tied together by 1 
p. of 1 ring, as shown in the picture. 

Crochet a heading of 1 s. c. in middle p. of 1st 
rm g> * 5 cn -> 2 d. c, keeping the last loop of the 



single, and double crochets underneath, and in the 
middle stitch of 5-ch. 

Next row. — 1). £. with 2 ch. between in every 

'-pace. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 42. — This edge may be made with thread in 




No. 41.— Tatted Bdgino. 

1st one on the needle in working off, until the 
2nd one is picked up in the space between the 
figures; 5 ch., 1 s. c. in the middle p., and repeat 
from *. 

Next rou: — I), c. with 2 ch. between over the 



No. 42. — Tatted Edging. 

numbers ranging from 40 to 60. Make with 2 threads. 
To make a Leaf. — Tie the end of the shuttle 
thread to the thread on the spool. Now with the 
shuttle work 4 d. s. on spool thread, then with 
shuttle thread alone, work 2 d. s., 1 p. until you 
have 20 d. s. ; close up the stitches. * With shuttle 
work on spool thread 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s.; with 
shuttle thread alone work 2 d. s., join to last 
previous scollop, 2 d. s., 1 p., until you have 



Repeat from * to 



p. of 
20 d. 
until 




a., close up stitches * 

you have 3 scollops. With the shuttle work on 
spool thread 4 d. s., then with shuttle thread alone 
work 2 d. s., join to last p. of previous scollop, work 
2 d. s., 1 p., until you have 30 d. s. ; close 
up stitches. With shuttle work 4 d. s. 
on spool thread. * With shuttle thread 
alone make 2 d. s., join to last p. of pre- 
vious scollop, 2 d. s., 1 p., until you have 
20 d. s. ; close up stitches. With shuttle 
make 4 d. s. on spool thread, join to 
opposite p. of leaf made with spool 
thread, 4 d. s. on spool thread *. Repeat 
from * to * till you have 3 scollops. 
This makes a leaf of 7 scollops. Then 
with shuttle make on spool thread 15 d. 
s., then with shuttle thread alone make 
2 d. s., 1 p., until you have 10 d. s. ; join 
to middle p. of last scollop, 2 d. s., 1 p., 
until you have 10 d. s. ; close up stitches. 
Repeat frcm beginning of 1st scollop 
until you have another leaf of 7 scollops. 
When you have the desired number of 
leaves, tack them together with a needle and thread, 
then baste them on a piece of stiff paper, make a 
row of d. c. across the top and fill in centers with 
cobweb stitch done with needle and thread as 
represented in the engraving. 



20 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Tatted Panel Lace. 

Nos. 43 and 44. — The shell panel of this lace is 
made with 2 threads. Make a ring of 2 d. s., then 
5 p., each separated by 2 d. s., 2 d. s., and close; 



in the picture. To finish the upper edge make 
large and tiny rings the same as in the bar, joining 
every other large ring to the shells and bars (see 
picture). The trimming may be made as much 
deeper as desired by making more shells, and also 
by making the bars longer. 




No. 43. — Tatted Panel Lace. 




No. 44. — Tatted Panel for Lace. 



tie on the 2nd thread and make a ch. the same as 
the ring was made; now make a 2nd ring and join 
it to the corresponding p. of the 1st ring, where the 
2nd p. would come; then make another ch., and 
continue rings and chs. until there are 6 rings and 
5 chs; then fasten and cut the thread. 
Make 2 more shells and join each to the 
last one when making, as shown in the 
picture of the panel or insertion at No. 44. 
The bar between the shells is made with 

1 thread thus: Make a ring of * 2 d. s., 7 
p., each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s., 
and close, leaving about an eighth of an 
inch of thread; turn the work and make a 
tiny ring of 1 d. s., 3 p., each separated by 

2 d. s., then 1 d. s. and close; turn, and 
make another ring like the last one, but 
where the first p. would come join it to the 
corresponding p. of the large ring. Turn 
again and make another tiny ring, then re- 
peat from * until there are 5 large rings (see 
picture); then make 2 tiny rings and 1 large ring; 
this brings you to the bottom. Now work up the 
other side to correspond with the one just made, 
and join the tiny rings through the center, as seen 



Tatted Edging. 

No. 45. — Begin with 1 thread and make a 

ring of 9 d. s., 1 p., then 6 d. s., and draw up. 

Fasten on the 2nd thread and make a ch. of 

n d. s., then a ring with 1 thread thus: 10 

d. s., draw up; take the 2 threads again, tie 

so as to hold the ring close, then continue 

the ch. with 2 d. s., 4 long p. each separated 

by 3 d. s., 12 d. s. ; now make a large ring 

of 7 d. s., 1 long p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. 

s., 1 p„ 2 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s.; join to the 

p. of the 1st ring made; 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. 

s., 1 p., 6 d. s., draw up; now make another 

ring of 6 d. s., join to last p. in ring just 

made, 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 

4 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up. Now make 

a large ring drawn out long instead of round, thus: 

6 d. s., join to last p. of ring just made, 4 d. s., 1 p., 

3 d. s., 5 p., each separated by 3 d. s., 4 d. s., 1 p., 

6 d. s., draw up. 

Now make another ring like the one before the 
last, joining it at the side, and then a large ring of 
6 d. s.; join to last ring; 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. 
s., draw up; turn the work and use 2 threads again, 
and make a ch. of 12 d. s., then 5 p. each separated 
by 3 d. s., then 9 d. s. ; turn the work, and with 2 
threads make 6 d. s. Join to 2nd p. from last join- 
ing, and so as to leave 4 p. underneath the ch. (see 
picture); make 5 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s. draw up; now 
make a larger ring and draw it out long instead of 
round; 4 d. s., join to last ring, 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; now make another 
ring thus: 4 d. s., join to last ring; 5 d. s., 1 p., 6 
d. s., draw up; now make a ch. like the 1st one 
made, only in making the ring after the 11 d. s. 




No. 45. — Tatted Edging. 



made with 2 threads, join the ring, after making 4 
d. s., to the 1 st p. in the opposite ch.; then com- 
plete the ch. and repeat all the directions for the 
remainder of the work. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



21 



Tatted Insertion 

No. 46. — * Begin with one thread and make a 
ring of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. S. 
and close. Join 2nd thread and make 4 d. 5., then, 
using 1 thread, make a ring of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s. and close. Using both 
threads make 4 d. s.,and repeat from* for length 
• desired, except that you join the rings together by 
r the side p. For the other side make * a ring of 4 
d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s. and close. 
Join 2nd thread and make 4 d. s., join to middle 
p. of the ring made; with 2nd thread make 4 d. 
s. and repeat from * for length desired, except 
that the rings are joined together by side p. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 47. — This edging is made with two threads. 
First with the shuttle thread make a ring of 2 d. 
s.,then 9 p. each separated by 2 d. s., then 1 d. 
s.,and close. Pass the thread back of the work 
and tie it in the 4th p.; then draw it through the 
same p. and tie again, leaving a loop about ^2 
inch long; to obtain this loop draw it out and hold 
it between the first and second fingers while passing 
the shuttle through the other loop, so that it will 
not slip; now take the second thread and with the 
two threads make a chain of 8 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 
p., S d. s. (this should be, when made, the same 
length as the loop); now tie the chain in the end 
of the loop, and make another ring like the first 
one close to the chain; then carry both threads 
along the back of the ring at the top and catch in 
the 4th p., but in drawing them down for tying, 
leave another loop the same length as the first one 
made, but in this instance draw with the shuttle 
thread and hold the other loop tightly between the 
first and second fingers; this is done after the 2 




No. 46. — Tatted Insertion. 



end with a ring, then break the thread and tie. 
Now, for the scollop, also use two threads, but 
begin with the shuttle and make 7 d. s., tie in the 
5th p. from the chain at the bottom in the last ring 
made, with the wrong side of the work held toward 





No. 47.— Tatted Edging. 

threads are drawn up, as usual, through the p., and 
the shuttle passed through them; now make another 
chain, being careful to hold the loop beneath the 
thumb and finger so it will not slip, and repeat 
rings and chains until you have the desired length; 



No. 48. — Pointed Tatted Edging. 

you, 7 d. s., and close; * turn the work, take the 
second thread and with the two make a chain of 4 
d. s., then 3 p. each separated by 2 d. s., then 4 d. 
s., turn the work, make another ring like the last 
and tie in the next p., and repeat 3 times more 
from *; this will make 5 rings and 4 chains and 
complete the scollop. Now leave about % inch of 
thread and make the next scollop in the same way, 
tying the first ring in the first p. (see picture); and 
when you make the first chain in the second scollop 
leave the same length of thread as from the shuttle. 
Repeat for all the scollops. 

Pointed Tatted Edging. 

No. 48. — Make a strip of heading as long as the 
trimming is desired, thus: 

First, make a ring of 6 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 
d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. ; draw up the ring, turn the work, 
and close it to make another ring like the 1st; now 
take the 2nd thread and with the 2 make a ch. of 8 
d. s., and repeat from the beginning; but in making 
the next ring join it to the side p. of the 1st one 
after making the 6 d. s., and join each of the re- 
maining rings in the same way. Now to begin the 
points, take the 2 threads and tie in the bottom 
or middle p. of the 1st ring; then make a ch. of 
7 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., and tie 
to the p. of next ring, and repeat this across the 
work. Now tie the threads in the middle p. 
of the 1st ch., and make another row like the 
last one. Tie again in the middle p. of first 
ch., make a ch. like the one first made, tie in 
the middle p. of next ch., and repeat 3 times 
more; then below this make 3 chs., then 2 
chs., and then 1; this completes 1 point. 
Make the remaining points in the same way. (See 
picture.) For the chains above the heading, make 
the same as the 1st row of chains. In making the 
picots draw them out long, as much of the beauty 
in tatting is due to the length of the picots. 






22 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Narrow Tatted Edging. 



d. 



No. 49. — This edge may be made with thread 
ranging in numbers from 30 to 60. 

Begin with center ring by making 3 
d. s., and 1 p. until you have 45 d. 
stitches. * Make 2 d. s., join to 1st 
ring, make 2 d. s.; close up stitches. * 



s-, 1 p., 3 

s. ; close up 
p. of center 
Repeat from 



rjjf 1% \-- ? ^t**g *&% 


- ,—r a 1 * &■ 

vV 










tj- 

-^3 


r^O^St^fe^ 




1p %v| 






«s°. 

J 



No. 49. — Narrow Tatted Edging. 

* to * for next 4 p. of the center ring ; then make 
2 d. s. and 1 p. until you have 30 d. s.; close up 
stitches. Make 2 d. s., join to 6th p. of center 
ring, 2 d. s., close up stitches, 2 d. s., join to last p. 
of leaf, 2 d. s., and r p. until you have 36 d. s.; 
close up stitches; 2 d. s., join to p. of center ring; 
2 d. s., close up stitches; 2 d. s., join to 1st p. of 
2nd leaf, 2 d. s., and 1 p. until you have 30 d. s., 
close up stitches; * 2 d. s., join to next p. of center 
ring; 2 d. s., close up stitches *. Repeat from * to 

* until all the p. of center ring have been filled. 
Fasten the end of the spool thread to the shuttle 
thread, then with shuttle work on spool thread 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 16 d. s. Then with shuttle thread alone work 
2 d. s., 1 p., until you have 15 d. s., join to center p. 
of last leaf; then 2 d. s., 1 p., until you have 15 more 
d. s.; close up stitches. With shuttle thread alone 
make 2 d. s. ; join to last p. of last leaf, 2 d. s., 1 p., 
until you have 36 d. s.; close up stitches. With 
shuttle thread alone 

make 2 d. s., join to 
, last p. of last leaf, 2 d. 
s., 1 p. until you have 
30 d. s. ; close up stitch- 
es. With shuttle work 
on spool thread 4 d. s., 
1 p., 16 d. s. This 
makes 2 points. Re- 
peat from beginning. 
After making the num- 
ber of points required 
with shuttle thread 
alone, work 2 d. s., 1 p. 
center ring ; work 6 d. s., 1 

stitches. Work 2 d. s., join to last p. of previous 
scollop; 6 d. s. ; join to last p. of center ring; 6 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s.; close up stitches; 2 d. s., join to 
last p. of previous scollop, 6 d. s., join to p. of 
stitches worked on the spool thread, 6 d. s., 1 p., 2 
d. s., close up stitches ; * 2 d. s., join to last p. of 



previous scollop; 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., close 
up stitches *. Repeat from * to * until you have 3 
scollops. Then make 2 d. s., join to last p. of pre- 
vious scollop; 6 d. s., join to p. of stitches made on 
spool thread, 6 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., close up stitches. 
This finishes 2 points. Finish the other points in 
the same way. After the points are all finished 
baste them on a piece of stiff paper and fill in 
the spaces below the clover 
leaves with cob-web stitch. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 50. — This edging is 
shown made of thread, al- 
though it is very pretty made 
of silk. The edging is made 
with 2 threads. Use the 
shuttle first and make a ring 
of 2 d. s , then 8 p. each sep- 
arated by 2 d. s., and draw 
up; this makes the center of 
the clover leaf. Next with 
the 2 threads make a ch. of 2 
d. s., then 8 p. each separated 
by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s., join to 3rd p. in center ring; 
make another ch. like the last, skip 2 p., join to the 
next one, then another ch. and join where the 1st 
ch. started from; then make another ch., turn the 
work and make a ring thus: 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
1 p., 2 d. s., join to 3rd p. in the ch. around the 
center ring, 2 d. s., then 5 p., each separated by 2 
d. s. ; then 2 d. s. and close. Nov/ with the 2 
threads make another ch. and repeat from the 
beginning, joining the next ch. in the clover leaf 
to the 3rd p. of the ring between the upper chs. 
where the 3rd p. in the chain would come. 

Tatted Insertion. 

No. 51. — Two threads are required. With 1 
thread make 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 
4 d. s., draw up; with both threads make 5 d. s. (as 
close to 1 st loop as possible), 1 p., 5 d. s.; with r 
thread make 4 d. s. and join to 3rd p. of 1st loop, 




No. 50. — Tatted Edging. 



No. 51. — Tatted Insertion. 



6 d. s., 
s., 1 p., 



join to 
2 d. s. ; 



1 st p. of 
close up 



4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; with both 
threads make 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s.; then with 1 
thread make another loop like first 2 and so on for 
the first half of insertion. For the other half make 
a loop with 1 thread like those of the first half, then 
with both threads make 5 d. s. and join in the p. of 
the half loop on the opposite side, 5 d. s. Continue 
as in the first half. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



23 



Tatted Edging. 

No. 52. — This is a strong, durable edging for 
underclothing, and may be worked with fine or 
coarse thread, as preferred The edging is worked 
with one thread only 

Work a small ring of 2 d. s., 1 picot, 4 d. s., 1 p., 
4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., draw the stitches up, and turn 
the ring downward. Work 
a large ring of 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 
d. s., 10 p., each separated by 
2 d. s., then 3 d. s. ; * turn the 
work down again, and work 

2 d. s., join to last p. of the 
1st small ring, 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. ; turn again, 
make 3 d. s., join to last p. 
of the large ring, 3 d. s., 1 p., 

3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., draw 
together and turn the work 
again ; 2 d. s., join to last p. 
of small ring, 4 d. s., 1 p.. 4 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. ; turn the 
work, make 3 d. s., join to 
last p. of small ring joining 
the large one ; 2 d. s., 10 picots, each separated by 
2 d. s., then 3 d. s., and draw up; repeat from * until 
it is of the desired length, leaving a space of about 
an eighth of an inch of thread between the rings. 

For the Heading. — Crochet 2 rh. and 1 s. c, alter- 
nately in the picots along the top of the edging. 

Clover-Leaf Lace. 

No. 53. — This lace is made with 2 threads. Begin 
with 1 thread and make a ring of 5 d. s., 7 p., each 
separated by 3 d. s., 5 d. s., and close; then close 
to the last ring make another ring, but after the 5 
d. s., join to the opposite p. of ring just made; then 
make another ring just like the last. Now take the 
2nd thread and make a ch. of 8 d. s., 9 p. each sep- 
arated by 3 d. s., then 8 d. s., and repeat from be- 
ginning. Crochet a ch. of n stitches caught in the 



tie to 1 st p. in center ring, * make another ring 
like the last, tie to next p. in center ring, and re- 
peat 6 times more from *, or until there are 8 
rings, leaving 4 p. free in center ring. Now tie 
the thread in the p. of the ring last made, and 
turn the work; then make a ring thus: 4 d. s., 1 p., 
3 d. s., then 4 p., each separated by 3 d. s. ; then 4 
d. s., and draw up; tie in the p. of next ring; * then 





No. 52. — Tatted Edging. 



middle p. of each ch. with a half-double crochet 
across the top. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 54. — For each scollop, first make a large ring 
thus: Make 3 d. s., then 12 p., each separated by 3 
d. s., and draw up. Turn the work and make a 
small ring of 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., and close; now 



No. 54— Tatted Edging. 



make another ring like the last, only instead of 
making the 1st p., join it to the last p. made in last 
ring; tie in p. of next ring, and repeat 5 times more 
from *; turn the work and tie in the 3rd p. of the 
last ring made. 

Now make a group of 3 tiny rings, making each 
ring with 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. 
s., and draw up; make these rings close together, 
then tie again in the same p.; now tie in the middle 
p. of next ring, and repeat from the beginning until 
there are 7 groups around the scollop. 

For the Heading. — Make a ring thus: Make 2 d. 
s., then 10 p. each separated by 2 d. s., and close 
the ring. Carry the thread along at the back of the 
work and tie in the 5th p. of ring just made. 
* Make another ring like the last one and tie it 
again in the same 5th p., then repeat from * until 

the heading is the re- 
quired length. Now 
use the edge of the 
heading having 4 p. 
for the bottom, and 
join to the scollop 
thus: Tie the side p. 
of the tiny ring to the 
last p. of the 1st ring 
(in heading) and 1st 
p. in 2nd ring, then tie 
the 2 middle p. of 
center ring to the last 
p. of 3rd ring and the 
1 st p. of 4th ring, skip 1 ring and tie the side p. 
of tiny ring to the 5th and 6th rings, the same as 
at the beginning, and tie all the scollops to the 
heading in the same way. Join the scollops by 
the center p. of each middle ring in each upper 
group, and be particular to make all the tyings 
come on the wrong side. This scollop is very 
pretty when made of silk. 




No. 53. — Clover-Leaf Lace. 



24 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Cable Insertion. 

No. 55. — This insertion is made with a shuttle 
and spool — or with two shuttles. 

For Small Ring. — Make 6 double stitches, 1 p., 
6 double stitches, draw up. 

For Cable. — Make 2 double stitches, ! p., and so 
on until there are 7 p. 

Make one ring, 1 
cable, 2 rings, and 
join center of first ring 
to p. in first one made; 
1 ring, 1 cable, and so 
on until the desired 
length is reached. At 
the end, make 1 cable 
in place of second 
ring; join center of 
next ring to group; 1 
cable, join center of 
next ring to group. 
Proceed in the same 
way to the end of the 
row, then make 1 cable 
for end. 

Third row. — Same 
as first, joining the cables by their center picots. 

Pointed Tatted Edging. 

No. 56. — This edging is worked alternately with 
one and two threads. 

Begin with one thread only, and work a ring of 
4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., and 
draw the stitches together; * turn the ring down- 
ward and with two threads work a scollop of 4 d. s., 
1 p., 4 d. s., turn the work up again and with one 
thread make another ring like the first, but instead 



No. 



57- 




No. 55. — Cable Insertion. 



and 3 scollops; cut off thread as before, and so 
continue decreasing until you have 2 rings and 1 
scollop at the point. Work all the points in the 
same way. 

Tatted Edging. 

Begin by making a ring of 6 d. s., 

3 p., each separated 
by 6 d. s., then 6 d. s. 
and close. * Leave a 
quarter of an inch of 
thread, then make an- 
other ring like the 
last, but join it to the 
side p. of last ring 
after making the 1st 
6 d. s. ; repeat twice 
more from *; then 
make the bottom ring 
thus: Close to the last 
ring, make 6 d. s., join 
to side p. of last ring, 

4 d. s., then 5 p., each 
separated by 2 d. s., 4 
d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. and 
close. Work rings like 

the first 4 for the other side, but between each 
tie to the thread between the rings (see pic- 
ture); leave three-fourths of an inch of thread 
and begin the next scollop, make the same as the 
1st one, but join to the last at the middle p. (see 
picture). 

For the Heading. — -Catch in the 1st p. on top ; 
crochet * 3 ch., then in the deep space make treble 
crochets thus : th. o. twice, pick up a loop under the 
1st tying, th. o., work off 2 stitches, then 2 more, 
then 1 d. c. through the lower part of treble, but 





No. 56. — Pointed Tatted Edging. 



No. 57. — Tatted Edging. 



of forming 1st p., join to last p. of previous ring; 
repeat from * for the length desired. 

To form the points, work rings and scollops in 
the same way, working for the second row 5 rings 
and 4 scollops and joining the rings to the strip 
already worked; tie the thread securely and cut off 
closely on the wrong side so that the fastening will 
not show. Then on these 4 scollops work 4 rings 



only work off half of it ; then make another d. c. 
in the same place and work off, working through 
the last 3 stitches at once, 3 ch., 1 s. c. in next p. 
and repeat from *. 

Next row. — D. c. with 2 
third stitch. (See picture). 

Next row. — D. c. with 2 
space. 



ch. between in every 
ch. between in every 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



25 



Narrow Tatted Edging. 

No. 58. — This edging consists of 1 row of wheels 
made like those in the edging shown at No. 13 on 
page 8, and a fancy heading joins the wheels as 
shown in the picture. 

For the Heading. Make kirge and small rings 



d. s., 7 p., with 2 d. s. between, 3 d. s., join to p. of 
braid, 3 d. s., 7 p., with 2 d. s. between, 3 d. s., join 
to p. of braid, 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., join to p. of 
braid, 4 d. s., join to p. of braid, 4 d. s., join to 
next p. of braid, 7 d. s., join to last p. made, repeat 
from last *. 

For Upper Edge. — Rings made of groups of 5 






No. OS. — Xakkow Tatted Edging. 




Xo. 59. — Edging of Braid and Tatting. 



thus: Make a tiny ring of 2 d. s. and 3 p., each 
separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s. and close ; turn the 
work and make a large ring of 2 d. s., 1 half-stitch, 
then 7 p., each separated by 2 d. s. and 1 half-stitch ; 
then 2 d. s. and 1 half-stitch and close ; * turn, and 
make another tiny ring, and join it to the side p. of 
1 st tiny ring ; turn again, make another one like the 
last, but join it to the 1st p. of large ring; then 
turn again and make another like the last, but join 
it to the side p. of the second tiny ring made ; turn 
again and make a large ring and join it to the side 
p. of the opposite tiny ring; turn, make another 
tiny ring, joining it to opposite p. of tiny ring ; 
turn, and make another large ring and join it to last 
large ring ; then repeat from * for the remainder of 
the heading. Join the 
heading to the wheels 
by the middle p. of 
each large wheel, as 
shown in the picture. 

Edging of Braid 
a\d Tatting. 

No. 59. — In working 
this edging use fancy 
lace braid. Begin with 
the trefoil ; make 7 d. 
s., 1 p., 7 d. s., fasten 
to middle p. of braid, 
7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., 
draw. 

Second ring. — * 7 d. 
s.. fasten to last p. of 
1st ring, 7 d. s., fasten 
to middle p. of braid, 

omitting 1 figure, 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., draw; repeat 
from *. This completes the trefoil. 

Outer Scollop. — (VVorked with double thread and 
joined through the middle p. of each figure of the 
braid.) To form the scollop: Begin with p. of 
middle figure, 3 d. s., join to p. of next figure of 
braid, 7 d. s., 1 p., * 7 d. s., join to p. of braid, 3 




No. 60.— Wheel-Edging in Tatting. 



d. s. and connected by 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. worked 
with double thread. 



Wheel-Edging in Tatting. 

No. 60. — The wheels of this edging are made 
separately with one thread. Begin at the middle 
by making a ring of 1 d. s., 12 p., each separated 
by 2 d. s. ; then 1 d. s. ; fasten the thread and cut it 
off. Now work a smaller ring as follows: * 6 d. s.; 
join to a p. of the middle ring, 6 d. s. ; turn the 
work, and after a fifth of an inch interval work a ring 
of 4 d. s., 1 p. about a fifth of an inch long; then 5 
times alternately, 2 d. s., 1 p. an eighth of an inch 
long; then 2 d. s., 1 p. a fifth of an inch long, 4 d. 

s., turn the work, and 
after a fifth of an inch 
interval, repeat from 
*, but in working the 
larger ring, join to the 
last p. of the preced- 
ing larger ring instead 
of forming the 1st p. 

For the Heading. — 
2 threads are needed 
Fasten the ends of the 
thread together, and 
with 1 thread make a 
ring of * 4 d. s., 5 p., 
each separated by 2 
d. s., then 4 d. s., and 
close in a ring; turn 
it over so that the 
p. will be downward, 
and with both threads 
s., 1 p., 5 d. s. ; turn 
the work back and repeat from last * joining 
the p. of 1st and 2nd half-circle to middle p. of 
2 upper rings of the wheel; then 2 half-circles 
without joining; join next 2 and so continue across 
the work. For insertion add the edge to both 
sides of the wheels. 



make a half-circle of 5 d. 



26 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Tatted Rosette-Edging. 

No. 61. — Begin by making the inner circle of 
rings thus: Make i d. s., i long p., * 3 d. s., 1 long 




No. 61. — Tatted Rosette-Edging. 



p., and repeat from * until there are 8 long p. in 
the ring; then 3 d. s. ; draw up and draw the 
thread through the 1st p. made and tie; * leave a 
short length of thread (see picture), and make 
another ring of 1 d. s., 1 long p., 3 d. s. ; join to 
corresponding p. of last ring; 3 d. 
s., join to next p., 3 d. s., then 5 
long p. each separated by 3 d. s.; 
then 3 d. s., draw up and tie as be- 
fore, only draw the thread through 
the p. and the thread which con- 
nects the rings at the same time 
instead of through the p. only. 
Repeat from * 10 times more, 
drawing the rings out long instead 
of round; and after the last ring 
is made, join to the first, so as 
to make a circle, making the 
joining as neatly as possible. 

Now for the outer circle of rings, which are 
somewhat larger, make 2 d. s., then 9 very long p. 
each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s., draw up and 
fasten in the middle p. of a ring in the 1st circle. 
Carry the thread along so the outer circle will lie 
flatly, and fasten the thread in the middle p. of 
next ring; make another ring like the last, being 
particular to make the p. very long; then after 
drawing up the ring, tie it again in the same 
p. and proceed with the next one in the same 
way. Make 12 large rings, then join neatly to 
the 1st one made; tie the last p. of each ring 
to the corresponding p. of the next ring, and 
join the rosettes by p. as seen in the picture. 

Tatted Insertion. 

No. 62. — Make a large ring thus: 5 d. s., 1 
p., 5 d. s., 1 p., s d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up; 
join 2nd thread and make 5 d. s., then using 
2nd thread, make small ring of 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. 
and draw up; another ring made close to this of 1 d. 
s., 7 p., each separated by 1 d. s. and draw up; a 




No. 62. — Tatted Insertion. 



small ring like 1st, of 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. Then 

using 2 threads make 5 d. s. ; turn and make a large 

ring like 1st one. Repeat this for length desired. 

The other side is made like the first, except that 

it is joined in middle p. of large 

ring instead of making 1 p. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 63. — This edging is made of 
large and small figures which are 
tied together, and to them is tied 
the heading. 

To make the large Figure. — 
Begin with the shuttle thread and 
make 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., then 7 
p. each separated by 4 d. s., and 
close; turn the work and with 2 
threads make a chain of 6 d. s., 
then 5 p. each separated by 3 d. s., 
then 6 d. s., skip 1 p., and tie to the 
next one, which will be the 6th p. 
made in the ring; now make an- 
other chain, but make 7 p. instead 
of 5, skip 2 p., and tie to the next p., then make 
another chain like the 1st one; skip 1 p. and tie to 
the last one, then fasten to the threads. 

To make the small Figure. — Make 5 d. s., then 

3 p., each separated by 5 d. s. then 5 d. s. and 

close; make 3 more rings close to- 
gether like the last one, and close 
the figure by tying to the 1st thread. 
Make as many large and small fig- 
ures as the length of the trimming 
calls for, and tie together, tying the 
middle p. of the middle ring in the 
small figure to the 2nd one from 
the bottom in the side chain of the 
large figure. 

To make the Heading. — Make a 
strip of rings as long as desired, 
each ring made of 4d. s., 1 p., then 
6 p. each separated by 4 d. s., then 

4 d. s., and close; carry the thread along the back 
and tie to the middle p.; make another ring like 
the last one and tie in the same p.; repeat for all the 
rings. Tie the strip to the lower figure as shown; 
then take 2 threads and tie in the middle p. of the 




No. 63. — Tatted Edging. 



1 st ring in the heading, and make a chain of 6 d. s., 
1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s.; tie to the mid- 
dle p. of the next ring, and repeat across the work. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



27 



Ta r iK.i) Edging. 



2 threads, 
thus: 3 d. 



No. 64. — This edging is made with 
Begin with the shuttle and make ring 
s., 1 p., 2 d. s., then 8 p. each separated 
by 2 d. s. ; 3 d. s., and close. Now take 
the two threads and make a chain of 2 
d. s.. then 8 p. each separated by 2 d. s., 
then 2 d. s. 

* * Now with the one thread or shuttle 
make a large ring thus: Make 3 d. s., 1 
p., 2 d. s., then 13 p. each separated by 
2 d. s., then 3 d. s., and close. Now with 
the 2 threads make a chain of 2 d. s., 
then 15 p. each separated by 2 d. s., then 
2 d. s., but instead of making the 8th p., 
join to the 3rd p. of the ring. * Next 
make another ring like the last one, but 
at the 3rd p., instead of making the p., 
join to the corresponding p. of the last 
ring; now make another chain like the last one made, 
omitting the joining, and repeat 5 times more from 
*; this gives you 6 chains and 7 large rings. Now 
for the portion which joins the figure at the top: 
Take the two threads and make a chain of 2 d. s., 8 
p. each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s.; now a small 
ring like the 1st one made, except 
that you join it at the 3rd p. to the 
7th p. of the last chain around the 
figure; then make two more chains 
like the last one, with a ring like 
the last one between the chains, and 
join the ring at the 3rd p. to the 
corresponding p. of the last ring. 
Repeat from * * for all the work, 
but in repeating the figures join 
the 2nd chain at the 8th p. to the 
corresponding p. at the opposite 
chain. 



desired, joining them to each other by the 3rd p. of 
2 successive rings. 

The next row is worked the same, joining the 
rings to each other and also to the row just worked, 





Tatted Passementerie. 
No. 65. — This passementerie is 



No. 65. — Tatted Passementerie, 



worked with one thread throughout, and consists of 
2 rows of large four-leaved figures joined together 
in working. To begin a figure, work 4 d. s., 7 rather 
long p. with 3 d. s. between each, then 4 d. s. ; draw 
the stitches together and work 3 more similar rings 




No. 01.— Tatted Edging. 



close together. Fasten the threads securely and 
neatly, and cut them off. Work as many of the 
four-leaved figures as are needed for the length 



No. 66. — Tatted Zig-Zag Edging. 

as shown in the illustration. If a wider passemen- 
terie is desired, still another row of the four-leaved 
figures may be worked. 

Tatted Zig-Zag Edging. 

No. 66. — Make a long strip of rings, each ring 
made thus: Make 3 d. s., then 8 
p. each separated by 3d. s.; draw 
up, break the thread and tie neatly. 
Now make another ring like the 
last, except that you join it to the 
one just made where the 4th p. 
would come, and so continue until 
the strip is long enough. For the 
wheel make a ring of 7 d. s., then 
3 p. each separated by 7 d. s., then 
7 d. s. and close; make 5 more rings 
close together like the last one, 
but join to the side p. after making 
the first 7 d. s., and in making the 
last ring, also join where the 3rd p. 
would come, to the side p. in first 
ring; then tie together neatly as seen in the picture. 
Now take the 2 threads and tie to the middle p. 
of a ring; then make a ch. of 7 d. s., then 5 p., each 
separated by 2 d. s. ; 7 d. s., and join to the next 
ring; repeat in each of the remaining rings and tie 
neatly. 

For the Heading. — Make * 3 d. s., then 7 p. each 
separated by 3 d. s., then 3 d. s. and close; turn the 
work and make another similar ring close to it; 
then take the 2 threads and make a ch. of 8 d. s., 
and repeat from * until there are 7 rings. Now 
make the ch., then make 4 rings without turning the 
work, but in making the chs. between each ring, 
make 1 p. in each ch. after making the 8th d. s., 
and just before making the next ring, and repeat 
from 1st * for all the heading. Now, to form the 
design, lay the strip of rings around the wheels as 
seen in the picture, leaving 2 of the chs. free, and 
tying the rings to the other 4 chs. as illustrated. 
Tie the heading to the scollops so that the space 
having 4 rings and chains between will come over 
the wheel which has the beading across its top. 



28 



TATTING AND NETTING, 



Tatted Rosette Edging and Insertion. 



part, and make 
d. s., 8 p. each 
i d. s., and draw up. 
Now, around this ring 



No. 67. — Begin with the upper 
each wheel thus: Make a ring of 1 
separated by 2 d. s., then 
Break the thread and tie. 
make a ring of 3 d. s.,then 5 
p. each separated by 2 d. s., 
then 3 d. s., and close; tie this 
to a p. in the first ring; then 
make 7 more rings like the 
last one, except that you join 
each ring to the last one after 
making the first 3 d. s., in- 
stead of making the p., and 
also tie the last ring to the 
first one made at their corre- 
sponding p. Make as many 
rosettes and wheels as neces- 
sary for the length of trim- 
ming desired; then tie them 
together at the corresponding 
middle p. of 2 rings in each 
wheel. Now take the 2 
threads and tie to the middle 
p. of the first of the two 
upper rings; then make a 
chain of 3 d. s., 5 p. each sep- 
arated by 3 d. s., and 3 d. s.; tie in the middle p. 
of next ring, and repeat across the row; then work 
in the same way across the lower edge. Now, cro- 
chet a chain of 10 stitches and catch with a s. c. in 
the middle p. of each chain across the upper and 
lower edge. Make the wheels for the lower part 
the same as for the upper, except that you make 
one more p. in the rings around the center ring, and 
make another row of 10 rings like the ones just 
made, and tie around the lower part of each wheel, 
leaving 3 rings in each wheel free, and tying in 
every other p. of the first circle. Now take the 2 
threads and make chains like those first made across 
the upper part of the wheels, (see picture); then 
crochet a chain like the one in the upper part, ex- 




No. 67. — Tatted Rosette Edging and Insertion 



Tatted Edging. 

No. 68. — This edging is worked with two threads. 
First, work thus, with one thread only the small ring 
in the center: 1 d. s., * 1 p., 2d. s. Repeat from* 
until 8 p. are made; then make 1 d. s., draw the 
stitches up, fasten the thread 
neatly and cut it off. 

Now with two threads, work 
as follows: * With one thread 
make a ring of 6 d. s., join 
to a p. of the small center 
ring, 6 d. s., draw the stitches 
up, turn the ring downward, 
and with both threads make 
a chain of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s. ; turn the work up again, 
and repeat from * all round. 
In working the rosettes join 
them to each other by the p. 
of the chains as shown in 
the illustration of the work. 
After completing the ro- 
settes, a row of chains is 
worked all along one edge, 
and a crocheted heading 
along the other. 

For the chains work with 
both threads thus: * Fasten to the joining p. be- 
tween 2 rosettes, 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., join to p. of 
next chain, 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., join to p. of next 
chain; 6 d. s., 1 p. 6 d. s., and repeat from * 
entirely across the work. This makes a very pretty 
trimming for underclothing. For the other edge 
work with a crochet hook. Join to the p. of first 
scollop, chain 4, * slip stitch in p. of next scollop, 
chain 1, 1 d. c. in the joining p. between 2 rosettes, 
chain 1,1 d. c. in same place, chain 1, 1 d. c. in 
same place as before, chain 1, slip stitch in p. of 
next chain, chain 4. Repeat from * all across. 

Tatted Wheel-Edging. 
No. 69. — Begin with center as follows: * 1 d. s., 





No. 68. — Tatted Edging. 



No. 69. — Tatted Wheel-Edging. 



cept that you also make 2 long treble crochets be- 
tween the wheels to make the work as even as 
possible (see picture). Join the upper and lower 
portions by a strip of insertion, cambric, or any 
preferred fabric. 



1 p., and repeat from * until you have 10 p., 
making the p. a little more than an eighth of an 
inch in length; draw up and fasten. For the next 
row of loops make 4 d. s., fasten to p. of center, 
4 d. s., draw up. Leave a small space of thread, 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



29 



turn and make the outside row as follows: 
i p.; repeat from star until there are 12 p., making 
the p. a little more than an eighth of an inch in 
length; draw up, and repeat these two rows all the 
wav around the center-loop. Fasten each outside 
loop to preceding one by catching into the nth p. 

These wheels are very 
pretty for edging hand- 
kerchiefs or making col- 
lars; or, a number of them 
caught together make a 
very handsome doily. 
They are quickly and 
easily made. The pretty 
filling-in loop is made as 
follows: Catch the thread 
to the 1 st wheel, leave a 
space, make 7 d. s., and 
draw up; catch to next 
rosette, leaving a space of 
thread between, and soon 
all around the opening. 

If preferred, a fine crocheted heading may be used 
to complete the edging. 

Tatted Lace. 

No. 70. — First make a ring of 30 stitches and 12 
p., with 2^2 stitches between the p. Then make 
a double row, as follows: First, make a small ring 
of 8 stitches and 3 p., with 2 1 /? stitches between the 
p., joining the middle p. to one on the ring; then 
make a large ring of 16 stitches and 3 p.; draw up 
and make another small ring, attaching the first p. 
to the third of the last small ring, and the second 
to the next on the ring; then make another large ring, 
and so on all around the ring. Tie and finish off. 

After making a number of rosettes, make a row 
of same kind of work, attaching the small rings to 
the large ones by p-, observing that two are made in 
outside row, to one of inside. Otherwise, skip one 
inside ring in outside row. (Refer to engraving 
and you will see that this outside row is only at- 
tached to 8 rings of rosette.) After attaching the 
eighth, turn your work over and make 2 large 
rings and 1 small ring without attaching them 
to anything. Then begin on a new rosette. 




No. 70. — Tatted Lack. 



d. s., Continue same details, attaching to top rings of 
rosettes as you come to them. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 71. — This edging is worked with 2 threads. 
Work first with 1 thread a ring of 8 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. 

s. ; draw the stitches up, 
and about three-eighths 
of an inch beyond this 
ring work a similar ring, 
and continue in this way 
until the strip is as long 
as desired. Then work 
with 2 threads as fol- 
lows : With 1 thread work 
a ring of 8 d. s.; join 
to the p. of 1 st ring of 
the previous round, 8 d. 
s. * and close. Turn the 
work, and, close to the 
1st ring, work with both 
threads a chain of 4 d. s., 
3 p., each separated by 4 d. s. ; then 4 d. s. ; turn 
the work, make a ring with 1 thread like the ist, 
joining to the same p. as before, thus forming a 
3-leaved figure ; work another ring with 1 thread, 
joining to the p. of the 2nd ring of the ist round. 
Repeat from * all across. On the outer or lower 
edge work a row of Josephine knots, using the 
shuttle only ; join the thread to the ist p. of a 
scollop, make a Josephine knot of 6 half-stitches, * 
join the thread to the next p., make another 
Josephine knot, (see page 71) and repeat from* all 
across. On the upper edge work alternately 1 slip- 
stitch in each ring where it is closed ; ch. 4 or 5, and 
in working the ch., catch the connecting threads be- 
tween each 2 rings. Now work a row of 2 d. c. in 
each of 2 stitches, * 1 ch., miss 1 stitch, 1 d. c. 
in each of next 2 stitches, repeat from * all across. 

Tatted Silk Edging. 

No. 72. — The edging illustrated is made of silk, 
but cotton may be used, if preferred. Very fine 
thread makes beautiful edging in this design. 

Begin with large loop. Make 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 
1 p., and repeat until you have 10 p. Finish with 





Xn. 71. — Tatted Edging. 



No. 72. — Tatted Silk Edging. 



For the Heading. — Use two threads. Make one 
ring with shuttle, of 16 stitches and 3 p. Then tie 
on your other thread and work onto it 8 stitches 
and 1 p.; then a second row of 16 stitches, attach- 
ing to the ist by p., also to the 2 rings on lace. 



1 d. s. ;ind draw up. Begin the small loop about 
an eighth of an inch from the larger one. Make 5 
d. s. and catch in ist p. of large loop, 5 d. s. and 
draw up. Turn the work over and make 2 d. s., 1 
p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 



30 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



p., 2 d. s.; draw up. * Turn the work. Make 5 
d. s. and catch in 2nd p. of the large loop. Make 
5 d. s. and draw up. Turn. Make 2 d. s. and 
catch in 1st p. of previous loop, 2 d. s. and 1 p., 1 
d. s. and 1 p.; continue until you have 5 p.; finish 
with 2 d. s. and draw up. Turn, as before. Make 
5 d. s. and catch in p. of large loop. Repeat from 




No. 73. — Tatted Edging. 

star until you have five picot-loops. Then fasten 
thread to large loop. Commence 2nd scollop about 
an inch from the 1st, joining the scollop at the top. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 73. — Begin by making * a ring of 3 d. s., 1 
p., then 6 p. with 2 d. s. between, 3 d. s. and close. 
Join 2nd thread and make 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 
3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., and repeat from * 3 times more, 
except that instead of making 2nd p. of ring, join 
to 2nd p. of preceding ring. Then make a small 
ring of 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s.; join to 1st p. of last 
ring, 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s. and close. With 2 threads 
make 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s.. 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. 
With 1 thread make a large ring of 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 
d. s. and join to p. of small ring; 2 d. s., join to p. 
of large ring, 4 p., each separated by 2 d. s., 3 d. s. 
and close. Now take 1 thread and make a ring of 
3 d. s. and 7 p., each separated by 2 d. s. ; 3 d. s. 
and close. With 2 threads make 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. 
s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. Now make a small ring 
of 3 d. s., join to 2nd p. of large ring (to cor- 
respond with other side), 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 
3 d. s. and close. With 2 threads make 2 d. s., 1 
p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. Make a large 
ring of 3 d. s. and join to 2nd p. of small ring; 2 d. 
s., join to p. of next ring, 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., and 
join to middle p. of next ring; 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s. and close. * With 2 threads 
make 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s.; 
make a ring of 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. and join to 2nd 
p. of last ring; 2 d. s. and join to middle p. of ring 
opposite; 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. 
s. and close. Repeat from * twice more. 

Now for the chain across the top, make with 2 
threads a d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. 
Repeat from beginning for length desired. Join 
the chain made with 2 threads to the middle p. of 
opposite chain. (See illustration). 

This edging is made of No. 36 thread, and is a 
very pretty trimming for a baby's dress or skirt. 



Tatted Beading. 

No. 74, — As lace beading is so fashionable for 
decorating all kinds of garments, perhaps there are 
some who would like to make an original beading 
for themselves, and we therefore give a design for 
tatted beading which is much more durable than 
lace beading, and, when made with fine thread, 
from Nos. 70 to 90, is equally as pretty. 

With one thread, make * a ring of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 
d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., and close. With two 
threads make 4 d. s. and repeat from * for half the 
length desired, then break the threads *. Make 
(with one thread) a ring of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 
4 d. s. ; join to p. of ring, 4 d. s. and close. With 
two threads make 4 d. s., then, pulling the 2nd 
thread toward you through the work, make a ring 
of 4 d. s. and join to side p. of ring, 4 d. s., 1 p,, 
4 d. s., and join to p. of next ring; 4 d. s. and close. 
Repeat from * until all the rings are joined 
together. 

This beading is wide enough to run baby ribbon 
through. If wider ribbon is to be used, increase 
the chain made with two threads. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 75. — This beautiful edging is worked with 
2 threads as follows: * With 1 thread only, make 
a ring of 4 d. s., 1 p. one-fifth of an inch long, 3 




No. 74. — Tatted Beading. 

d. s., 1 p., shorter than the last one; 2 d. s.; twice 
alternately, 1 long p., 2 d. s., 1 short p., 3 d. s., 1 
long p., 4 d. s., and close the ring. Now close to 
this, and with both threads, work a scollop of 6 d. 
s., 1 p., 6 d. s. ; then with 1 thread make a ring of 
4 d. s. ; join to the last loop of the preceding ring; 
2 d. s.; 5 times alternately 1 short p., 2 d. s., then 1 
long p., 4 d. s. In connection with this 2nd ring 
work a scollop with both threads as before, and 
repeat from * until the 
strip is of the desired 
length; but instead of 
forming the 1st p. of 
each ring, join to the 
last p. of the preceding 
ring. On the strip now 
completed work scol- 
lops and 3-leaved fig- 
ures as follows: * With both threads work a scollop 
of 5 d. s. ; join to the 2nd long p. in the 1st ring of 
the strip; 5 d. s. ; close to this scollop work with 1 
thread only, a leaf of 5 d. s.; join to the foundation 
thread at the beginning of the scollop just worked; 
2 d. s., 1 short p., 2 d. s., r long p., 2 d. s., 1 short 
p., 2 d. s., 1 short p., 6 d. s.; close the leaf, and 




No. 75. — Tatted Edging. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



81 



close to it make a leaf of 6 d. s., i short p.; 4 times 
alternately make 2 d. s., 1 short p., 6 d. s. ; close the 
leaf and close to it make a leaf like the 1st one. 
This completes the 3-leaved figure. 

Now work with both threads a scollop of 5 d. s., 
join to the 3rd long p. in the 1st ring; 5 d. s., join 
to the last p. of the last leaf; now make a scollop 
of 5 d. s. ; join to the 2nd long p. of the following 
ring of the strip; 5 d. s., repeat from the last *, 
but instead of forming the middle long p. of the 1st 
leaf of each 3-leaved figure, join to the middle p. of 
the last leaf of each figure. 

This pattern can be worked with linen, silk or 
cotton thread, fine or coarse, according to what it 
is used for. Worked with fine linen thread it forms 
a pretty trimming for children's aprons. 

Narrow Edging. 

No. 76. — This makes a strong and durable edg- 
ing for trimming underclothing. Work with fine or 
coarse thread as follows: 

Make 1 ring of 5 d. s., 7 p. each separated by 
3 d. s., 5 d. s. ; after a space of three-eighths of an 
inch, work a similar ring, but instead of forming 
the 1st p. of the ring, join to the last p. of the 
previous ring ; also make the last p. of each ring 
longer than the others. After working a strip as 
long as desired in this manner, work a row of rings 
and chains on the lower edge with 2 threads as 
follows: * With 
1 thread only, 
make a ring of 6 
d. s., join to the 
middle p. of a 
ring of the strip 
just worked, 6 d. 
s., draw the stitch- 
es up, turn the 
work, and with 
both threads 
make a chain of 2 d. s., 3 p., each separated by 2 d. 
s., then 2 d. s. ; turn the work back again, and with 
1 thread make a ring of 6 d. s., join to the next p. 
of the ring before joined to; 2 d. s., join to the next 
p. of the same ring and the 1st free p. of the next 
ring; 2 d. s. ; join to the next p., 6 d. s., draw to- 
gether; turn the work, make a chain as before with 
both threads; turn the work back again, and repeat 
from * all across. On the connecting threads of the 

rings of the 1st round, work 
a row of single crochets. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 77.— This is a very- 
pretty edging for under- 
clothing, and can be 
worked with fine or coarse 
Silk may also be used for 
pattern is worked with 2 
threads as follows: Fasten the threads together 
and with both threads work a scollop of 6 d. s., 1 
p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s. ; close to this scollop work 
with 1 thread only a ring consisting of 7 d. s.; join 
to the beginning of the scollop; 7 d. s. ; draw the 




No. 76.— Narrow Edging. 




No. 77. — Tatted Edging 

linen thread or cotton, 
fancv edgings. The 



stitches together in a ring. Close to this make 
another ring of 5 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. ; 
draw together and fasten to the 1st ring where it is 
closed. Close to this, and with both threads, work 
a scollop of 7 d. s.; then with 1 thread only, work 
a ring of 4 d. s., join to the last p. of the last ring 
worked; 2 d. s., 4 more p. each separated by 2 d. s., 




No. 78. — Tatted Edging 

4 d. s. ; after the last p. draw the stitches together 
and close to this ring make a ring of 4 d. s. ; join 
to the last p. of the foregoing ring; 2 d. s., 6 p., 
each separated by 2 d. s., 3 d. s. ; after the last p., 
close the ring. The latter forms the middle of 1 
point; work the remaining rings and scollops in the 
same manner, but reverse the order of succession. 
In working the last small ring of the point, form a 
p. at the middle; fasten the thread to it after com- 
pleting the last scollop, which is joined to the front 
scollop. Work the remaining points in connection 
with the 1st point. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 78. — Begin by making the center 4-leaved 
figure which is made thus: 9 d. s., 3 p. each 
separated by 5 d. s., 9 d. s. and close. Make 3 
more rings close together like the one just described, 
then tie neatly and break the thread. Next tie the 
thread in the center p. of a ring, and make a ring 
thus : * 5 d. s., then 5 p. each separated by 4 d. s., 

5 d. s. and close ; catch in the next p., and repeat 

6 times more from *, thus working in all but 1 ring 
of the center figure. Make as many scollops like 
the one just made as desired, and tie them together 
by 2 p. of the upper side ring. (See picture.) 

Next tie the 2 threads into the center p. of a side 
ring at the top, and work a ch. of * 4 d. s., then 4 
p. each separated by 4 d. s., then 4 d. s., tie in the 
middle p. of next ring, and repeat 4 times more 
from *, then make 6 d. s,, catch in the corresponding 
p. of the next scollop, and repeat for all the scollops. 

For the Heading. — Tie the thread in the top p. of 
the last ch., and crochet * 5 ch., 1 d. c. in the p. 
where the 1st ring joins the center 4-leaved figure, 
but only work off 2 stitches, make 1 more d. c. in 
the same place, work off 2 stitches, then through 
all, 5 ch., 1 s. c. in the middle p. of center figure, 
5 ch., another 2 d. c, worked like the last 2, in the 
corresponding p, to 1st one, 5 ch., another 2 d. c. 
in the p. where the scollops join, and repeat from * 
for the rest of the strip. 



32 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Next row. — D. c. with 2 ch. between in the 
middle of the 5-ch., and also in the top of the s, c. 
and in the middle of the 2 d. c, (see picture). 




No. 79. — Tatted Edging. 



Next row. — Make d. c. 
every space. 



with 2 ch. between in 



Tatted Edging. 



a ring of 40 d. 
s. separated by 



No. 79. — Use 2 threads. Make 
s. separated by 3 p., draw up; 8 d. 
3 p., join to 1 st p. in center ring; make another 8 
d. s., join to 2nd p. in cen- 
ter ring. Make a ring of 
12 d. s. separated by 5 p., 
draw up; make 8 d. s. sep- 
arated by 3 p. and join to 
1st p. in center. Repeat 
this until you have joined a 
similar ch. of 8 d. s. to each 
center p.; close. Make 8 d. 
s. separated by 3 p. to last 
p. in large center ring; make 

8 d. s. separated by 3 p. and close at base of center 
ring. This completes the figure, which is joined 
to the next by a ch. of 22 d. s. separated by 9 p. 

Narrow Tatted Edging. 

No. 80. — This pretty edging is suitable for trim- 
ming underclothing and edging ruffling. It is 
worked with one and two threads. 

Work with one thread only, a ring of 5 d. s., 1 p., 
5 d. s., 1 p., 10 d. s. ; turn the ring and * work with 
both threads 8 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. s. ; join to the last p. 
made of the ring; turn the work, and with one thread 
only make one ring as before; again join to the last 
p. made in the preceding ring, and repeat from *. 
Crochet along the upper edge of the edging, 1 slip 
stitch in the free p. of the 1st ring, 4 chains; re- 
peat all across. 

Clover-Leaf Insertion. 

No. 81. — With both threads make 7 d. s. ; with 
one thread make 6 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
1 p.. 4 d. s., draw up; then as close as possible 
make 4 d. s. and join in the 3rd p. of 1st loop, 2 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 4 
d. s., draw up; still using one thread make 4 d. s. 




No. 80. — Narrow Tatted Edging, 



and join in last p. of 2nd loop, 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 

1 p., 6 d. s., draw up; with both threads make 7 d. 
s., 1 p., 7 d. s. ; with one thread make 6 d. s. and 
join to the last p. of the 3rd loop in clover-leaf, 

2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; con- 
tinue as in first clover-leaf. With both threads 
make 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s.; with one thread, another 
clover-leaf, and so on for first half. For second 
half, make with both threads 7 d. s. ; then a clover- 
leaf as in first half; with both threads make 7 d. s. 
and join to p. of half loop opposite, 7 d. s., and 
continue as in first half. This edging is very hand- 
some when made of silk. 

Tatted Edging. 

(For Illustration eee Page 33.) 

No. 82. — Two kinds of tatting are employed in 
this edging — that made with one thread and that 
with two. 

First make \\ d. s., * i p. Repeat from * until 
you have 8 p. separated by 2 d. s.; then draw up. 
Do not break the thread, but fasten it to the p. at 
the right. This makes the center ring. 

Then with the same thread make a ring (close to 
the first one) as follows: 4J d. s., 1 p., 4^ d. s., 1 p., 
4^ d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up. Fasten the thread 
to next p. in center-ring. Then make another ring 
with * 4^ d. s., fasten to last p. in 1st small ring, 
then 4I d. s., 1 p., 4% d. s., 

1 p., 4 d. s., draw up. Fas- 
ten thread to next p. in cen- 
ter ring. Repeat from * 
until you come to last p. in 
last ring, fasten it to 1st p. 
in the 1st small ring, then 
4 d. s., draw up. When you 
make the next wheel, instead 
of making the center p. in 

2 of the small rings, join 
them to 2 p. in the wheel just made, as seen in the 
engraving. 

To make the Border. — Use 2 threads. First, with 
1 thread, make a ring with * 4^ d. s., 1 p., 4J d. s., 1 
p., 4^ d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up. Turn work over 
and use 2 threads. In making the 1st single stitch, 
put the shuttle up (or toward you) through the 




No. 81. — Clovek-Leaf Insertion. 



thread, then down; turn work over, and there will 
be 1 double stitch on the side opposite the one that 
you are working on. Continue thus until there are 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



33 



4k d. s. Now take the row of wheels wrong side 
up, place the extr.i (or spool) thread over the ist p. 
on side of the wheel, draw it down through, and 
place the shuttle thread down through the 
loop thus made. Then make 4 d. s. like 
the first 4 d. s. Turn work over, and with 
1 thread make 4^ d. s., join to last p. of 
preceding ring; then 4k d. s., 1 p., 4A- d. s., 

1 p., 4 d. s., draw up. Turn work over 
and with 2 threads make 4A- d. s., join to 
next p. in the wheel, 4 d. s. Turn work 
over, and with 1 thread make a ring like 
the preceding one. Turn work over, and 
with 2 threads make SA- d. s., join in p. that 
joins the 2 wheels together; then 8 d. s. 
Repeat from *. 

An insertion may be made to match the 
edging, by putting the narrow border on 
both sides of the row of wheels. 

Tatted Insertion with Two Threads. 

No. 83. — Begin at the upper right hand 
corner with 1 thread and make a ring 
thus: 2 d. s., 1 p., * 1 d. s., 1 p. and repeat 
5 times more from * ending with 2 d. s. ; 
draw up the ring, join the other thread, turn the 
work and with 2 threads make a ch. ot 2 d. s., 1 
p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 

2 d. s.; turn the wcrk and with 
the first thread make a ring of 
4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s., i p., 4 d. s.; close the ring, 
turn the work and with the 2 
threads make another ch. like 
the last one. Now make 2 
more rings like the last one 
with a 2-thread ch. between, 
and join each ring to the last 
p. of the preceding ring after 
making the ist 4 d. s., instead 
of making the ist p. Now with 
the 2 threads make a ch. of * 2 
d. s., 1 p. and repeat 4 times 

more from * ending with 2 d. s. Now with 1 thread 
make a large ring of * 2 d. s., 1 p., and repeat 11 



to the middle p. of the opposite one and also of the 
large ring after the 2nd 4 d. s. have been made. 
Make 2 more chs. and 2 more rings like those 




J O/ir, \ v -> 



No. 84. — Tatted Edging. 



opposite, joining the rings as they are made, to the 
side and middle p. of the opposite and preceding 
ring; then make a ch. and ring 
like the first ones made, and re- 
peat from beginning for all the 
work, joining the chs. of the 
next scollop at their middle p. 
as shown in the picture. Make 
a strip like this as long as de- 
sired; then make a similar one 
and join it to the first as made, 
according to the picture. 



Tatted Edging. 



No. 83.- 



Tatted Insertion, with Two 
Threads. 




No. 82. —Tatted Edging. 

(For Description eee Page 32.) 



times more from last *; draw up the ring, turn the 
work and make another ch. like the last one. Now 
make another small ring like those opposite, joining 

3 



No. 84. — To make the upper 
section of Double Rings. — With 
one thread make 4 d. s., 1 p., 
4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 3d. s. 
and close the ring; turn, make another ring like 
the last; turn and make another ring also like 
the last two, except that you join it to the side- 
picot of the ist ring after making the ist 4 d. s., 
and this takes the place of the ist p.; turn, make 
another ring, joining it to the second ring made, 
and work in this way until the strip is as long as 
desired. 

For the row of Points below. — First make a ring 
thus: 1 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 
p., 3d. s.; draw up, using the side having 4 p. for 
the bottom or lower part; make a ring close to the 
last one of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 
d. s. ; draw up and fasten the thread to the ist p.; 
make another ring like the last, joining it after the 
ist 4 d. s. to the side-picot of the ist ring instead 
of making the ist p.; fasten to the next p. Now 
make a large ring of 5 d. s.,Join to side-picot of 
last ring, 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. 
s. ; draw up and fasten to the next p. of the foun- 



34 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



dation ring. Then make two more rings like the ist 
2, joining them at the side, and also fastening to the 
ist ring made. Make as many of these figures as 
necessary, allowing i to every 4 rings on the upper 
row, and tying them to the upper row by p., as seen 
in the picture. 

For the Lower Part. — For a rosette, make a large 



*l48e S^tf <""-<^v 


r 


-»L- c> 














■v 








'■> 




*' v - *■"« <>■■ 










\*#*r 






'-■•^y^f- 



No. 85. — Tatted Edging. 



ring of 8 p., each separated by 3 d. s. ; draw up and 
break the thread. Now make a large p. drawn out 
long thus: 4 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 4 
d. s., draw up. A short distance from this make a 
ring of 4 d. s., join to side-picot, 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; now 4 d. s., join to side- 
picot of last ring, 11 d. s.,i p, 4 d. s., draw up. 
Now 3 rings each made thus: 4 d. s., join to side- 
picot, 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; 
then another like the 3rd one made; then 1 like 
the 2nd; tie to the first ring made and fasten neatly 
to the center ring, as seen in the picture. Now 
use the ist large ring made for the top of the ro- 
sette, and join it by 
its p. to the p. be- 
tween the points in 
the 2nd section (see 
picture); then join 
the next 2 rings to 
the next 2 rings in 
the point, as shown 
in the engraving. 

For the Top 
Heading. — Take 2 
threads and join to 
a p. in the top row; 
then make 3 d. s., 1 
p., 3 d. s., join to p. 
in the ring under- 
neath, 3 d. s., 1 p., and repeat in this order across 
the row. Finish the heading by crocheting chains 
of 5 stitches joined to p. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 85. — The edging which is illustrated at No. 
85, is made in the same way as the rosettes in the 



square seen on page 64, where directions for the 
rosettes are given, and at the top the chains and 
rings are worked thus: * Make a ring and join to 
middle p. of chain (see picture), then a chain like 
the one described, and join to a p. of the chain 
underneath (see picture); then another chain, 1 
ringjoin at the second p. to the middle p. of next 
ring, 1 chain, another ring 
joined at the second p. to 
the corresponding p. of last 
ring, and at the 4th p. to the 
middle p. in chain of next 
rosette, and repeat from * 
across the trimming. 

If preferred, a crocheted 
heading may be made at the 
top of this edging in place 
of the one described and 
shown in the picture. 

Tatted Edging of Silk. 

No. 86. — Begin by mak- 
ing all the large loops need- 
ed in the desired length 
of lace, and pin them to- 
gether to avoid their becom- 
ing tangled. 

Each is made as follows: 
10 p. with 2 d. s. between each; draw up and 
fasten; then carry the thread across the back of 
the loop and fasten into the 6th p. A half inch 
from the ist loop make the 2nd loop, and so con- 
tinue. The loops are pulled long instead of round, 
and the lace is worked across the lower side, leav- 
ing the upper 4 p. to be attached to the article to 
be trimmed, which is done by lace stitches. The 
lace stitches also cover the long thread between the 
large loops. 

To the first large loop fasten 2 threads. With the 
shuttle thread make the ist small loop as follows: 
* 5 d. s., join to ist p. of large loop, 5 d. s., draw up, 




No. 86. — Tatted Edging or Silk. 



fasten with 2nd thread. Then with the 2 threads 
make 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., a p., 3 d. s. 
Then with the shuttle thread make a 2nd small 
loop. The pattern repeats from * 3 times more for 

1 scollop. The scollops are joined by 3 d. s., 1 p., 

2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s. The next small 
loop is joined to the ist p. of the next large loop. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



35 



Loop and Leaf Border. 

No. 87. — Use crochet cotton, No. 12, or No. 8, 
according as you desire the border to be fine or 
coarse. 

Make a loop with the shuttle thread, work 7 d. 
s., 1 p., 7 d. s., and draw up; then reverse the work 
and with a second thread, work 3 d. s., 1 p., 9 d. s. ; 
reverse, make a loop with the shuttle thread, do 7 
il. s., join to the p. of the small oval just done, 3 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; make another loop, do 4 
(1. s., join to the p. in last oval, 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 

1 [>., 4 d. s., draw up; * make another loop, do 4 d. 
s., join to the p. in last oval, 8 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 
draw up; make a loop again, do 4 d. s., join to the 
]). in last oval, 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw 
up; again make a loop, do 4 d. s., join to the p. in 
last oval, 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; 
these five ovals forma "leaf;" reverse the work, 
and with the second thread, work 9 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. 
s. ; reverse, m: ke a loop with the shuttle thread, do 
7 d. s., join to the p. in the last oval of the leaf, 7 
d. s., draw up; reverse, and with the second thread, 
work 3 d. s., 1 p., 9 d. s., draw up; reverse, make a 
loop with the shuttle thread, do 7 d. s., join to the 
p. in the last oval of last leaf (where join is already 
made), 3 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; make another 
loop, do 4 d. s., join to p. in the last oval, 3 d. s., 
join to p. in the last but one oval of last leaf, 3 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d., s., and draw up; and continue from * 
for the length you desire the border to be. 

For the Crocheted Heading. — 1 double crochet in 
the p. to the right of the top oval, 3 chain, 1 double 
crochet in the next p., 4 chain, and so on. The 
heading may be made as deep as desired by 
additional rows of crochet. 

Design for Tatted Garter. 

No. 88. — This garter may be of knitting silk in 

any color desired, and is made with 2 threads. 

Begin by making * a ring of 5 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 6 p. 

with 3 d. s. between each one, 5 d. s., close. With 

2 threads make a ch. of 12 d. s., 1 p., 12 d. s., repeat 
from * until, by laying the rings of one side 




No. 87. — Loop and Leap Border. 

close together, you have half enough, then break 
the thread. Make a ring of 5 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 4 
p. with 3 d. s. between each one; join to 2nd p. of 
2nd ring made; 3 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., close; * with 
both threads make a ch. of 12 d. s. and join to p. 
of ch.; 12 d. s. Then with 1 thread make a ring of 
5 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s. and join to 2nd p. of 1st ring 
on opposite side; 3 d. s., 3 p., with 3 d. s. between 



each, 3 d. s.; join to 2nd p. of next ring; 3 d. s., 1 
p., 5 d. s., close. Repeat from * until all the rings 
are joined together, being careful not to twist the 
work and always bring the 2nd thread toward you 
when starting to make a ring, so the chs. will all 
cross the same way. Run silk elastic in and out 
through the center and finish with a bow of ribbon. 
Yellow silk for the tatted portion and black or yel- 
low elastic is a pretty combination for such a garter; 
or, the tatted portion may be of black crochet silk and 
the elastic of any pretty contrasting color desired. 




No. 88 — Design foe Tatted Gaktek. 



This design could also be used as wide beading 
or passementerie, or, with the crossing sections made 
shorter, it could be used as a beading for baby ribbon. 

Eyelet Insertion. 

No. 89. — Thread the shuttle with crochet cotton, 
No. 16, and work with the shuttle thread only. 
Commence with a loop, work 3 d. s., 1 p. and 1 d. 
s. alternately six times, 1 p., 3 d. s., draw up; re- 
verse the work, make a loop, do 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s., draw up; * reverse, make a loop, work 3 d. s., 
join to the last p. of the last large oval, 1 d. s., 1 p. 
and 1 d. s. alternately five times, 1 p., 3 d. s., draw 
up; reverse, make a loop, do 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 
draw up. Always leave a space of }4 of an inch 
of cotton between the loops, and repeat from * for 
the length required. To turn the corner, work 6 of 
the large ovals successively; and when tatting along 
the opposite side join the eyelets together by the 
center picots of the rings, as shown in the illustration. 




Ko. 89.— Eyelet Insertion. 



A length of colored ribbon run in and out through 
the eyelets gives a pretty finish to the insertion. 



36 



TATTING AND NETTING, 



ARTICLES OF USE AND O^NAAENT. 



Tatted Plastron. 

No. i. — The plastron illustrated may be made of 
either silk or cotton. It is here shown made of the 
latter. The plastron is composed of 91 wheels, 




No. 1. — Tatted Plastron. 

which are made separately and then tied together. 
Each wheel is made thus: 

Make a ring of 4 d. s., then 8 p. each separated 
by 4 d. s., then close. Now make a smaller ring a 
short distance from the other, without breaking the 
thread, of 4 d. s., 1 p., then 8 more p. each separ- 
ated by 2 d. s., then 4 d. s., and close. Tie to the 
first p. formed in the ring first made; then make 
another ring like the last one, except that you join 
it to the side p. of the last ring made, after making 
the first 4 d. s. ; then make 8 p. instead of 9, tie in 
the next p. of the center ring, and make 6 more 
rings in the same way, joining the last ring to the 
first small one where the 8th p. would come; and 
after tying to the center ring, tie the two threads 
together and cut off as close as possible. 

In shaping the plastron, begin with one wheel 



and increase one in each row, having the wheels 
come between the ones in the preceding row after 
the second row is tied. Tie the wheels by the cor- 
responding p. of each (see picture). After the 
tenth row is tied, tie 4 rings at each side of the 
center, having the lastoneat each side come beyond 
the ring in the row underneath, then make 3 rows 
more, decreasing one ring in each row. Now make 
16 rings and tie together once at each side, then tie 
to the plastron around the neck edge, leaving 5 
rings free. If a wider band be desired, two rows 
of wheels may be used for the neck instead of one, 
and if the plastron is not large enough, make an- 
other row of rings before tying on the 4 rings at 
each side. 

Design for Tatted Garter. 

No. 2. — This garter should be worked with 
knitting silk, in any color preferred, and is made 
throughout with one thread only. It is com- 
posed of two rows of three-leaved figures turned 
opposite one another. They are worked separately, 
and are joined in working the second row. Work 
2 d. s.; then 9 times alternately, 1 p. and 2 d. s.; 
then 2 d. s.; draw the stitches together and work 
a larger middle-leaf as follows : 2 d. s., join to last 
p. of first leaf, 2 d. s., join to next p., 2 d. s., 
then 13 picots, each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. 
s.; next work another small section like the first 
ring, joining to the last two picots of the large leaf. 
Fasten the thread and cut it off. Repeat from the 



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« K> 35 *S §^\?<&fc3 
siap %» •? R «^ $>** 



No. 2. — Design for Tatted Garter. 



beginning for the desired length, joining the figures 
to each other by the middle p. of each small leaf. 
Work a second row in the same manner, and join 
each middle leaf of one figure to the corresponding 
leaf of the first row (see picture). Run silk-elastic 
in and out through the center, and finish with a 
clasp and a bow of ribbon. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



37 



Tatted Medallion. 
No. 3. — This medallion when worked in 



fine 



linen thread forms handsome ornaments, to be used 
on wash dresses or for any other decorative pur- 
pose. When worked in crochet silk it also forms 
beautiful passementerie. Work the four-leaved fig- 
ure in the center first, as follows: With one thread 
only make 6 d. s., 5 p., each separated by 2 d. s., 
then 6 d. s., and draw the stitches together; work 3 
more similar rings, fasten the thread and cut it off. 
Around this figure work with one thread only, as 
follows: 3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., join to tlie middle p. 
of one of the rings of the four-leaved figure, 2 d. s., 

1 p., 3 d. s., and draw the stitches up; turn the 
work downward, and work a larger ring of 4 d. s., 
5 p., each separated by 2 d. s., then 4 d. s. ; turn 
the work again and work another small ring, but 
make the middle p. complete instead of joining to 
the four-leaved figure. Continue working alter- 
nately large and small rings all round, but between 
the 5th and 6th small rings work 2 large rings 
instead of 1 as between the other rings. This 
forms the oval. Then, after working 5 more small 
rings, join the 6th to the middle p. of the 3rd ring 
of the four-leaved figure; then between the next 
5th and 6th small rings, work 2 large rings without 
turning the work, as at the opposite end. 

The next round is worked with two threads. 
Join between 2 of the larger rings, make 2 d. s., 7 
p., each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s. ; fasten to 
the joining-picot of the next 2 rings, and continue 
all round. The next ring of chains is also worked 
with 2 threads. Join to the middle p. of a chain, 

2 d. s., 7 p., each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s., 



the daintier the effect. It is made entirely of 
small rosettes joined to each other in working. 

To make a Rosette. — Work with 1 thread only, a 
small ring of 1 d. s., 8 p., each separated by 2 d. s., 



lew* 7 **?;*** 5 **?! 






BCg| [.G^M^'lf^*?^: 




Kraflsa 













Xo. 4. — Tatted Handkerchief Border. 



r go J" 




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No. 3.— Tatted Medallion. 

join to the middle p. of the next chain, and con- 
tinue all round. To use the ovals for passementerie 
trimming, join them together by the middle p. of 2 
consecutive corresponding chains on the oval end. 

Tatted Handkerchief Border. 

No. 4. — This pretty border may be worked with 
fine linen or cotton thread — the finer the thread 



then 1 d. s.; draw the stitches together. Fasten the 
thread to 1st p., * and work 4 d. s., 5 p., each 
separated by 2 d. s. ; then 4 d. s., draw the stitches 
together and fasten thread to next p. of the middle 
ring; repeat from * until there are 8 rings, but 
instead of forming 1st p. of each, join to last p. of 
previous ring; and when the rosette is completed, 
instead of forming last p. of the last ring, join to 
1st p. of the 1st ring made. Tie the threads 
securely and cut them off closely. Now work a 
round of scollops with 2" threads as follows: Join 
thread to a p. that connects 2 rings, 2 d. s., 7 p., 
each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s., join to next 
connecting p., and repeat all round. This com- 
pletes the rosette. 

Work as many more as are required to edge one 
side of the handkerchief, joining them to each other 
in working the scollops by the middle p. of 2 con- 
secutive scollops. Now work another row in the 
same way, joining them together as made, and also 
to the row already made by 2 consecutive scollops. 
Work the other sides of the handkerchief in the 
same way. After the border is all completed, baste 
it on stiff paper, and with a fine needle and thread 
fill up the open spaces between the rosettes with 
small wheels, as in drawn work, or with lace 
stitches, as preferred. 



38 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Tatted Jabot. 

No. 5. — This pretty jabot may be worked with 
fine linen thread, or with silk, as preferred. The 
4 rosettes are worked first. 

Commence with the little five-leaved figure which 




No. 5. — Tatted Jabot. 

is worked with 1 thread. Make 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., 
draw the stitches together, and close to the ring 
just made, work 4 more similar rings; fasten the 
thread neatly and securely and cut it off. 

The next round is worked alternately with 
1 and with 2 threads. Work first with 1 thread 
a ring of 4 d. s., 7 p., with 2 d. s. between 
each, then 4 d. s., and draw the stitches to- 
gether; * turn the ring downward and with 
both threads work a small scollop of 7 d. s.; 
turn the work back again and with 1 thread 
make a ring as before, but instead of .forming 

1 st p., join to last p. of previous ring; turn 
downward and with both threads work 4 d. s., 
and join to one of the p. of the small five-leaved 
figure; 4 d. s.; turn the work back again, and 
with 1 thread make another ring. Repeat 
from * all round and join last ring to first 
one made. 

Lastly, work the scollops on the outer edge 
of the rosette. In doing this, * join the thread 
to the p. which forms the connection between 
the adjacent rings of the round just worked, 
and with both threads make a scollop of 2 d. 
s., 13 p., with 2 d. s. between each ; then 

2 d. s. Repeat from * all round. 

Work 3 more rosettes and join them to each other 
when working the outer scollops, by 2 successive 



scollops. This leaves an open space in the center 
with 1 scollop from each rosette turning toward the 
center. Fill the open space with a small figure 
worked as follows: With 1 thread make 7 d. s., 1 
p., 7 d. s. and draw the stitches together; work 3 
more similar rings close to this, fasten thread and 
cut it off. With 2 threads work a scollop around 
this; join to a p. of this four-leaved figure and to the 
middle p. of one of the scollops of a rosette; 2 d. 
s., 5 p. with 2 d. s. between each, 2 d. s., and join 
to p. of next leaf, and middle p. of next scollop, 
and repeat all round. 

The tabs are worked last and are attached to the 
lower rosette. There are 4 of the four-leaved figures 
in each tab worked with 1 thread as described for 
the center. Rings and scollops are worked all 
round these four-leaved figures. Take both threads 
and join to a p. of a four-leaved figure; work 3 d. 
s., turn it over so that the purled edge is toward you, 
and * with 1 thread work a ring of 2 d. s., 5 p., 
with 2 d. s. between each, 2 d. s. and draw the 
stitches together; turn the work downward, and 
with both threads work 3 d. s., and join to p. of next 
leaf of the four-leaved figure; 3 d. s., turn the work 
back again, and repeat from * all round, joining the 
rings to each other as they are made. To form the 
round effect at each end of a tab, work 3 scollops 
without joining to the figures. Work 2 more tabs, 
joining them in working to the lower scollops of the 
rosette as shown in the illustration. 

Tatted Collar. 

No. 6. — Use fine cotton and work as follows: 
Make a ring of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 
p., 4 d. s., and close; * leave a short length of 
thread and make 4 d. s., join to side p. of ring, 4 
d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., and close. Repeat 
from * until there are 84 rings; fasten thread around 
in middle p. of last ring, turn, join 2nd thread and 




No. 6.— Tatted Collar. 



make * 7 d. 
middle p 



in 



s., 1 p., 7 
of next 



d. s. 
ring- 



skip 1 ring, and fasten 
Repeat from * until 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



89 



there are 42 chs. ; turn and make * 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 
d. s., and join to p. of ch.; repeat from * until 
there are 42 chs.; turn and make * 9 d. s., 1 p., 9 
d. s. and join to p. of ch.; repeat from * until there 
are 41 chs., then turn, and make the edge around 
the top, as follows. With 1 thread make 4 d. s., 1 
p., 3 d. s., 6 p., alternately 3 d. s. and 4 d. s., and 
close; fasten to ch., 4 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join to 2nd 
p. of ring, 3 d. s., 5 p., alternately 3 d. s. and 4 d. 
s., and close. Make a ring at the corner, joining to 
1st p. of last ring; skip 2 small rings, fasten to ch., 
make another large ring fastening it to 1st p. of last 
large ring; * make another and fasten where 2nd p. 
should come, to 2nd p. of last ring. Repeat from 
* until the other end of the collar is reached, and 
make that like first end described, always skipping 
2 small rings and fastening thread in next short ch. 

For the Wheels at the Bottom. — Make 2 d. s., 1 p., 
2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s.,and close; turn, and 
close to this make 4 d. s., 7 p., with 3 d. s. between 
each one, 4 d. s., and close. * Turn and make 2 
d. s., join to p. of small ring, 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 
p., 2 d. s., and close; turn and make 4 d. s., join to 
1st p. of large ring, 3 d. s., 6 p., with 3 d. s. between 
each, 4 d. s. and close. Repeat from * until there 
are 8 large and 8 small rings, join to form a wheel, 
fasten, and break thread. 

Three of these wheels are joined to form a point. 
The engraving shows how they are joined. 

Tatted Border for Center-Piece 
for Table. 

No. 7. — Work the four-leaved figures with one 
thread, thus: 5 d. s., 5 p., with 2 d. s. between 
each; 5 d. s., close up and work 3 more similar 



above. Then with 2 threads work the scollops thus: 
Join to the middle p. of one of the four-leaved fig- 
ures; 2 d. s., 11 p., with 2 d. s. between each, 2 d. 
s., * join to middle p. of next ring of same figure, 




No. 7.— Tatted Border for Cester-Piece for Table 

rings. In working the last ring, leave the middle 
p. twice as long as the others; as the last ring 
of each four-leaved figure is joined to this p., tie 
the ends of thread and cut off. Work 3 more of 
the four-leaved figures, joining them as described 




No. 8. — Tatted Rosette. 

and to the middle of opposite ring of next figure; 
2 d. s., 11 p., with 2 d. s. between each, 2 d. s., join 
to middle p. of next ring of same figure. Repeat 
from * all round. Tie the ends of the thread at 
the starting point and cut them off. This com- 
pletes the rosettes. 

The rosettes are joined to each other in working 
the scollops, and the open spaces between the ro- 
settes are filled in with four-leaved figures worked 
with one thread, as follows: 6 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
join to 4th p. of a scollop, 2 d. s., join the 2nd p. 
of the connecting scollop, 2 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. ; draw 
the stitches together and work 3 more rings, join- 
ing the scollops in the same manner. 

Tatted Rosette. 

No. 8. — Make a small ring of 5 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. 
s., 1 very long p. (see picture), 3 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 
draw up ; leave about an eighth of an inch of 
thread, then make a large ring thus : 2 d. s., 1 
p., 4 d. s., then 5 p., each separated by 2 d. s. ; 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 2 d. s., draw up ; now make another small 
ring, joining it after the 1st 5 d. s., to the p. of the 
opposite small ring, then another large ring, and 
join that to the 1st p. of the last large ring, after 
making the 1st 2 d. s. Repeat in this way until 
there are 20 rings of each ; then join the last ones 
made to the first ones, to make a circle (see 
picture), and take a needle and thread and pass 
through the long p., drawing them up closely, as 
shown in the engraving. 

For the Small Square at the Top. — Use two 
threads. With 1 thread make a ring of 3 d. s., 1 p., 



40 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



3 d. s., then 4 p., each separated by 3 d. s., then 3 
d. s. ; draw up. With 2 threads turn the work and 
make a ch. of 7 d. s., and repeat rings and chs. 
until there are 4 of each ; then tie the last ch. 
closely to the 1st ring, and join by a center p. of 
one of the small rings to a middle 



instead of forming the 5th p., join to the p. of one 
of the larger rings in the former round; turn the 
work and with both threads work a scollop of 2 d. 
s., 7 p., each separated by 2 d. s.; finally 2 d. s.; 
turn the work and repeat from *. 



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Handkerchief Border in 












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Tatting. 






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No. 9. — This handsome hand- 










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kerchief border may be made with 




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linen or cotton thread in numbers 




aH 








:i?i"J 


ranging from No. 60 to No. 100, 










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as preferred. It is worked alter- 




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I'JMj- t' / ^BBfc < TVS 


nately with 1 and 2 threads. Begin 








i^y 


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the border by working the inside 












row of four-leaved figures, as fol- 




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lows: With 1 thread work a ring 


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2v*-w^b?3 


of 7 d' s., 1 p., 7 d. s.; close the 




t»™, JKft 








MB 4J iBBJB ^^^.*bH 


stitches in a ring. Close to this 














make a ring of 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. 


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No. 9. — Haxdkerchief Border in Tatting. 



s.; next a ring of 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s. ; then a 
ring of 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. This completes one 
figure. Fasten the thread and cut it off. Work 
as many more of these four-leaved figures as are 
needed to go all round the edge of the handker- 
chief, joining them to each other by the smaller 
rings; the corners will be formed in the next round. 
The next round is worked alternately with 1 and 
2 threads. * With 1 thread, work a ring of 3d. s.; 
9 p. each separated by 2 d. s., then 3 d. s., but 



To form the corners of the handkerchief, join 2 
of the rings by the middle p. to the same p. of the 
four-leaved figure, and the scollop which separates 
the corner rings; work with n p. instead of 7 p. as 
in the other scollops. 

The next round consists of three-leaved 
and scollops, and is also worked with 1 



figures 
and 2 
threads. Begin with the three-leaved figure, using 
but 1 thread. Work a ring of * 2 d. s., 7 p. each 
separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s., close the stitches, 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



•il 



and work 2 more similar rings close to this; but in 
working the 2nd ring join the middle p. of the 
scollops of the previous row. After working »he 
3rd ring, fasten to the 1st ring where closed; turn 
the work upside down and with both threads work 
a scollop of 2 d. s., and 7 times, alternately, 1 p., 2 
il. s.; turn the work back again and repeat 
from *. The three-leaved figures, however, 
must be joined to each other by the middle p. 
of each outer leaf. In forming the corners, 
3 of the three-leaved figures are joined to the 
corner scollop of previous row, the 1st to 2nd 
p., the 2nd to 6th p., and 3rd to 10th p., the 
2nd figure not being joined to 1st and 3rd; 
and the 2 corner scollops should each have 9 p. 
Now follows a round of rosettes. With 1 
thread work a ring of 1 d. s., 1 p., * 2 d. s., 

1 p.; repeat from * until you have S p., with 

2 d. s. between each; 1 d. s.; close up the 
stitches. Join the thread to the 1st p., and 
work a ring as follows, leaving a very short 
space of thread: 4 d. s.. 1 p., * 2 d. s., 1 p.; 
repeat from * until there are 7 p.; then 4 d. s., 
close the stitches, join thread to next p. of 
center ring; 4 d. s., join to last p. of previous 
ring; 2 d. s., then 6 p. each separated by 2 




No. 10. — End or Fichd in Tattino. 

d. s. ; then 4 d. s., close up the stitches. Repeat 
until there are 8 rings around the center one, and 
join last ring to 1st. 

For the outer scollops around the rosettes, use 
both threads. Fasten the thread to the middle p. 
of one of the rings, * 2 d. s., 5 times alternately, 1 



p., 2 d. s. ; fasten in middle p. of next ring, and re- 
peat from * all around. Join the rosettes to the 
scollops of the previous round, as you work, by the 
middle p. of each 2 scollops, except the corner 
rosette, which must be joined between 2 scollops of 
the previous round. The rosettes must also join 




No. 11.— Back op Fichu in Tatting. 

each other by middle p. of 2 corresponding scollops 
on each. 

Three rounds of scollops now complete the 
border, worked as follows, with both threads: 
* Fasten thread to the middle p. of 1st free upper 
ring, 2 d. s. ; 5 times alternately, 1 p., 2 d. s. ; join 
in middle p. of next scollop; 2 d. s., 5 times 
alternately 1 p., 2 d. s.; join the next 2 scollops, and 
repeat from * all round. 

The next 2 rounds are also worked with both 
threads, 2 d. s. ; 7 times alternately 1 p., 2 d. s., join to 
the middle p. of each scollop and repeat all round. 

Fichu in Tatting. 

Nos. 10 and n. — These two engravings show 
the middle and one end of a narrow fichu of tatting. 
The whole fichu is about forty-three inches long 
and is made of medium-fine thread. 

To make the Wheels. — Make a center ring for 
each, composed of 10 d s. and 9 p. 

For the outer row of rings for each wheel, make 
each ring as follows: 7 d. s., then 7 p., each 
separated by 1 double; then 7 d. s., joining the rings 
at the lowest side p. in the ordinary manner. Join 
the 12 rings in a circle, and unite to the center ring 
by two rows of rick-rack stitch, as seen in the 
engravings. 

To make the small Four-Leaved Figures. — For 
each ring: 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., and arrange the rings 
in the shape represented. 



42 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



To make the large Four-Leaved Figures. — For 
each ring: 7 d. s., 5 p. each separated by 1 double, 
7 d. s. and close. Arrange and tie as seen in the 
engraving. 

To make the Upper Edge. — Make a row of single 
rings, each formed as follows: 10 d. s. and 9 p. 




No. 12.— Postal-Card Case. 

alternating. Having made all the parts described, 
join them with a needle and thread by knottings, 
as seen in the engravings, which show how to turn 
the point at the back and complete the ends. The 
single rings between the wheels and four-leaved 
figures are like those along the upper edges. 

Postal-Card Case. 

No. 12. — This dainty case is designed both for 
use and ornament, and is made of a piece of rib- 
bon stretched over card-board, to which silk tatting 
is tacked to form the pocket for holding the cards. 

To make the Center Ring of Wheel with very long 
Picots. — Make 1 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 
3 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., draw up and tie. With 2 threads 
work * 5 p. with 2 d. s. between, join to p. of center 



d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up, pass thread through 
next p.; repeat from * until the circle is complete. 

For the Large Ring. — * Make 10 d. s. ; 1 p., 10 
d. s., draw up; pass thread through p. of small ring. 
Repeat from * for circle. 

For Outer Row. — Make 4 d. s., 1 p., * 4 d. s., 1 
p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw; working as close to 
ring as possible, 4 d. s., fasten to last p. made, 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw; working with 2 
threads, 4 d. s., join to p. of large ring, 4 d. s. 

For Third Ring. — 4 d. s., join to last p. made, 4 
d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., i p., 4 d. s., draw; with 2 threads, 
4 d. s., jain to p. of large ring, 4 d. s. 

For Fourth Ring. — 4 d. s., join to last p.; repeat 
from * in outer row. Make 4 large wheels; join 
with quatrefoil of large rings of 10 d. s., 1 p., 10 
d. s., with 10 d. s. worked with 2 threads between. 
Fill in each outer space with a trefoil worked in 
same manner as the quatrefoil just described. 

Tatted Square. 

No. 13. — This square is pretty for decorating 
necktie ends, scarfs, throws, tidies, etc. 

Begin the squares from the center, working with 
one thread only a four-leaved figure as follows: 6 
d. s,, 7 p., each separated by 3 d. s., then 6 d. s., and 
draw the stitches together; close to this work 3 
similar sections, then tie the ends of thread securely 
and cut off. Work 4 more of the four-leaved 
figures, and join them to the middle figure as shown 
by the illustration, joining to the 1st and last p. of 
2 sections of the middle figure, instead of forming 
the middle p. of one of the 4 sections in working 
each figure. 

Next work with 2 threads the outer row of the 
square in the following manner: * With 1 thread 
work 1 section of 6 d. s., 3 p., each separated by 3 




No. 13.— Tatted Square. 



d. 



s. 
in one 



then 
of 



ring; repeat from * till you have gone 
ring; draw the thread through the last 



around the 
work * 



3 d. s., join to the middle p. of a section 
the 4 figures worked last; 3 d. s., 3 p., 
each separated by 3 d. s., then 6 d. s. and draw the 
stitches together. Close to this make 1 section like 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



43 



the preceding, but join to a section of the next 
figure; turn the work and with both threads work i 
scollop of 3 d. s., 7 [)., each separated by 3 d. s., 
then 3 d. s. ; turn the work, and 3 times alternately 
make 1 leaflet worked with 1 thread, and 1 scollop 
worked with 2 threads like the preceding one, 
joining the sections to the four-leaved figures as 
shown by the illustration. Repeat from * all 
around, fasten the last 
scollop between 2 sec- 
tions, tie the threads 
and cut off closely. 

Card or Work Bas- 
ket in Tatting, 
with Detail. 

Nos. 14 and 16. — 
The framework of this 
basket may be of wicker 
or wire. It is covered 
with rosettes in tatting, 
which may be worked 
with colored crochet 
cotton or knitting silk. 
The tatting, worked 

with ecru cotton or silk, and lined with pale-blue 
silk, would be very pretty; or red cotton, lined with 
cream, would look we'l. The rosettes are joined 
together to form the sections, according to the shape 
and size of the basket, and are divided and edged 
by lines of closed rings. 

One of the rosettes is shown at figure No. 14. In 
working it, begin in the center with a closed 
ring, made as follows: * 1 d. s., 1 p., repeat from * 
9 times more, 1 d. s., close. The p. here is the 
loop of thread left between two single knots, and 



following closed rings, draw through the last p. of 
previous closed ring; repeat from * 9 times more. 
Fasten off the cotton neatly and securely at the 
back of the work. To join the rosettes draw 
the cotton through the top p. of a closed ring of 





No. 14. 



No. 16. 




No. 15 — Rosette or Tatting. 

the ring is really composed of 10 regular p. made 
in the usual way as above described. For the outer 
closed rings draw the cotton through the 1st p., 
work * 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 4 p., each separated by 
2 d. s. ; 4 d. s., close, draw through the 1st p. of 
closed ring. When working the 1st p. of 2nd and 



Nos. U and 16. — Card or Work Basket in Tattinq, with Detail. 



one rosette, when working corresponding p. of next 
rosette. For the lines of closed rings edging the 
sections, work 5 d. s., 7 p. each separated by 2 d. s., 
5 d. s. ; close. When working the 4th p. on 2nd 
and following closed rings, draw through the pre- 
vious ring where it closes. The cotton between the 
rings must be rather more than half an inch in 
length. The tatting is sewed to the basket with a 
needle and fine cotton. The inside of the basket 
is lined with blue silk, edged with a ruche of rib- 
bon. Ribbon bows are placed above the handles 
of the basket. 

Rosette of Tatting. 

No. 15. — This rosette may be worked with fine 
or coarse cotton, as preferred. It is very handsome 
when worked in silk for decorating dresses, bags, 
chair-scarfs, etc., etc. 

Begin with the middle ring and work 1 <L s.; 
then 10 long p., each separated by 2 d. s., and lastly 
1 d. s. ; close in a ring, fasten and cut the thread. 

The row following is worked with 2 threads. 
* Work first with 1 thread only, a ring, as follows : 
5 d. s., join to a p. of the middle ring, 5 d. s. ; close 
in a ring and then turn the work and work with 2 
threads close to the end of the ring, as follows : 
5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. ; repeat from *g times more, and 
then fasten the thread to the 1st ring and cut it off. 

Next make the circle of 3-leaved figures, which 
are worked separately, but are joined to each 
other and to the scollops of the preceding round 
by the p. Each of the 2 side leaves of each figure 
have s d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s.; 
leaf has 5 d. s. ; join to last p. of 1st 
join to scollop of middle part, 7 d. s., 
The ether side leaf is worked like the 



the middle 
leaf, 7 d. s. 
1 p., 5 d. s. 
1st one. 
The outer 



row is also worked with 2 threads. 



Work rst * a ring with 1 thread as follows: 14 d. 



44 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



s., fasten to the p. of the ist or left-hand side leaf 
of a 3-leaved figure, 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s.; then turn 
the work and work with 2 threads 8 times 
alternately 2 d. s., 1 p.; then 2 d. s.; turn the work 
and work again with 1 thread a ring as follows : 7 
d. s., join to the p. of the preceding ring ; 7 d. s., 




No. 17. — Collar in Tatting. 

join to the next side leaf of a 3-leaved figure; 14 
d. s., turn the work, work a scollop with both 
threads like the preceding one. Repeat the details 
from * all round. 

Collar in Tatting. 

No. 17. — Use very fine thread. There are 19 
wheels in the collar. To make a wheel : Make 
a ring of 12 d. s. alternating with 12 long p., and 
fasten off. Now make a small ring as follows: 4 d. 
s., catch to a long p., 4 more d. s., and close. 

Then turn the work over and make a larger ring 
as follows: 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. ; 5 p., each separated 
by 1 d. s. ; 2 d. s,, 1 p., 2 d. 
the work and make another 
other large one, but instead 
join to the last p. of the ist 
order all round the center ring. 



other lower ring, joining the latter to the adjoin- 
ing rings as before; now another upright ring, 
and then a large ring as follows: 3 d. s., and join 
to the last p. of the small adjoining ring; 2 d. 
s.; 8 p., each separated by 1 d. s.; 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 
d. s., and close the ring. Follow these' details 
across the row as seen in 
the engraving. 

To Make the Upper Row. 
— The large and small rings 
are made the same as those 
on the row just described, 
and are joined as seen in the 
engraving. 

To Finish the Upper Edge 
and Shape the Collar. — Work 
with two threads, making 5 
d. s. between each joining to 
a p. The thread for the left 
hand is not carried around 
it in the usual way, but is 
wrapped about the little 
finger, so that a straight line 
of d. s. may be kept the 
whole length of the collar. 
The latter is finally curved 
into shape by the shuttle thread. 

Rosette in Tatting. 

No. 18. — For this rosette 2 threads are used. 

Begin in the center with 1 thread and work 1 d. 
s., 1 p., * 2 d. s., 1 p.; repeat from * until you have 
8 p.; then 1 d. s., and close the stitches in a ring. 
Join the thread to the nearest p., and work a ring 
as follows: 4 d. s., 1 p., * 2 d. s., 1 p., repeat from 
* until you have 7 p., then 4 d. s; close the stitches 



and close. Turn 
small ring; then an- 
of making the ist p., 
ring. Repeat in this 
In making the next 



wheel join it to the ist one by two of its opposite 
p., as seen in the engraving. 

To make the row above the Wheels. — Make a small 
ring as follows: 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., and join at the 
right hand end of the wheels at the middle p. of 
the ring which would come next to a joining of the 
wheels (see engraving); 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., and 
close. Now, for the beginning of the collar only, 
turn the work and make an extra upright ring of 4 
d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., and 4 d. s. 
Then turn the work and make another lower ring, 
joining it to the first lower ring of the row and to 
the next ring of the wheel, as seen in the picture; 
turn again and make a second upper ring like the 
one described for the end of the collar, and as illus- 
trated here, joining it to the first upright ring; turn, 
make a third lower ring, joining it to the second ring 
of the row and to the third one of the wheel; then 
another upright ring, joining it as before, and an- 




No. 13. — Rosette in Tatting. 

and fasten the thread in the next p. of the middle 
ring, 4 d. s. ; join to the last p. of the preceding 
ring, * 2 d. s., 1 p.; repeat from * to form 6 p.; 4 
d. s. ; close the stitches. Continue until you have 
8 rings around the center ring, and join the last 
ring to the first. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



45 



Around this circle make a round of 8 4-leaved 
figures, as follows: 4 d. s., 1 p., * 2 d. s., 1 p.; 
repeat from * until you have 5 p., and 4 d. s. ; close 
the stitches. No space of thread is left between 
the 4 leaves or rings, and the leaves are not joined 
together. The mid- 
dle p. of 1st ring is 
joined to the middle 
p. of 1 st ring in cen- 
ter wheel, and the 
figures are joined to 
each other by the 
middle p. of 2nd 
ring. For the outer 
edge 2 threads are 
required. Join the 
2 threads to the 4th 
p. of the 2nd ring in 
the 1 st 4-leaved fig- 
ure, * 2 d. s., 1 p.; 
repeat from * until 
you have 5 p., and 2 
d. s. Turn the work 
and join to the mid- 
dle p. in the top ring 
of the same figure; 
then 3 d. s., 1 p., * 
2 d. s., 1 p.; repeat 
from * until you have 
5 p.; turn and join 
to the 2nd p. of last 
ring of the same fig- 
ure ; 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 
d. s. ; turn, join to 
the 4th p. in the 2nd 
ring of next figure. 
Continue in this way 
around the wheel. 

Tatted Fichu. 

No. 19 — This ela- 
borate piece of work is made of No. 90 cotton, the settes, and are also pretty for children's dress yokes 
finest thread with which tatting can satisfactorily or chemise yokes, with small 4-leaved figures filled 
be made. The work is done with two threads. in between. The rosette is worked as follows: 




No. 19.— Tatted Fiohtj. 



tinue as before till you have 8 outer rings, each of 
which has been joined to the last p. of the preceding 
one. 1 8 of these small wheels are required, which are 
joined to the straight row, as shown in the illustration. 
The large wheel consists of a center ring of 1 2 p. with 

2 d. s. between each; 
cut the thread. Make 
* 7 d. s., join to p. 
of center ring, 7 d. 
s., draw; 5 d. s., 7 p. 
with 2 d. s. between, 
7 d. s., draw; re- 
peat from *, joining 
always the outer row 
of rings to last p. of 
previous ring, in- 
stead of making 1st 
p. 70 of these 
wheels are required, 
and are joined by 
quatrefoih. To make 
these quatrefoih, 4 
large rings are em- 
ployed and are con- 
nected by 5 d. s. 
worked with two 
threads. 

In fitting the points 
it will be found that 
the spaces must be 
filled in with small 
wheels and rings 
joined by the two 
threads. 

Small Tatted 
Rosette. 

No. 20. — These 
small rosettes are 
pretty for filling in 
between large ro- 



Begin with the part worked with 
the two threads, thus: 

First Ring. — 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 
1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. ; draw. Work 
with two threads, 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. 

Second Ring. — 5 d. s., join to last 
p. of 1st ring; 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 
1 p., 5 d. s., draw; then work with 
two threads as before. Continue 
till you have made 71 rings, each 
one of which is joined to the last p. 
of the preceding ring. Reverse the 
work and proceed as before, but in- 
stead of making a p. with two threads, 
join to p. of preceding two threads. 

The smallwheel consists of acenterring of 1 d. s.,* 1 
p., 3 d. s. *; repeat between the stars till you have 8 p.; 
make 2 d. s., draw, pass thread through 1st p. and 
begin 1st ring; 5 d. s., 7 p. with 2 d. s. between, 5 d. 
s., draw, and join to 2nd p. of middle ring; then con- 




No. 20.— Small Tatted Rosette. 



Work the center ring with 1 thread 
only, 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., then 13 
more p., each separated by 3 d. s.; 
finally 1 d. s., draw the stitches to- 
gether in a ring, fasten the thread 
and cut it off. The next round is 
worked with 2 threads as follows : 
With 1 thread work a ring of 7 d. s., 
join to a p. of the ring first worked; 
7 d. s., draw up together ; turn the 
work, * and with both threads work 
a scollop of 2 d. s., 7 p., each separ- 
ated by 2 d. s., finally 2 d. s. Turn 
the work and with 1 thread work a 
ring as before, joining to the same 
p. the 1st ring was joined to ; without turning 
work make another similar ring, missing the next 
p. and joining to the next following. Turn the 
work and repeat from * all round. After complet- 
ing the circle fasten the threads and cut them off. 



46 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Corner of Tatted Handkerchief. 

No. 21. — The tatting for this handkerchief is 
made of very fine thread, and consists of various 
wheels and figures, which are made separately and 
then tied together. 

The linen-lawn center of the handkerchief is three 
and three-fourth inches square, and a tiny tatted 
beading surrounds it, each ring being made thus: 

Make 3 d. s., then 8 p. each separated by 3 d. s., 
draw up, tie the two threads, and cut off as closely 
as possible; make another ring like the last, but join 
to the 1st ring instead of making the 4th p.; then 
make 4 p. after the joining is made. Continue until 



Now take 2 threads and tie in the center p. of a 
ring, and make a ch. of 6 d. s. ; then with 1 thread 
make a tiny ring of 2 d. s., 5 p., each separated by 
2 d. s., then 2 d. s., and close; now with 2 threads, 
make a ch. of 3d. s. ; then 2 more rings separated 
by the 3-d. s. ch. ; then make the 6-d. s. ch. ; tie to 
the center p. of next ring, and repeat in every ring; 
then tie the last two threads neatly together. Next, 
make with the shuttle only, * 7 d. s., tie in the 
center p. of the middle ring in the group of 3, 7 d. 
s., and close; turn the work, and make a large ring 
of 3 d. s., 7 p., each separated by 3 d. s. ( 3 d. s., and 
close; make another small ring, joining it to the 
next group; then a large ring like the one made 




No. 21. — Corner of Tatted Handkerchief. 



the strip is as long as one side of the square, then 
make 3 more strips and tie so that when joined a 
ring will come at each corner, and there will be 16 
rings between the corner rings at each side. Sew 
this to the square by the center p. of each ring. 
Next make the large wheels, each one being made 
thus: Make a ring of 8 d. s., then 5 p., each 
separated by 3 d. s., then 8 d. s., and draw up; 
close to this make another ring like the last, but join 
it after making the 1st 8 d. s. to the side p. of last 
ring; continue in this way until you have 6 rings 
drawn out long instead of round, and when you 
make the last ring, join it to the 1st ring instead of 
making the last p.; tie the threads neatly and break. 



before, but join this where the 2nd p. would come, 
to the corresponding p. of large ring; now make 
another small ring, then a ring like the large one, 
except that you make 2 more p. in it, and repeat 
from * around the center. Make 12 of these wheels 
and join them as seen in the picture, also tying 
them to the beading (see picture). Next make the 
wheels which are tied between the large wheels. 
These are made like the 1st part of the large ones, 
except that the rings between the chs. have 7 long 
p. instead of 5; tie 1 of these between every 2 of 
the large wheels, and 1 on each corner. Next make 
the figures which surround the last rings, which are 
made in long and short strips and joined to each 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



47 



other as made. Make 4 strips having 7 figures in 
each, S strips having 4 figures in each, and 4 strips 
having 3 figures. Each figure is made of 8 d. s., 
then 3 p., each separated by 8 d. s., then 8 d. s., and 
close. Make 3 more rings like the last one, close 
together, then tie the threads closely and firmly to 
preserve the shape. Make another figure and join 
it at the middle p. of one ring, and continue until 
the strip is long enough. In tying these strips to 
the wheels, tie a long strip around each corner, then 
Like the one having 4 figures and tie around the 
next wheel (see picture), and so continue; the one 
having only 3 figures will come between the last 4 
strips and the next corner. 

For the outer row of wheels, make 16 wheels, 
each made thus: Make a large ring of 3 d. s., then 
10 p., each separated by 3 d. s., and draw up; break 
the thread and tie strongly and neatly. Now make 



2 points, is composed of 34 small figures and 9 
rings, which are all tied together after they arc- 
made, as seen in the picture. Silk is the material 
generally used for making the decoration, black or 
any preferred design being suitable. Each of 32 
figures is made thus: With 1 thread make a ring of 
5 d. s., then 8 p. each separated by 5 d. s. and draw 
up. Now with 2 threads make a ch. of 7 d. s., then 
4 p. each separated by 4 d. s., then 7 d. s., skip 1 p. 
in the ring and tie in the next one, which should be 
the 2nd p. made. Now make 3 more chs. like the 
last one and tie in every 2nd p. of ring, thus making 
4 chs., and tying the last ch. in the last p. made in 
the ring; then tie the 4 threads neatly together to 
fasten them, and cut off closely. Make each of the 
other 2 figures of the 34, which are the bottom 
ones of the points, the same as the other 32, except 
that in 1 of the 4 chs. you make 5 p. instead of 4, 




No. 22. — Tatted Decoration for a Fancy Bag. 



* 7 d. s., tie to a p. in center ring, then 7 d. s., and 
close; turn the work and make a ring a short dis- 
tance from the other of 3 d. s., 7 p., each separated 
by 3 As., 3 d. s., and close; turn and make another 
small ring, then a large ring, but make 2 more p. in 
it than are in the last, and join at the 2nd p. to the 
corresponding p. of 1st large ring, and repeat from 

* until there are 10 rings; then tie neatly, and also 
tie the last large ring to the rst large ring. For 
each corner make wheels like those just made, 
except that you only make 8 large rings, omitting 
the last 2, and thus allowing the wheel to fit over 
the center ring at each corner; tie to the last row, 
as shown in the picture. Make the p. all long, as 
this will add greatly to the beauty of the work. 

Tatted Decoration for a Fancy Bag. 
No. 22.— This design, which is in the form of 



and in joining to the others the 5 p. come at the 
bottom. Make each of the 9 rings, which are used 
to fill in the vacant spaces at the top and also at 
each side, the same as the 1st ring is made. Tie 
each figure by the 1st and 4th p. of a ch. to the 
corresponding p. of another figure, to form 2 points 
as seen in the engraving. There are 6 figures in 
each point, and above the points 4 straight rows of 
figures, 2 of which have 5 figures and the other 2 
rows 6 figures. This leaves 2 open spaces at each 
side, and these spaces are each filled by a ring 
which is tied to the outer p. of 2 figures, 1 p. in the 
ring being skipped between each tying; the rings 
across the top are tied in the same manner. By 
using the picture as a guide the shape may very 
easily be formed. The decoration should be made 
first, and the bag it is to ornament should be cut to 
fit it. 



48 



TATTING AND NETTING. 




No. 23. — Tatted Cape Made in a Convent in Ireland. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



49 



Tatted Wheel. 

No. 24. — To make a wheel like the illustration, 
use No. 70 cotton thread. Begin with the center 
by making * 1 d. s. and 1 long p.; repeat from * 
until you have 25 long p.; draw up and fasten. 

Make the outside loops as follows : 4 d. s., 1 p., 
4 d. s.; fasten to one of the long p. of center ; 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d. s. ; draw up. Turn and make an out- 
side loop, leaving about a quarter of an inch of 
thread between. Make 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., * 
2 d. s., 1 p.; repeat from * 3 times more; 3 d. s., 1 
p., 3 d. s. ; draw up. Repeat these 2 rows of 
loops all round the center, fastening them as you 
work to the preceding loop, as seen in the picture. 

The long p. of the center are five-eighths of an 
inch long. The p. of the outside row are an eighth 
of an inch long. 

Tie-End in Tatting. 

No. 25. — In making this tie-end the rosettes are 
made first as follows: 

Make the center ring, which consists of 30 
stitches and 12 p., 2^ stitches being made between 
the p. After fastening the ends and cutting off the 
threads, begin the 1st row by making a ring of 8 
stitches and 3 p., (2 stitches, then a p.) and repeat 
till complete, attaching middle p. to p. of center 
ring. Then draw up. Leave about an eighth of an 
inch of thread before beginning the 2nd ring, which 
consists of 16 stitches and 3 p. (4 stitches between 
the p.) Make a 2nd small ring, attaching 1st p. to 
3rd p. of 1st small ring, as well as attaching it to 
center ring. Attach 2nd large ring to 1st, by p. as 
seen in pattern. When 12 rings of each size are 
finished, fasten the thread, and begin on 3rd and 
4th rows. Make small rings as before, attaching 
every other one to ring of last row. 




No. 24. — Tatted Wheel. 



For the bars on end of tie, and for the neck: 
Make an edge, same as outside row of rosettes, con- 
taining alternate large and small rings outside, and 
small ones inside. Turn when long enough, and 
attach rows of small rings by their p.; and as each 




The outside row has alternate small and large 
rings, with p. between every 2 stitches of large rings. 
Attach rosettes to each other as seen in design. 



No. 25. — Tie-End in Tatting. 

bar is finished, attach to rosette as in design. After 
the 1st bar, the others are attached to it. The out- 
side bars require to be a little longer than the inside 
3 bars. 

Tatted Baisy-Cap. 

Nos. 26 and 27. — This cap is for a young in- 
fant. As the child grows the cap can readily be 
enlarged by working round each piece a row like 
that which forms the outer one of the ovals in the 
center-piece. It is made of No. 70 lace thread. 
For the center-piece make a wheel as follows: 
Center ring. — Make 12 p. with 2 d. s. between; 
draw up and tie. 



50 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



First ring. — * 12 d. s., join to p. of center ring, 
12 d. s., draw. 

Second ring. — 12 d. s., 1 p., 12 d. s., draw; repeat 
from * and continue till all the p. have been used. 







mi 


f, 

is 
m 


p^fPuu to 9 v dlH^ralr 






A~Tvcr &WV' *!**&£ (V> ' # c* 

uTi> .>*^-. - - *UK T >-?■ " -\\\-\AA-'-; <_*; r-t> 





No. 26.— Side of Tatted Baby-Cap. 

Next round: First ring. — 6 d. s., 1 p., * 6 d. s., 
join to p. of one of the rings previously made, 6 
d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. ; draw. 

Second ring. — 7 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 5 p. with 1 d. s. 
between each, 4 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s. ; draw. 

Third ring. — 5 d. s., join to p. of 1st ring, 3 d. s., 
5 p., with 1 d. s. between, 3 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s.; draw. 

Fourth ring. — 7 d. s., join to last p. of 2nd ring, 4d. 
s., 5 p., with 1 d. s. between, 4 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., draw. 

Fifth ring. — 6 d. s., join to last p. of 3rd ring, 
repeat from last *. 

For the leaves, begin in the center. 

First ring.— 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 
5 d. s.; draw. With double thread work 5 d. s., 1 
p., 4 d. s., join to 1st p. of ring, 1 d. s., 4 p. with 4 
d. s. between, 1 d. s., join to middle p. of ring, 4 
d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join to last p. of ring, 

2 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. Going back to the single thread, 
4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw 
and join to 1st p. worked with double thread. 

Second ring. — 5 d. s., join to last p. of last ring, 3 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 5 
d. s.; draw and join to 2nd p. of double thread. 

Third ring. — 6 d. s., join to last p. of 2nd ring, 

3 d. s., 3 p. with 2 d. s. between, 3 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 
draw and join to 3rd p. of double thread. 

Fourth ring. — 7 d. s., join to last p. of 3rd ring, 

4 d. s., 5 p. with 1 d. s. between, 4 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., 
draw and join to 4th p. of double thread. 



Fifth ring. — 8 d. s., join to last p. of 4th ring, 4 
d. s., 7 p. with 1 d. s. between, 4 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. s.; 
draw and join to 5th p. of double thread. The 6th 
ring is like the 4th, the 7th like the 3rd, the 8th like 
the 2nd and the 9th like the 1st. After last ring 
draw your thread over the double thread so as to 
hold it, and with double thread make 3 d. s., join to 
1st p. of 1st ring, 3 d. s., join to last p. of last ring, 
4 d. s., join to 2nd p. of 1st ring; continue working 
around the rings with double thread, making 1 p. to 
every 4 d. s., and joining to the p. of the rings 
wherever necessary to hold in place. Four of these 
leaves are required; join together and to the center 
star, as shown in the illustration. 

The ovals are made as follows: 3 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s.; draw and 





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No. 27. — Center-Piece of Tatted Baby-Cap. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



.-.1 



pass thread through the last p.; make 4 d. s., 1 p., 
4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. S.; draw and tie. 
With the double thread work an oval consisting of 
2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., etc., around the 2 rings; tie and 
cut. Surround this with a row of 14 large and 
small rings worked as follows: 7 d. s., 1 p.; * 4 d. 
s., 5 p. with 1 d. s. between, 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 5 p. 
with 1 d. s. between, 4 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s.; draw. 

First small ring. — Begin as close as possi- 
ble to the large one: 7 d. s., draw through 
the thread back of the large ring, 7 d. 
s., fasten to oval, 7 d. s. ; draw. 

Second large ring. — 7 d. s., join to 
last p. of 1 st ring; repeat from *. 

The larger spaces are filled 
with quafrefoils and tre 
foils, and the smaller ones 
with strands of the 
double thread. 
Around the edge 
is placed a row 
of lace braid 
to preserve 
the out- 
lin e. 



Corner of Tatted Handkerchief. 

No. 28. — This engraving shows the corner of a 
fine handkerchief with a deep border made of 
tatting and a tiny center formed of fine linen lawn. 
A close inspection of the engraving will show how 
the wheels are made and tied together after the 
manner illustrated and described in previous 
pages of this pamphlet. The center ring 
of each rosette is made of double stitches 
separated by long p. To these p. the 
next row of the rosette is attached, 
and the row is formed of ordinary 
rings, each made with 3 very 
long p. In the outer row of 
rings each is made with 7 
long p., and the row is tied 
to the p. of the 2nd 
row. The rosettes 
are tied as seen in 
the picture and 
are also joined 
by four- 
leaved or- 
naments 
tied 




Side 
pieces 
consisting 
of the center 
star with two 
of the leaves, are 
finished in the same 
manner as the large 
piece, as may be seen 
by referring to the illus- 
tration. 

In making a cap of this de- 
scription finethread, either linen 
or cotton, as preferred or con- 
venient to obtain, may be used ; or, 
white crochet silk may be chosen with 
a very rich result. 

Sometimes such a cap is lined with China 
or Surah silk, either in white, or pale-pink or 
pale-blue, as preferred by the maker or the 
mother of the little one who is to wear the cap. 
For Winter wear the lining could be wadded ; 
and in any event the lining could be made ad- 
justable and used or not according to the con- 
dition of the atmosphere or the requirements of 
the season or occasion. For Summer wear it proves 
a very dainty article when worn, unlined, over the 
glossy locks of the little queen of the household. 



in as 
repre- 
sented. 
Single p. 
rings tied to- 
gether form the 
heading of the bor- 
der and cover the join- 
ing of the centers. 
Wheels of any description 
may be used for such a bor- 
der and may be joined as made, 
by quite long or moderately long 
picots. Long picots always produce 
the most delicate effects, especially at 
the edge of the work. 
Among the materials used for the centers 
of handkerchiefs is India grass linen — a fine 
sheer material with a silky texture that is very dainty 
in effect. In linen stores this material may be pur- 
chased by the yard in two widths, either of which 
will make from two to four centers, as a center is 
never over a quarter of a yard square — usually less. 
At some lace-making establishments squares of the 
right size are sold separately, and a lady need not, 
therefore, buy more than she needs. 



52 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Point of Tatting for Ladies' Tie. 

No. 29. — Work the rosettes as follows : 
Work a ring of 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., and 1 p., un- 
til you have up. with 3 d. s. between; close the 




No. 29. — Point of Tatting for Ladies' Tie. 



* Leave a short space of thread, 
to the 1st p., make 3 d. s. and 



stitches in a ring, 
make 3 d. s., join 

close. Leave a short space of thread, make 
s., 1 p., 2 d. s., and 1 p. until you have n p.; 
close. Repeat from * until all the p. around the 
center ring are filled. Baste the rosettes thus 
formed on paper, and fill in the spaces with spider- 
web work as seen in the picture. 

Scolloped Edging. 

No. 30. — This is a pretty narrow edging worked 
with No. 10 crochet cotton, and two threads are used. 
Make a loop with the shuttle thread, work 6 d. s., 1 
p., 12 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., draw up; * reverse the work, 
take the second thread, make a loop, and do 6 d. s., 
1 p. 6 d. s.; reverse, make a loop with the shuttle 
thread, work 6 d. s., join to the thread at the bottom 
of the large oval, where the second thread is begun, 
5 d. s., and draw up; make another loop with the 
shuttle thread, work 6 d. s., join to the last p. in the 
last large oval, 12 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., draw up; repeat 
from * for the length required. 

Crochet along the top for the heading, 1 d. c, 
in a p., 4 chain, and repeat. 

Chantilly Border. 

No. 31. — This border is useful for many pur- 
poses, and is made with two threads of crochet cot- 
ton No. 14 or No. 12. Make a loop with the shuttle 
thread, and work 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 
draw up; * reverse the work, and with the second 
thread work 3 d. s.; reverse, make a loop with the 



shuttle thread, do 2 d. s., 1 p., and 2 d. s. alternately 
ten times, draw up; reverse, resume the second 
thread, and work 2 d. s., 1 p. and 2 d. s., three 
times ; reverse, make a- loop with the shuttle thread, 
do 3 d. s. join to the last but one p. of the large 
oval, 3 more d. s., and draw up; 
reverse, resume the second thread, 
and work 2 d. s., 1 p. and 2 d. s. 
alternately three times; reverse, make 
a loop with the shuttle thread, do 3 
d. s., join to the next p. of the large 
oval, 3 more d. s., draw up; reverse, 
resume the second thread, work 2 d. 
s., 1 p. and 2 d. s. alternately three 
times; join to the next p. but one 
of the large oval ; and still with the 
second thread, do 3 d. s.; reverse, 
make a loop with the shuttle thread, 
work 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 
and draw up; repeat from *. 

For the Heading. — Work 1 d. c. in 
the first p. of the little round eyelet, 
1 ch., 1 d. c. in the next p., 3 ch., 1 
d. c. in the center p. of the large 
oval, 3 ch., and continue. 

Tie-End in Tatting, with 

Detail. 

Nos. 32 and 33. — Use 2 threads 

and begin at center of small scollop. 

Make a ring of 2 d. s., 1 p., and so on 

until you have 12 d. s. Draw up, and 

the center of side scollop is formed. With 2 threads 

make 8 d. s. separated by 1 p. ; make a ring of 7 d. 

s., join to 1st p. in center ring. Repeat this until 

you have joined a ring to each center p.; ch. 8 d. s. 

separated by 3 p., and join to center, thus com- 




No. 30.— Scolloped Edging. 




No. 31. — Chantii.lt Border. 

pleting side-scollop. Make a ch. of 12 d. s. separ- 
ated by 5 p. This brings us to the 4 solid rings in 
top of center. Make a ring of 12 d. s. separated 
by 1 p., 12 d. s., draw up; make another ring the 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



53 



same. Make a ch. of 20 d. s. separated by 9 p.; 

then make a ring of 12 d. s. separated by 5 p.; 

draw up. Ch. 8 d. s. separated by 3 p., and 

make a ring of 7 d. s., join to 1st p. in center 

ring; 7 d. s., and draw up. Repeat this until you 

have joined a ring to each p. in center, 

separated by a ch. of 8 d. s. separated 

by 3 p., and close by fastening at base of 

center ring. Turn the work and return. 

Ch. 12 d. s. separated by 5 p.; make a 

ring of 7 d. s., join to second p. of last 

ch. ; 7 d. s., draw up. Repeat this until 

you have joined a ring to center p. in 

each ch. After making last ring, ch. 12 

d. s. separated by 5 p. and join at base 

of center ring. This closes the center 

scollop; ch. 20 d. s. separated by 9 p. 

Make a ring of 12 d. s., join to p. in top 

of opposite solid ring; 12 d. s.; draw up. 

Make another ring the same, joining to 

remaining solid ring, and the center 

of scollop is completed. Ch. 12 d. s. 

separated by 5 p.; make 12 d. s. 

separated by 5 p., draw up. This 

is center of side-scollop. Ch. 8 d. s. 

separated by 3 p.; make a ring of 7 d 

s., join to 1st- p. in center-ring; 7 d. s., 

draw up. Ch. 2 d. s., join to last p. in 

next to last ch. of center scollop ch.; 

2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. Make another ring 

of 7 d. s., joining to 2nd p. in center ring; 7 d. s. 

and draw up. Ch. as before until you have joined 

a ring to each center p. and close with a ch. There 

will now be completed the whole figure or scollop, 

which is joined to the next by a ch. of 22 d. s. 

separated by 15 p., which brings us to center of 

next side-scollop. 

Tatted Edging. 

No. 34. — Use two threads and make a ch. thus: 
5 d. s., 1 p., * 2 d. s., a p., and repeat 4 times more 
from *, 2 d. s. ; with 1 thread make a ring of 3 d. 



ond to close the figure, (see picture.) * * Next 
use two threads and make a ch. of 4 d. s., 5 p. each 
separated by 2 d. s., then 4 d. s. Now make a ring 
with one thread of 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., join to 2nd 
p. in ch. of figure, 2 d. s., then 6 p. each separated 





No. 32. — Detail of Figure in Tie-End of Tatting. 

s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s. draw up. 
Next with two threads make a ch. to correspond 
with the first one made, then a ring like one just 
described and tie the first two threads to the sec- 



No. 33.— Tie-End in Tatting. 

(For Description of Nop. 32 and 33 Bee Pages 52 and 53.) 

by 2 d. s., 4 d. s. and close. With one thread make 
a ch. of 4 d. s., 4 p. each separated by 2 d. s., then 
4 d. s. Next make another figure like the first one 
but make the tiny ring before making the first ch., 
then after making the 2nd ch., fasten together, 
and also join the first ch. to the ring (see picture), 
then repeat from * *. 

Round Loop Edging. 

No. 55- — Use crochet cotton of a medium size. 
Make a loop with 
the shuttlethread, 
work 12 d. s., 1 p., 
3 d. s., and draw 
up ; reverse the 
work, take a sec- 
ond thread, and 
looping it round 
the fingers, make 
7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. 
s., join to the p. 
of the round ring; 
reverse the work, 
make a loop 
with the shuttle 
thread, work 12 
d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 
draw up; reverse, 
make a loop 
with the second 
thread, do 7 d. s. 
of the round ring, 




No. 34.— Tatted Edging. 




No. 35 — Round Loop Edging. 



, 1 p., 7 d. s., join to the picot 
and continue. 
A crochet heading is worked along the top of the 
edging as follows: 1 d. c. in the p. of the scolloped 
bar, 3 ch., 1 d. c. in the next p., and repeat. 



54 



TATTING AND NETTING, 



Bottom for a Fancy Bag. 

Nos, 36 and 37. — The tatting here illustrated is 
made of orange-colored crochet silk, and may be 
laid over a black silk or satin bag, with a very 
effective result. 

Begin at the center of the section, making a circle 
composed of 9 rings, each ring made as follows: 




No. 36. 

Noa. 36 and 37. — Bottom for a Fancy Bao. 

2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. Draw 
the ring together and fasten it with a knot. The 
rings are joined together, as made, by their first 
side-picots. Having made the 9 rings as directed, 
tie the ends together to form the circle; also join- 
ing the side p. by the working thread, by drawing 
it through them and knotting it. Next make an- 
other circle of 18 rings as follows: 

First ring. — 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 

3 d. s. Draw and fasten with a knot. 

Second ring. — Same as first, joining it to the latter 
at the first side p. 

Now, before making the 3rd ring, draw the work- 
ing thread through the top p. of the ring underneath 
(in the first circle) the same as you would at the 
side p. and knot it, leaving a slack of about three- 
sixteenths of an inch, so that the work will not 
draw or pucker. Leave the same amount between 
the knot and the 3rd ring you are now about to 
make. The engraving shows clearly how the 2nd 
circle is joined to the 1st. 

Now make the 3rd and 4th rings the same as 
the 1 st and 2nd, and then catch the thread to 
the 1st circle the same as before, and so on around 
the entire circle, closing the latter and the adjoin- 
ing p. as before. Now begin the next circle work- 
ing as follows: 

Bring the thread up for three-sixteenths of an 
inch and make a ring the same as the last ones 
made, except that you join its middle p. to that of 
the last ring in the circle underneath. Knot it and 
then turn the work as in making insertion, and, 
allowing about one-fourth of an inch of the working 
thread, make a 2nd ring, also knotting it when 
drawn; then turn the work again and make a 3rd 



ring, joining it to the 1st one of its own circle by 
the side p.; turn, make another ring and join it to 
the second ring of this circle by the side p.; turn, 
make another ring, and join it to the next ring in 
the 2nd circle (see engraving) by the middle p., and 
also at the side p., as before. Work in this manner 
entirely around the circle. Close the circle as 
before, and carry the thread up for the next circle. 
The latter is made on the same 
principal as the one first finished, 
but is arranged as follows: The 
inner row of rings is made the 
same as the last row. The outer 
row is made with 4 d. s. between 
the p. instead of 3. The alternate 
rings of the inner row are joined 
to the successive rings of the row 
underneath by the middle p., and 
the intervening rings are caught, 
by their middle p., to the joined 
side picots of the row underneath, 
the working thread being carried 
along at the back of the work. 
The slack of thread allowed be- 
tween the rings of this circle is 
about three-eighths of an inch. 

To make the Section around the 
Circles. — Carry the thread up and 
make 7 rings of 16 d. s. each, with 3 
p. (4 d. s. between each), joining them by the side p. 
When making the 1st of the 7, catch the rst side 
p. made to the middle p. of the ring of the last 
circle underneath. 

Make the large or end ring as follows: 3 d. s,; 
join to side p. of last ring made; then 1 d. s., 10 
quite long p., and then another d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s. 




No. 37. 



Now make the next ring (on the row coming 
back) the same as the one opposite, joining it to the 
large ring by the side p. Then knot the working 
thread into the thread between the rings of the 
opposite row (see engraving) and then make 6 other 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



55 



rings in a similar manner to correspond with those 
of the first row, knotting the working thread into 
the thread carried up for the first ring, and with it 
also joining the side p. of the last ring made to the 
middle p. of the ring underneath. Now carry the 
thread along towards the left and fasten it to the 
middle p. of the next ring. Then begin the first 
ring of the next double row as follows: 4 d. s., and 
fasten to the thread between the rings underneath; 
7 d. s , fasten to the middle p. of the ring opposite 
in the first double row; 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s. ; draw 
the ring together. Make 6 more rings in a similar 
manner, the same as in the first row of the other 
double row; now make the large end-ring and work 
back as before. Work similar double rows all round 
the work, and join the last row to the first by the p. 
and the working thread. This tatting should be made 
exactly according to the instructions just given. 

Tatted Wheel. 
(Five-Point, Two-Thread Pattern). 

No. 38. — Begin by making 5 large loops for the 
center as follows: 2 d. s., 1 p., and repeat 9 times 
more; 2 d. s., draw up and fasten. Make 4 other 
loops in the same way carrying the thread along 
between each. Join each loop to the one before 
it by drawing the thread through the last p. at the 
place in the pattern calling for 1st p., and mak- 
ing of the thread thus drawn through a long p. 
Fasten the 5th loop to the 1st, bring up the thread 
and proceed with 2 rounds of small loops as 
follows: * 5 d. s., join to 3rd p. of 1st large loop, 
5 d. s., draw up and fasten. Turn. Work 5 d. s., 
1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up, turn 
the work and repeat from * 4 limes more, finishing 



this loop and 1st p. of next loop, 3 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. 
s., join to 2nd p. of loop, 1 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join 
to 3rd p. and 1st of next loop, 4 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 
join to 2nd p. of loop, 1 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., join to 
last p. and 1st of next loop, 3 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., join 
to 2nd p. of loop, 1 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join to last 





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is n Y a. 




WW 



No. 39. — Handkerchief Corner is Tatting. 



p. and 1st of next loop, 3 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., join to 
2nd p. of loop, 1 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join ; repeat 
from * 4 times more. 



c, 

L* -5 












v~* 






Ct*$i*& 



So. 38. — Tatted Wheel (Five-Point, Two Thread Pattern.) 

with small loop, made like the 1st, but fastened to 
the 8th p. of the large loop. This finishes the 1st 
large loop, or point ; make the other 4 in the same 
way. For the last round, join 2 threads to 1st p. of 
outside loop, * 3 d. s., 1 p*., 1 d. s. and join to 2nd 
p. of the loop, 1 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join to 3rd p. of 



Handkerchief Corner in Tatting. 

No. 39. — This border is handsome for handker- 
chiefs, toilet-cushion covers or any article to be 
trimmed at a corner, and may be worked with coarse 
or fine cotton, linen or silk, according to the pur- 
pose for which it is intended. The design consists 
of four-leaved figures, which are joined to each 
other by means of long picots, and is worked with 
1 thread only. 

For each ring of the 1st figure work 6 d. s., 1 p., 
3 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., draw the stitches together; close 
to this work 3 more similar rings, tie the ends of the 
thread together and cut them off. Each p. should 
be about one-fourth of an inch in length. All the 
figures are worked alike. In the following figures, 
instead of forming one or the other of the picots, 
join to the figures previously worked, as shown by 
the illustration. 

Besides trimming the outer edge of a handker- 
chief with this border, it is pretty used as an inser- 
tion between the hem and center of the handker- 
chief, and if used for this purpose, should be worked 
with fine linen thread. The border can be made 
wide or narrow, as preferred, by working more or 
less rows of the four-leaved figures, joining them as 
they are made. 



56 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



DoilgYs, squares and TiDies. 



Tatted Wheel to be Used as a Doily or Mat. 

No. i. — This beautiful wheel was taken from a 
large tatted cape made many years ago in a 
European convent. An illustration of this cape 
may be seen on page 48. The cape also in- 
cludes many other wheels, squares, rosettes, etc. 



together by tying the picots to each other and to 
the tiny rings. The center portion of each scol- 
lop, and the middle of the mat is done in rick-rack 
stitch. Each three-ring ornament is made separ- 
ately and joined as seen in the picture. The same 
plan is observed in making the small half-wheels in 
the middle section of the mat. Each is made and 




No. 1. — Tatted Wheel: To be Used as a Doily or Mat. 



Owing to the fineness of the work accurate count- 
ing of the stitches could not be accomplished, and 
we would suggest that only expert workers under- 
take to develop the wheel here illustrated. The 
method of its construction, however, is very simple 
as it is composed almost altogether of rows of plain 
tatting shaped as seen in the picture and fastened 



fastened to the adjoining one by the corresponding 
picots, and is caught to the rows between which 
it is located by other picots, as will be seen by a 
close reference to the engraving. 

This wheel made in silk, with the center left 
out and fringe attached to the edge, would make 
a charming cover for a lamp-shade. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



57 



Tatted Doily 



WITH Linen, Embroidered 

On i kk. 

No. 2. — Only one thread is required for first round. 
Make 9 p. With 2 d. s. be- 
tween each one, then draw 
loop up, pull thread through 
a p. of first loop and make 
5 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 5 p. with 
one double stitch between 
each one, 2 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. 
draw up, slip thread through 
next p. and make 5 d. s., join 
to last p. of preceding loop, 

2 d. s., 5 p. with 1 d. s. be- 
tween, 2 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. 
draw up, continue till you 
have 9 loops, joining the 9th 
to the first p. of the first loop. 
Tie thread, break off, and 
begin another rosette exactly 
like the first, only join the 
4th and 5th loops to the mid- 
dle p. of 2 loops in the first 
rosette. Join the 3rd rosette 
to the 2nd in the same way, 
leaving 2 loops at the top and 

3 at the bottom of the 2nd 
rosette. Make 21 rosettes, 
joining them so as to form 
a circle. 

For the second round 2 
threads are used. Slip thread 
through the middle p. of the 
left upper loop of one of the 
rosettes, make 8 d. s., and 
fasten in middle p. of next 



s. and join in middle of first loop of second rosette, 
and so on till you have gone around. Tie and 
break off thread. 

The third round requires only one thread. Make 



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w — 






fsf^Sg 1 





No. 3.— Tatted Tidy. 




No. 2. — Tatted Doily with Lunar, Embroidebed Center. 

loop, close up, make 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s. and join in 
middle p. of left loop of next rosette, 8 d. s. and 
join in the middle p. of next loop, 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. 



5 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., fasten in a p. of 
round below, 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 
5 d. s. draw up, turn work, make 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., 
draw up, turn work again, make 7 d, s., fasten to 
last p. of first loop, 7 d. s. draw up, then close to 
preceding loop make 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., draw up, 
turn work make 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s. draw up, turn work 
and make 5 d. s., fasten to p. of last loop on lower 
side, 2 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., fasten in p. of row be- 
low as you did first loop, 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 2 
d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up. Continue till the row is 
completed, then take a needle and thread and draw 
up till it lies smoothly; cut out a circle of linen to 
fit, roll the edge and whip on border of tatting. 

Tatted Tidy. 

No. 3. — This showy tidy is easily made, its wheels 
being mainly formed of narrow edging, made with 
an inner row of small rings and an outer row of 
large and small rings. 

The center of each of the 4 small wheels is formed 
of a large ring of alternate doubles and picots — 21 
of the latter. The next round is made of large and 
small rings, the latter being joined by center p. to 
the p. of the center. Then follows a round like the 



58 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



outer edge of the large wheel, with every other one 
of the inner rings joined to the outer rings of the 
last round. 

The large wheels are made on the same plan until 
they reach the third round which is made with 2 
threads — chs. of as many d. c. as necessary being 
joined by middle p. to the outer row of rings in the 
3rd round, and these chs. alternate with rings which 
are joined by middle p. to the small rings of the 
outer round. The short strips are made like 
the outer rows of the wheels, the insertion 
being doubled and joined by the p. of the 
small row of rings. Regarding the num- 
ber of rings in a wheel, make as many 
in each round as will be necessary 
to cause the wheel to be perfect- 
ly flat. The number will vary 
with the texture of the thread 
and the manner in which 
the stitches are made. 

Tatted Doily. 

No. 4. — No. 30 
thread was 
used in mak- 
ing the 
beauti- 



ring like the last; then repeat until there are 12 
rings; fasten these to the center rings with a needle 
and thread, catching to the 4th and 8th p. of the 
rings around the center, and also through a p. of 2 
rings on the strip last made (see picture); carefully 
preserve a right and a wrong side to the work. 

Next round. — Make wheels thus: For the center 

ring make n p. each separated by 1 d. s. ; draw up 

and break the thread. Next make a ring of 4 

d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; leave a short space 

of thread, make another ring like the last, 

and continue until there are 10 rings; 

fasten this strip of rings to the center 

ring (or the one having n picots), 

making a slip knot through each 

ring and each p. of center ring 

and carrying the thread along 

(see picture). Make 12 of 

these wheels and tie to 

each other by 2 p. and 

to the center also by 

2 p. ; be careful to 

tie securely and 

as neatly as 

is possible. 

Next round. 

— Make a 




ful doily 
illustrat- 
ed, but a 
finer thread 
would result 
even more charm- 
ingly. The actual 
size is about ten in- 
ches in diameter. 

Begin at the center and 
make a ring of 5 d. s., a p. 
(quite long), * 1 d. s., a p., and 
repeat from * until there are n 
p.; then 5 d. s., and close. Leave 
about a quarter of an inch of the 
thread, and make another thread like the 
last, except that in making the 1st p., join 
to the last p. made in the last ring; continue 
until there are 6 rings, but in making the 
last one join it to the first ring made, instead of 
making the last p.; also tie the last one to the first, 
leaving the same length of thread as between the 
others. Fill in the center of each ring and the 
center itself with rick-rack stitch. 

Next, make a row of wheels, making each one 
thus : Make 1 d. s., 1 p., and repeat until there are 
9 p.; then 1 d. s. and close the ring; leave about 
a quarter of an inch of thread, and make another 



ring of 
3 d. s., 1 
p., 1 d. s., a 
p., 1 d. s., a p., 
3 d. s., and draw 
up; turn the work 
and make another 
ring like the last, leav- 
ing a short space of thread. 
Work in this way until there 
are 37 rings on one edge, or 
until the strip is long enough to 
go around the center and lie per- 
fectly flatly; now tie this strip to the 
center by 1 p. in each of 2 rings, then 
skip 2 rings in the strip and tie the next 
2 rings to 2 rings in one of the center 
wheels, leaving a ring free at each side of the 
tying in the wheels around the center; then fill 
in these spaces with a small ring made of 5 p., 
each separated by 1 d. s., and tie this ring to the 
2 p. left free in the center wheels, and the 2 rings 
left in the strip. 

To make Large Wheels. — 12 p. each separated by 
1 d. s., then draw up. Make a strip of 12 rings of 3 
d. s., and 3 p. each separated by id. s., then 3 d. 
s. ; fasten these around the center ring, catching 
the p. to each small ring with a slip knot; then 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



59 



carry the thread to the next one, and so on until 
all are tied. 

Last rou /i J. — Make rings of i d. s., a p., and re- 
peat 6 times more; then i d. s., close. Leave about 
a quarter of an inch of thread, then make another 
ring and repeat until there are 12 rings in all; 
tie together leaving the same length of thread be- 
tween, and fasten these rings to the wheel just 
made, the same as the first strip of rings was fas- 
tened to the center. Make 12 more of these 
large wheels and tie to each other through 

1 p. in each of 2 rings; then tie this 
round of wheels to the center, leaving 

2 of the rings free between each 
tying in the double strip (see pic- 
ture), and fill up the space by- 
rings made with 7 p. with 1 d. s. 
between each (see picture). 

Center-Piece, with 
Tatted Border 

No. 5.— First 
row. — Use one 
thread and 
make 12 p. 
with 2 d. 
s. be- 



through middle p. of 1st loop of a rosette, make 
7 d. s. ; then with 1 thread make (close up) 7 d. s., 
1 p., 1 d. s., 1 J)., 1 d. s., 1 ]>., 2 d. s., i p., 5 d. s., 
draw up as closely as possible; make 5 d. s. and join 
in last p. of preceding loop, 2 d. s., 5 p. with 1 d. s. 
between, 2 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up close to the 
loop, make 5 d. s., join in last p. of 2nd loop of 



clover-leaf, 2 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. 



P-, 7 



d. s. ; draw up. With both threads make 7 d. s. 
and fasten in middle p. of 3rd loop of rosette; 
with both threads, as close as possible, make 
7 d. s. ; with one thread make 7 d. s. and 
join in last p. of 1st clover leaf, 1 d. 
p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 5 
d. s., draw up. Continue as in 1st 
clover leaf, then with both 
threads make 7 d. s. and fas- 
ten in middle p. of 1st loop 
of next rosette. Repeat 
all round. 

Third round. — Use 

1 thread. Make 

5 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. 

s., 1 p., 1 d. 

s., 1 p., 1 d. 

s., join in 

middle 




tween 

each; 

draw up 

and then 

make (a little 

distance from this 

loop) 7 d. s., and 

fasten in a p. of 1st 

loop, 7 d. s., draw up; a 

little distance from this loop 

make 5 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 5 

p., with 1 d. s. between, 2 d. s. 

1 p., 5 d. s., draw up; then make 7 

d. s. and join in next p. of 1st loop, 

7 d. s., draw up; make 5 d. s., join in 

last p. of 1st large loop, 2 d. s., 5 p. with 

1 d. s. between, 2 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up. 

Continue until you have 12 large and 12 small 

loops, fastening the 1st to the 12th to form a 

rosette. Tie and break off thread. Begin another 

rosette just as you did the 1st, only join the 4th 

and 5th loops to the middle p. of 2 loops of 1st 

rosette. Join the 3rd rosette to the 2nd, leaving 

3 loops on the upper side, and 4 on the lower. 

Make 26 rosettes and join the 1st and last to form 

a circle. 

Second round. — Use 2 threads. Slip thread 



p. of 

large 

loop of a 

clover leaf 

below, 1 d. s., 1 

p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 2 

d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s.; 

draw up, turn work and 

make 7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s. ; 

draw up, turn work, make 

5 d. s. and join in last p. of 

large loop, 4 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s.; 

draw up, turn work again and make 

7 d. s., 1 p., 7 d. s., draw up; on lower 

side make 5 d. s., and join in p. of small 

loop, 2 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 

join in middle p. of clover-leaf below, 1 d. 

s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s , 1 p., 5 d. s.; draw 

up. When the row is done, with a needle and 

thread draw up work until it lies smoothly, cut a 

circle of linen of the proper size, roll the edge and 

whip on the tatting. 

A pretty floral design in natural colors is em- 
broidered on the center. The design may, however, 
be developed in white wash silk or in white linen 
floss. It is not necessary to embroider the center 
which may be of sheer linen or India lawn. 



60 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Design for Tatted Tidy. 
No. 6. — The engraving of this tidy fully explains 




No. 6. — Design for Tatted Tidy. 

to the average tatting maker the method of mak- 
ing the article. The border consists of 3 rows of 
ordinary insertion, joined as made, and the bands 
or stripes are similarly made. When the wheels 
are completed the bands and border are made, and 
are attached during their construction to the p. of 
the wheels as seen in the picture. 

Whether made of coarse or fine thread, this tidy 
will prove a very pretty article of decoration. 

Tatted Doily. 

No. 7. — This doily is made of No. 60 cotton. 
It is simple, rapidly made and very effective. It 
should be noted that in tatting, the length of the 
p., by adding to the lace-like effect, largely increases 
the beauty of the work. Begin with the 4 half- 
wheels which surround the muslin center. They 
are worked as follows: Middle ring: 2 d. s., 6 p., 
with 2 d. s. between, 5 d. s., draw up and fasten. 
Large ring: 5 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 5 p., (1 d. s. be- 
tween each), 2 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up; tuin the 
work. Then for the small ring: 7 d. s., attach to 
1st p. middle ring, 7 d. s., draw up. Continue till 
you have 7 large rings and 6 small ones, but instead 
of forming the 1st p. of each ring, join to the last 
p. of the preceding ring. 

For the round beyond the 4 half-wheels, use 2 
threads as follows: Work 3 d. s., using 2nd thread; 
join to middle p. of 1st large ring of wheel, 3 d. s., 



still using 2nd thread; make a ring of * 5 d. s., 1 p., 
5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up; using 2nd 
thread, make 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s.; using single 
thread, * repeat between the 
stars for 4 rings, then join 
double thread to center p. 
of 3rd ring of wheel; con- 
tinue rings and chs. around 
the wheel, joining the 3 cen- 
ter chs. to the 3 center rings 
of wheel- 
Four large wheels form 
the corners. To make each, 
begin in center and work 1 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p.; con- 
tinue till 13 p. are made, 
then draw the ring. The 
outer portion of these wheels 
consists of 13 large and 
small rings made like those 
of the half-wheels. 

The spaces between the 
large wheels are filled in 
with smaller wheels which 
consist of a central ring of 
9 p. with 2 d. s. between, 
and a circle of large wheels 
made like those around the 
large wheels, but having the 
thread at the conclusion of 
each drawn through one of 
the p. of the central ring. 
The doily is then completed 
by an edge worked with * 2 
threads of 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s.; fasten in central p. 
of wheel; 5 d. s., 5 p., with 1 d. s. between, 5 d. s., 







1111 


^pfey ( 


**3§g>4" m§& 




itil 




1 


w^v^^'^^?^iySSp-v 1 56. 

mmMm- 




^^|g#8^ | 



No. 7.— Tatted Doily. 



fasten again in middle p. *. Repeat between the 
stars. Continue to work in this way round the doily. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



01 



Tatted Don. v. 

No. 8. — This doily is of a pretty size for finger- 
bowls, and may be worked 
with linen, cotton or silk. 

Begin in the center, and 
with one thread only, work 
a small circle of i d. s., * i 
p., 2 d. s., repeat from * 
until you have 8 p.; then 
make i d. s. ; draw the stitch- 
es together to form a ring, 
tie the ends and cut off 
the thread. Now use two 
threads; * with i thread 
work a ring of 6 d. s., join 
to a p. of the small circle 
just worked, 6 d. s., draw- 
together, turn the work, and 
with both threads work a 
chain of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s.; 
turn the work back again, 
and repeat from * all round. 
This completes the small 
center rosette. Around this 
rosette, work a round of 8 
three-leaved figures as fol- 
lows: With one thread only, 
make 4 d. s., 5 p., each sep- 
arated by 2 d. s., then 4 d. 
s. ; close the stitches; 2 more 
similar rings are worked close 
to this, then the ends are tied 
and the thread cut off, but 
in working these three-leaved 
figures, the 3rd or middle p. 
of one of the leaves is joined 
to a p. of the center rosette; 



surrounded by a round of chains worked with 2 
threads, as follows: Join to the 4th p. of one of the 
rings of the three-leaved figures (see picture), and 




No. 9. — Tatted Square. 
(For Description Bee Page 62.) 




No. 8.— Tattkd Don. v. 



the three-leaved figures are not joined to each other, 
but to the center rosette only. These figures are 



then, * with both threads, make 2 d. s., 5 p., each 
separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s.; fasten thread in 
2nd p. of opposite ring of same three-leaved figure; 
2 d. s., 5 p., each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s.; 
fasten thread in 4th p. of nearest ring of next three- 
leaved figure, and repeat from * all round. The 
next round is worked alternately with 1 and 2 
threads. * With 1 thread, work 5 d, s., join in 1st 
p. of a chain of last round, 5 d. s., draw up, turn 
the work, and with both threads make a chain of 5 
d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s. ; turn the work again, and with one 
thread make a ring as before, joining the 3rd p. of 
same chain of previous row as before; turn the work 
and make another chain; turn the work, and with 
1 thread make a ring, again joining to last p. of 
same chain as before; turn, and with both threads 
make a chain; turn, and repeat from * all round. 
There should be 3 rings on every chain of previous 
round. The next round is worked alternately with 
1 and 2 threads. * With 1 thread, work a ring 
of 6 d. s., join to a p. of the previous round, 6 d. s., 
draw up, turn the work, and with both threads 
make a chain of 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s. ; turn, and re- 
peat from * all round. Finish with a round as fol- 



62 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



lows: * With i thread make a ring of 7 d. s., join 
to a p. of previous round, 7 d. s., draw up, turn the 
work, and with both threads work a chain of 2 d. 
s., 5 p., each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s., turn, 
and repeat from * all round. Tie the threads 
closely and neatly together at the end of each 
' round, and cut them off. After completing the 
doily, pull it out so as to make it lie flatly; then 
lay a damp cloth on the wrong side and press with 
a warm iron. 

Tatted Square. 

(For Illustration see Page 61.) 

No. 9. — The square here illustrated was also 
taken from the elaborate piece of tatting shown on 
page 48. It will not need special directions, as a 
close inspection 
of the engraving 
will perfectly dis- 
close the method 
of making. It is 
nearly all tied 
together. Rings 
and rows of rings, 
all with many 
long p., are first 
made and then 
formed into the 
design seen. The 
center is one 
large ring with 
long p., and it is 
fastened to a cir- 
cle of tiny rings 
with long center 
p. A similar row 
of tiny rings is 
next the inner 
square of larger 
rings, and is tied 
to it, and then 
the space be- 
tween the two 
rows of tiny rings 
is filled in with 
rick-rack stitches. 
The effect is very 
dainty. The 
wheels or rosettes are made separately and then 
tied in as seen in the picture. The finer the thread 
selected, the more delicate the effect. 

Tatted Circle. 

No. 10. — This is a very pretty circle to be used 
as a doily when made of fine linen or cotton thread; 
or, for parts of a tidy when made of coarser cotton or 
silk. The engraving is of full size. Work as follows: 

Begin in the center with i thread only, and work 
a ring of i d. s., and 8 p., each separated by 3 d. s., 
and finally 2 d. s.; join the thread to the 1st p. of 
the ring just worked after it is drawn together, and 
work * 4 d. s., 7 p., each separated by 2 d. s., finally 
4 d. s. ; draw the stitches together, and fasten the 
thread to the next p. of the middle ring and repeat 




No. 10. — Tatted Circle. 



from * all round; but in working each succeeding 
ring, instead of forming the 1st p., join to the last 
p. of the preceding ring. After completing the 
round, join the last ring to the 1st ring and fasten 
the thread to the 1st p. of the middle ring. Now 
follows a row of four-leaved figures. Work each of 
these figures as follows: 1 ring of 3 d. s., 5 p., each 
separated by 2 d. s., then 3 d. s.; draw the stitches 
together. Close to this ring work 3 similar rings, 
but join one of these rings by the middle p. to the 
middle p. of one of the rings of the small rosette; 
in working each four-leaved figure join to a ring of 
the rosette and to the figure previously worked. 
Work the next round with 2 threads as follows: 
fasten the threads to a middle p. of four-leaved fig- 
ure, and work over the foundation thread, 1 d. s., 9 

p., each separated 
by 2 d. s., then 1 
d. s.; join to the 
middle p. of the 
upper ring of the 
next four-leaved 
figure, and repeat 
all round. 

Work the fol- 
lowing round 
with 2 threads 
also; join to the 
middle p. of the 
four-leaved fig- 
ure (the one that 
the previous 
round was joined 
to), and work, * 
after one-tenth 
of an inch in- 
terval, with one 
thread only, a 
three-leaved fig- 
ure as follows: 
1st a ring of 6 d. 
s. ; then 5 d. s., 
each separated 
by 2 d. s., then 5 
more d. s.; close 
to this make 2 
similar rings. 
After completing 
the 3rd ring fasten to the 1st ring where it is closed, 
and, after one-tenth of an inch interval, fasten to 
the same p. of the four-leaved figure. Now with 
both threads work 8 d. s.; join to the last p. of the 
last ring of the three-leaved figure; now 7 d. s., join 
to the middle p. of the scollop of the preceding 
round, and work, after one-tenth of an inch interval, 
with one thread only, a three-leaved figure as before, 
which must be joined to the last ring by the middle 
p. of the three-leaved figure first worked. After 
one-tenth of an inch interval fasten to the same p. 
of the scollop as before. Now with both threads 
work 7 d. s., join to the three-leaved figure, 8 d. s., 
join to the middle p. of the upper ring of the next 
four-leaved figure, and repeat from *. At the end 
of the round join to the 1st p. joined to. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



68 



Tatted Doily. 

No. ii. — Begin by making a ring thus: Make 3 
d. s., then 8 p., each separated by 3 d. s. ; then 
make 8 tiny rings of 5 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., and tie 
each ring when made, in a p. of center ring, and 
join the circle neatly after the last one is made. 

Next round. — Take a 2nd thread and make with 
the 2 threads a chain of 6 d. s., 1 p., tie in a p. of 
tiny ring, and continue for the entire round in the 
same way; then break the thread. 

Next round. — Make groups of 3 rings, each con- 
sisting of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s. ; tie in a p. of chain, then make another group 
and tie in the next p., and so on until there are 8 
groups in all; then fasten to first group neatly, and 
break the thread. 

Now to even 
out the 4 cor- 
ners, make 2 rings 
like those in the 
groups, and tie 
to each of 4 cor- 
ners, tying in the 
p. of middle ring; 
tie before the 1st 
is made and also 
after the last 
one is completed; 
then break the 
thread. 

Next round. — 
Now use 2 threads 
again, and make 
a long strip of 
rings and chains 
thus: For each 
ring make 3 d. s., 
then 5 p., each 
separated by 3 d. 
s., then 3 d. s. ; 
for the chain 
make 6 d. s. 

Make 28 rings, 
and join the last 
one to the first 
one as neatly as 
possible; now tie 

this strip to the center thus: tying between each 
chain, tie to a middle p. in ring of center group, 
skip 1 ring and 2 chains, and lie to middle p. in 1st 
of 2 corner rings, skip 2 rings and 3 chains for cor- 
ner, and tie to middle of next ring, and so on for the 
entire round, skipping 1 ring and 2 chains across 
the sides, and 2 rings and 3 chains for each corner. 

Next round. — Use 2 threads and tie in the middle 
p. of 1st ring after the corner; make 1 ring of 3 d. 
s., 1 p., then 4 d. s., each separated by 3 d. s., then 
3 d. s.; then make a chain (with both threads) of 7 
d. s., tie in the middle p. of next ring; then make 
another ring and chain, but join the next ring to 
side p. of first ring, make 4 rings and chains like the 
last; then for each corner make 3 large rings of 4 
d. s., join to last ring made, 4 d. s.; then 4 p., each 



separated by 4 d. s. ; then 4 d. s., and close; be- 
tween each ring make chains of 8 d. s., tying to the 
p. underneath the same as first described; between 
each corner along the sides make 4 rings and chains 
and tie the last one to the 1st as neatly as possible; 
break the thread and begin the next round. 



Next round. — Make a ring of 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 

ring be- 
, 4 d. 




No. 11. — Tatted Doily, 



1 p., 4 d. s,, join to middle p. of 1st small 
yond the corner, 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 a. s. 
and close; join the 2nd thread and make a chain of 
8 d. s., then another ring like the last one, only join 
it to the 1st side-picot of last ring made after mak- 
ing the 4 d. s., instead of making the 1st p., and 
also join to ring underneath; make 4 rings in all 
with the 8 d. s.-chains between, then 2 more like 
the last, but join the last 2 to the side p., of 1st large 

ring, leaving the 
middle p. free. 
For each corner 
make 2 large 
rings thus: make 
4 d. s.,' join to 
side p. of last 
ring made, 2 d. 
s., then 4 p. each 
separated by 2 d. 
s.; 2d. s., join to 
side p. of large 
ring underneath, 
2 d. s., then 5 p. 
each separated 
by 2 d. s., then 4 
d. s. ; make a 
chain of 12 d. s., 
then another ring 
like the last; now 
make 8 more 
rings like the first 
one in this round, 
joining the first 2 
and last 2 to the 
side-picots of 
large ring under- 
neath; then make 
the other corners 
and sides in the 
same way, and 
join the last ring 
to the first ring, after making the last chain and 
tying the upper side-picots together. 

Next round. — Make 4 ring-figures, each ring hav- 
ing 5 d. s., then 3 p. each separated by 5 d. s., then 
5 d. s.; make a strip having 24 groups or figures, 
each joined to the last by the middle p. of one ring, 
as made. Join this to the center by tying a p. of 
one ring over the corner chain, then a ring to the 
first chain at each side, then to every other chain 
until the next corner is reached, and so on around 
the square. 

Next round. — Make one ring like those in the last 
round, tie in 1st figure from the corner; then join 
the 2nd thread and make a chain of 14 d. s. (but 
if the work does not seem inclined to lie flatly, 
make 15 d. s.), tie in center p. of top ring in the 



64 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



group; then another ring like last and tie in same 
p.; then repeat the chains and rings until the cor- 
ner is reached (see picture), or until there are 5 
rings and 4 chains; then make 15 d. s. (if 14 were 
used before), and for the corner after the last chain, 
turn the work and make 1 ring, catching the middle 
p. in middle p. of top corner ring, turn the work 
again, make another ring, then a chain of 8 d. s.; 
turn again, make one more ring and catch in the 
same top-picot at corner; turn again, make 1 ring, 
then 15 d. s., and repeat for all the sides and 
corners. 

Next round. — Tie the two threads in the 1st cor- 



group by the middle p. of a ring, to one ring or 
chain in last group (see picture). Make 28 groups, 
then tie to the center, allowing 6 groups to each 
side, and tying them over the chains underneath, 
with 2 rings between each tying along the sides, 
and only one ring at the corner, tying a ring at 
each corner to the center ring at the corner. 



No 
use 
like 



Tatted Square for Tidy. 

No. 12. — Barbour's linen thread, No. 70, was 
:d for making the square shown. Four squares 
2 it are required in making the tidy, and they 




No. 12. — Tatted Square for Tidt. 



ner-ring, then make a chain of 7 d. s., turn, and 
make a ring like those in the last round, letting it 
fall down; make a chain of 7 d. s., fasten to the 
middle p. of ring underneath, and repeat from be- 
ginning until the last ring before the two corner 
ones is reached; then make 8 d. s. for a chain, 1 
ring, 8 d. s., tie to 1st of 2 corner-rings, 6 d. s., 1 
ring, 6 d. s., tie to next ring, then 8 d. s., 1 ring, 8 
d. s., tie to next ring and repeat for all the sides 
and corners. 

Last round. — Make a strip of 4 ringed figures 
thus: 

For each ring make 3 d. s., then 7 p. each separ- 
ated by 3 d. s., then 3 d. s. and close; join each 



may be joined by broad ribbon if desired. The 
square consists of rosettes each made thus: Begin 
with one thread and make a ring of * 2 d. s., 1 half- 
stitch, 1 p., and repeat 4 times more from *; then 
2 d. s., 1 half-stitch, and draw up. Now take the 
2 threads and make a chain just like the ring, then 
another ring, but join the second ring to the first 
one where the second p. would come, at its corre- 
sponding p.; work rings and chains until there are 
8 rings and 8 chains, and join the last ring to the 
first to form a circle as illustrated. There are 4 
rosettes in the center joined as seen in the picture, 
then 8 around the center 4, and 4 at each corner 
(see picture). 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



65 



Half of Oblong, Tatted Doily. 
No. 13. — Begin at the center and work with one 



thread a ring, thus: Make 2 d. s., 1 p., " 3 
p., and repeat 6 times more from *; then 
2 d. s., and draw up. Carry the thread 
along and fasten in the last p.; then make 
another ring like the 1st one, except that 
you catch in the 2nd p. of last ring after 
making the 2 d. s., instead of making the 
1st p.; fasten the thread as before and 
make another ring; fasten the thread in 
the loose thread which was carried along 
from each ring to a p., and then make 2 
more rings, fastening them the same as just 
described; this makes 2 rings at each side 
and one at the end. Fasten on the other 
thread, turn and make a chain of 4 d. s., 
1 p., * 2 d. s., 1 p., and repeat 5 times 
more from last *; then 2 d. s., fasten in 
3rd p. of ring; next make another chain of 
7 p. each separated by 2 d. s., beginning 
and ending with 2 d. s. ; catch in the middle 
p. of next ring. Make 4 more chains like 
the last, and fasten the last one between the 
2nd and 3rd d. s. of 1st chain. Turn the 
work, and still using the 2 threads, make a 
chain of 7 p. each separated by 2 d. s., 
also beginning and ending with 2 d. s. 
Now with the shuttle thread make a small 
ring of 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. 



d. s., 1 




No. 13.— Half of Oblong, Tatted Doily. 



s., catch in the 4th p. of chain underneath, 2 
d. s., i p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. ; draw up. Now 
make a chain of 2 d. s., then 9 p. each separated by 
2 d. s., 2 d. s., another ring like the last one, catch- 



ing in the middle p. of chain underneath; then a 
chain of 1 d. s., then 8 p. each separated by 2 d. s., 
2 d. s., another ring like the last, but fasten between 
the 2 chains underneath, in the top of the middle 




No. 14. — Tatted Doily. 
(For Description see Page 66.) 

p. in the group of 5; this brings you to the center 
of the figure. Now work the other half to corre- 
spond with the one just made, fastening the last 
chain in the last p. of last chain underneath. This 
completes one section. For the large wheel at the 
end, make a large ring for the center thus: 1 d. s., 
1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., and repeat until there are 12 p. in 
all, ending with 1 d. s.; draw up the ring, fasten, 
and break the thread. Next, make around this ring 
12 small rings, thus: 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. 
s., 1 p., 2 d. s., draw up and fasten the thread to a 
p. of large ring. Make another small ring like the 
last, except that you fasten to the 1st ring at the 
side p. after making the 1st 2 d. s., instead of mak- 
ing a p.; draw up this ring and fasten in the next 
p. of large ring, and so continue for the entire 
round, fastening the last ring to the 1st one to make 
a complete circle. 

Next round. — Make large wheels with 11 p. each 
separated by 2 d. s., and with 2 d. s. at the begin- 
ning and end of each; join these wheels where the 
2nd p. would come, to the corresponding p. of pre- 
ceding wheel, and also carry the thread along and 
join to the p. of the small wheels; fasten the last 
wheel to the 1st as in the former round, being care- 
ful to keep a right and wrong side to the work. 

Next round. — * Make a large wheel thus: 2 d. 
s., then s p. each separated by 2 d. s., 2 d. s., join 
to middle p. of a large ring, 2 d. s., 5 p. each sep- 
arated by 2 d. s. ; then 2 d. s., draw up; now join 



66 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



the 2nd thread, turn and make a chain of 2 d. s., 9 
p. each separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s. ; join to 
middle p. of next ring in the circle; then make an- 
other chain, like the last, and also a large ring like 
the 1st one in this round, and repeat from * 4 times 
more, tying the last chain neatly to the 1st ring, and 
joining the wheel to the 1st section at the middle 
of the 2 chains between 2 large rings, as shown in 
the picture. 

Next make the double row of rings at each side 
of the 1st section made. For the rings use 1 thread; 
make 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., join to 3rd p. of 2nd chain; 
4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s.; draw up, turn the work, make 
a ring of 4 d. s.. 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s.; turn, make another ring like the 1st, except that 
you join it to the side p. of the 1st ring after mak- 
ing 4 d. s. ; then skip 1 p. in the chain, and join to 
the next one after the 2nd 4 d. s.; turn, make an- 
other ring like the 2nd, joining it to the side p. of 
the 2nd ring; then turn and make another ring, 
joining it at the side but not to the chain; turn, make 
another ring, joining it at the side; then turn again, 
make another ring, which you join to the side p. 
and also to the 1st p. of the next chain; make 5 
more rings 1st at one side and then at the other, 
joining the two next the chain in each alternate p. 
of the chain; then make one more ring like those 
just made, not joining it to the chain. This brings 
you to the 3 large rings at the end of this section; 
turn, make 4 d. s., join to the side p. of the outside 
ring, * 2 d. s., 1 p., and repeat 5 times more from 
*; 2 d. s., draw up. Fasten the thread to the last 
p. of ring just made, and then make another large 
ring like the last one, only where the 4th p. would 
come, join it to the middle p. of the next chain in 
the 2nd section made; now make another ring 
like the last, fastening it to the side p. of the small 
ring in place of making the last p.; draw up and 
tie into position (see picture); also tie the middle 
p. of this ring to the middle p. of next chain, which 
joined the two sections 1st made together. Make 
another section like the one last made for the other 
side of center section. 

Now make 4 wheels, as shown, at each side of the 
center section. Make the center of each with a large 
ring surrounded by small ones like the center of 
large wheel at the end; then around this make a 
small ring of 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 
2 d. s. ; draw up and fasten in a p. of the small 
ring underneath; then make a large ring of 2 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., join to side p. of small ring just 
made; * 2 d. s., 1 p. and repeat 9 times more from 
*; draw up and fasten to p. of next small ring 
underneath, and repeat the small and large rings 
until there are six rings of each, joining the last two 
large rings of two wheels at their middle p., to the 
1st and 3rd rings of the side sections, and also tying 
the last ring made to the 1st one (see picture). 
Join the other two wheels to the 1st two at the 
middle p. of the top ring, and also at the last small 
wheel in the side section, and to the 1st chain next 
the side section. 

For the Outer Edge. — Use two threads. With 
two threads tie in the middle p. of the lower side 



wheel and make a chain of 2 d. s. ; then 7 p. each 
separated by 2 d. s., then 2 d. s.; * now with one 
thread turn the work. Make a ring of 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 
d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 1 d. s., join to middle p. of 
next large wheel; 1 d. s., 3 more p. each separated 
by 1 d. s, then 1 d. s.; draw up turn and make 2 d. 
s.; join to last p. of chain; 1 d. s.; 1 p. and repeat 
5 times more; then 1 d. s.; draw up, and with 2 
threads make another chain of 2 d. s. ; join to last 
p. in ring; 1 d. s., 7 p., each separated by 1 d. s. ; 
then 1 d. s., and repeat from * for all the work. 

Make another half like this and join neatly be- 
fore working the outer edge. 

Tatted Doily. 

(For Illustration see Page 65.) 

No. 14. — The rings and chs. in this doily are 
made in the same way as those described in the 
square for a tidy given on page 64, except that 
the rosettes have 10 rings instead of 8 as in 
the tidy, and the center consists of 8 half-rosettes 
made (square on the same plain as the whole 
rosettes) thus: Make a ring of * 2 d. s., 1 half- 
stitch, 1 p., and repeat 4 times more from *; then 
2 d. s., 1 half-stitch, and draw up. Now take the 
2 threads and make a ch. just like the ring, then 
another ring, but join the 2nd ring to the 1st one 
where the 2nd p. would come, at its corresponding 
p.; work rings and chs. until there are 6 rings and 
5 chs., and join the last ring to the 1st to form a 
circle as illustrated; join the 1st and last rings of 
the 2nd half-rosette, by the 1st 2 p. of the 1st ring 
and the last 2 of the last ring, to 2nd and 3rd p. of 
the 1st and 3rd chs. Then join the 8 whole rosettes 
as seen in the picture. 

Square Medallion. 

(No Illustration.) 

A pretty, small medallion, useful for a variety of 
purposes, is worked with 2 threads. Fill the shuttle, 
and make a loop on the fingers with the shuttle 
thread, 8 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., and draw 
up; make a loop close, 3 d. s., join to the last p. in 
the oval just worked, 2 d, s. and r p. alternately 6 
times, 3 d. s., draw up; make a loop close, 3 d. s., 
join to the last p. in the last oval, 6 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. 
s., and draw up; you now have a corner of 3 ovals 
or leaves resembling a trefoil; reverse the work, 
take the spool thread and make with it a loop round 
the fingers, and make a bar of 10 d. s. ; * reverse 
the work, make a loop with the shuttle thread, 8 d. 
s., join to the last p. in last oval, 6 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 
draw up; make a loop close, 3 d. s., join to the last 
p. in last oval, 2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 6 times, 3 
d. s., draw up; make a loop close, 3 d. s., join to the 
last p. in last oval, 6 d. s., 1 p., 8 d. s., and draw up; 
reverse the work, take the spool thread and make a 
loop, and work a bar of 10 d. s., repeat from *; 
join the last leaf of the 4th trefoil to the first leaf of 
the first trefoil, and when the square is complete, 
cut the cotton, and tie the ends securely in a knot. 
When working successive squares, join by the corner 
p., or the p. next to the corner, to the correspond-, 
ing p. in the squares already worked. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



07 



Tattkd Square. 

No. 15. — Thisengraving illustrates another pretty 
s [tiara of tatting taken from the handsome tatted 
cape before mentioned. 



if preferred, could be underlaid with silk or satin in 
some pretty tint. Or, narrow ribbons could be 
drawn through some of the spaces. On pages 7 
and 22 are given instructions and illustrations of 



Owing to its age, the 
work does not appear as 
perfectly made as that seen 
nowadays, but the expert 
tatting-maker will be able 
to develop the design 
with accuracy, and thus 
determine how very dainty 
the square may become. 
As represented, the rings 
of the work are tied to- 
gether after the fashion 
of its day, but they may 
be joined by the modern 
method, as made, with a 
neater effect and more 
durable results. Made of 
very fine threads, with the 
p. left long in order to 
produce the feathery ef- 
fect which so increases 
the beauty of tatting, the 
square would be a dainty 
addition to the doileys of 
my lady's bureau. 

Tatted Tidy. 

No. 16. — This engrav- 
ing shows the corner of a 
very pretty tidy made of 
tatting. The tidy may be 
of any size desired, and, 




No. 16.— Corker op Tatted Tidy. 




No 15. — Tatted Square. 



tatting (insertion), by which the rows composing 
this tidy could be made. The arrangement of either 
of the designs can with no difficulty be changed to 
suit this design, since the principle is the same in 
both. Owing to the fact that the tidy illustrated 
had undergone the laundry process before it was 
photographed, and had in consequence suffered 
disintegration, the cut shows the imperfection in 
the detachment of one of its rosettes. The latter 
are all to be connected at each side to the in- 
tervening bars as seen in the lower and outer ro- 
settes. The expert will be able to connect all of 
her rosettes, bars and rows as she works; but they 
may be made separately and tied together. 

Made about four inches square and of very fine 
thread, the design develops into the daintiest of 
doileys; but it may be made of coarser thread or cot- 
ton and of any size desired. A set might comprise 
tidies, a center-piece and large and small doiley. 

Tatted Shamrock Doii.y. 

(For Illustration see Page 68.) 

No. 17. — Begin at the center and with one thread 
make a ring of i d. s., i p., 2 d. s., then 11 p. 
each separated by 2 d. s., then 1 d. s., and close. 



68 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Then tie the thread firmly and cut it off neatly. 

Second round. — Still using one thread, make a 

ring of 6 d. s., join to a p. of ist ring, 6 d. s. and 

close; * turn the work and, using 2 threads, make 




No. \1. — Tatted Shamrock Doily. 

(For Description see Pages 67 and 68.) 

a chain of 5 d. s. ; then with 1 thread make a 
ring of 7 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., then 8 p. each separated 
by 2 d. s., then 7 d. s., and close; now use both 
threads and make a chain of 5 d. s. ; 
make a ring with one thread of 6 d. s., join 
to next p. of first ring, 6 d. s. and close, 
and repeat from * until all the p. in the 
first ring are worked into, and there are 12 
large rings with chains and small rings be- 
tween each; but in making the large rings 
join to each other where the first p. would 
come (see picture), and in the last large 
ring join the last p. to the corresponding p. 
of the first ring, and fasten the thread tight- 
ly when the circle is fully completed. 

Third round. — Use one thread and make 
a ring of 6 d. s., join to the 3rd p. of a 
large ring in the previous round, 6 d. s., 
and close. Turn the work and, using 2 
threads, make a chain of 3d. s.; turn and 
make another ring like the last one, but join 
it to the 5th p. of same large ring; turn the 
work and with two threads make a chain of 
7 d. s.; then with the one thread make a 
large ring thus: Make 7 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
then 6 p. each separated by 2 d. s., 7 d. 
s. and close; * close to the last one make 
another ring like the last one, but where 
the ist p. would come join it to the cor- 
responding p. of last ring, and repeat once 
more from *. Now take the 2 threads and 
make a chain of 7 d. s., and repeat from 
the beginning of round; but in making the 



ist large ring in the next shamrock or group of 
3, join the 4th p. to the corresponding p. in the 
last ring of last group, and at the end join the 
last ring in the last shamrock to the ist ring of 
the ist shamrock (see picture). There should be 
12 shamrocks in the circle. Tie the thread and 
fasten off. 

Fourth round. — Use one thread and make a ring 
of 6 d. s., join to the 2nd p. of the middle ring of 
shamrock, 6 d. s. and draw up; use the two threads 
and make a chain of 3 d. s., then with the one 
thread make another ring like the last, but join 
to the 4th p. of middle ring of shamrock; then 
with the 2 threads make a chain of 8 d. s., then 
make a smaller shamrock thus: Make a ring of 5 
d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 6 p. each separated by 2 d. s., 
then 5 d. s. and draw up; make 2 more rings close to 
and like the last one, joining each as made to the 
corresponding p. of last ring after making the ist 
5 d. s. ; then make a chain of 8 d. s. and repeat 
from the beginning of round, except that you join 
the next 2 small rings which are separated by the 
3-chain to 2nd p. of the next ring and the ist p. of 
the next one (see picture), thus joining to every 
ring of shamrock in last round, and join the last 
shamrock to the ist one the same as in the last 
round; there will be 24 shamrocks in this round. 

Fifth round. — Make the same as the last except 
that you only join the 2 small rings to the middle 
ring of each shamrock instead of to every ring 
(see picture). There will be 24 shamrocks in this 
round also. Tie securely, and break the thread. 
Put a cloth that has been dipped in borax water 
and wrung out, over the doily and press nicely. 




No. 18.— Tatted Doily. 
(For Description see Page 69.) 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



69 



Tatted Doii.y. 

(For Illustration see Pa«e S8.) 

No. iS. — Two kinds of tatting are employed in 
making this doily. The rosettes are made with a 
single thread, and the border with two. The cen- 
ter of each ring contains 30 stitches and T2 p., 
with 2 stitches and a half between the p.; finish 
off and tie in a perfect ring. 

Be^in the 2nd row by making a small loop of 8 
stitches and 3 p. (1 p. between 2nd and 3rd stitches, 
1 between 4th and 5th, and 1 between 6th and 7th); 
draw up and make a larger loop of 16 stitches and 
3 p. (r p. after every 4th stitch); draw up and 
make a 2nd 
small loop 
like 1st, attach- 
ing the 1st p. 
to 3rd in xst 
small loop, 
also attaching 
each small 
loop to the ring 
by middle p. 
Continue 
smalland large 
loops until 12 
of each are 
made, when 
the rosette will 
be complete. 
Examine the 
pictureinorder 
to see where 
the 3 rosettes 
are joined. 

The little 
edge or border 
is made with 2 
threads. After 
making a loop 
like larger one 
in the rosette, 
tie on the 2nd 
thread close to 
loop,holdfirm- 
ly between left 
thumb and 
first finger, 
wind the new 
thread around 
3rd finger to 

hold taut, then work d. s. with first thread on the new 
thread. Make 8 stitches, with 1 p. coming between 
the 4th and 5th stitches; then begin another loop as 
before, attaching to the rosettes as seen in picture. 

Toilet Mat of Tatted Medallions. 

No. 19. — For the first Medallion in the first 
round. — Fill the shuttle, but do not cut the cotton off 
from the spool or ball. Work 8 d. s., a large round 
p., 8 more d. s., and draw up close; reverse the work, 
make a loop on the fingers with the spool thread, 2 
d. s., 1 p., and 2 d. s. alternately 5 times; * reverse 



Xo. 19.— Toilet Mat 



the work, make a loop with the shuttle thread, and 
make 8 d. s., join to the large round p., 8 more d. s., 
and draw up; reverse, make a loop with the spool 
thread, work 2 d. s., 1 p., and 2 d. s. alternately 5 
times; repeat from * 4 times more, and join round, 
tying the ends of cotton securely. 

Second round. — This round is worked similarly 
to the first round, with 2 threads, the 2nd thread to 
come direct from the spool; * make a loop with 
the shuttle thread, 8 d. s., join to the 2nd p. in one 
of the straight bars of preceding round, 8 d. s., 
draw up; reverse the work, make a loop with the 
spool thread, work 2 d. s., 1 p., and 2 d. s. alterna- 
tely 5 times; reverse, make a loop with the shuttle 

thread, 8 d. s., 
join to the 4th 
p. in the same 
straight bar 
of preceding 
round, 8 d. s., 
draw up; re- 
verse, make a 
loop with the 
spool thread, 
work 2 d. s., 1 
p., and 2 d. s. 
alternately 5 
times; reverse, 
and repeat 
from * to the 
end of the 
round, making 
i20valsand 12 
straight bar 
scollops in the 
round; join 
firmly, and cut 
off the cotton. 
All the medal- 
lions are work- 
ed in the same 
manner as the 
firstmedallion. 
When you 
have done 10 
Straight bar 
scollops of the 
2nd medallion, 
join the center 

p. of the nth 
or Tatted Medallions. b ar j (h e cen- 

ter p. of a bar 
of the 1st medallion, and join the center p. of the 
X2th bar in the same way. The 3rd medallion must 
be joined to the 1st, and also to the 2nd medallions; 
and so on until 7 medallions are arranged in a 
circle. The tatting, if for a toilet mat, should be 
laid over a foundation of colored twill or wash sateen. 

Tatted Doily or Cushion-Cover. 

(For Illustration eec Page 70.1 

No. 20. — Begin in the Center as follmvs: * 1 d. s., 
a p., repeat from * 8 times more; 1 d. s., draw 
thread up and fasten. 




70 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Around this large ring are 9 small rings, each 
made with 7 d. s., a p., 7 d. s. ; draw up and fasten 





on 


/MC4. jV ^ 




* J pep 

A. J o° 


W 



No. 20. — Tatted Doily or Cushion-Cover 
CFor Description see Pages 69 and 70.) 



s., a p., 2 d. s., fasten in last left-hand p. of out- 
side row, 3 d. s., fasten in next p. of wheel, * 3 
d. s., a p., 2 d. s., a p., 2 d. s., a p., 3 
d. s., fasten in next p.; repeat from * 
3 times more; fasten. With the two 
threads make 5 d. s., turn the work, 
and with the shuttle-thread make 6 
d. s., join to next p. of outside row; 
2 d. s., join to the next p., 5 d. s., 
draw up and fasten; turn the work, 
make 5 d. s., and repeat from * * 8 
times more. 

Tatted Circle. 

No. 21. — The circle here illustrated 
is also a part of the exquisite tatted cape 
made by Irish nuns and shown on 
page 48 of this pamphlet. The thread 
used was quite fine, and the rings in the 
center rows are very tiny, each having 
five long p. which produce a very soft, 
feathery effect. As made, the rows are 
all formed separately and are then tied 
together through the p. and working 
threads. An expert tatting maker, how- 
ever, would be able to connect the rows 
as she works, and would thus increase the 
beauty and finish of the circle, which 
can be used for a variety of purposes. 
It may form the center of a doily or a 
section of a tidy; or, it could be let 
into a square or circular center-piece 
of linen to be bordered with tatting. 



each in turn, to a p. of the large 
ring. To the p. of the 1st small 
ring fasten a 2nd thread, bring up 
the shuttle thread, and fasten at 
the same place. * Using both 
threads, make 7 d. s., then take 
the shuttle thread and make small 
rings as follows: 5 d. s., a p., 5 d. 
s., draw up and fasten. Then with 
the two threads make 7 d. s., and 
fasten to p. of next ring; repeat 
from * 8 times more. This com- 
pletes the 2nd circle from center. 

Next fasten the threads in cen- 
ter p. of 1st ring, and make * 6 d. 
s., a p., 4 d. .s., a p., 4 d. s., a p., 4 
d. s., a p., 6 d. s., fasten in p. of 
next small ring; repeat from * 8 
times more. 

For Outside Wheels.—* * Take 
the shuttle thread and make center 
of wheel as follows: 2 d. s., a p.; 
repeat 5 times more, and draw up 
and fasten on the 2nd thread; 
make 3 d. s. a p., 2 d. s., a p., 2 
d. s., a p., 3 d. s., fasten in the 
next p., 3 d. s. and fasten in 1st 
right-hand p. of outside row, 2 d. 




No. 21.— Tatted Circle. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



71 



Corner or Tatted Square. 

No. 22. — The corner of a very handsome tidy 
or square of tatting is here illustrated. By a close 
inspection of the engraving and a refer- 
ence to the instructions for making the 
tatting illustrated at No. 70, page 29, 
the square may be easily constructed, 
since the rosettes are made on precisely 
the same plan as those in the scollops 
of the lace mentioned, and its straight 
strips are composed of reversed and 
joined rows of tatting like that forming 
the heading to the lace. The work may 
be joined as made, or the rosettes may 
be made separately and joined by tying. 
The first method is most durable. 

Should the edge of the square be 
considered too severe in outline, it may 
very easily be softened by adding a 
dainty edging of half or whole wheels. 

In the first department of this pamph- 
let will be found many designs for wide 
and narrow edgings, any of which might 
be used in its entirety for the purpose 
suggested; or, parts of many of the 
edgings could be selected and used to 
form a very handsome border. Upon 
the ingenuity of the worker would 
depend the success of the addition. 

Tatted Square. 

No. 23. — This illustration, and No. 
25 on page 72, No. 26 on page 73, No. 



29 on page 74, and No. 31 on page 75, are all 
taken from the beautiful cape before alluded to and 
represented on page 48. When properly developed 
in fine thread, with long picots, the effect is most 




No 23.— Tatted Square. 




Xo 22— Corner of Tatted Sqcark. 



lovely. By referring to the illustra- 
tion of the cape the method of ar- 
ranging all of the wheels, circles and 
squares taken from it will be seen. 
The sections named are, however, 
just as suitable to be used separately 
as doileys, mats, etc. 

The old method of tying the parts 
and rows together has been followed 
in the cape and its sections, but 
the modern worker will be able to 
unite most of the rings, wheels, etc., 
as she makes them. Neater and 
more durable work is thus produced. 

Josephine Knots. 

This name is given to small bun- 
ches of stitches that are occasionally 
knotted upon the shuttle thread to 
ornament spaces between ovals and 
bars where a piece of long straight 
cotton would look too light. To work 
a Josephine knot, make a loop in the 
usual manner with the shuttle thread, 
and work 4 single or half stitches, and 
draw up quite closely in a round 
bunch. A larger knot can be made by 
working 6 single stitches instead of 4. 



72 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Doily of Tatting in Silk, for a Cushion. 
No. 24. — Begin in the center and make 5 large 




No. 24. — Doily of Tatting in Silk, foe a Cushion. 



p. of this loop and 1st p. of the next loop, 3 d. 
s., 1 p., 1 d. s., join to the next p., 1 d. s., 1 p., 
3 d. s., join to 3rd p. of this loop and 1st of the 
next, 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., join to the 
next p., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., join 
it to the last p. of this loop and the 
1st of the next. This takes the 4th 
round over the loop of the 3rd round, 
which marks the point. 3 d. s., 1 p., 
1 d. s., join to the next p. of the loop, 
1 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join to the 3rd 
p. of this loop and the 1st of the next, 
3 d. s., 1 p., i d. s., join to next p., 1 
d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join to last p. of 
this loop and 1st of the next. Re- 
peat from * 4 times more. 

Fifth round. — Use 2 threads, which, 
if the work has been correctly done, 
will be fastened half-way between 2 
points, * 6 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 4 
d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., fasten 
in the 1st p. of the point. Use 1 
thread, 3 d. s., catch in the last p. 
of two-thread movement, 2 d. s., 1 
p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 
1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., draw up and 
fasten. Make 2 d. s. with 2 threads, 
then fasten to the next p.; make a 
loop with 1 more p. than the 1st. 
Make 2 d. s. with the 2 threads, 
then fasten to the next p.; make a 
loop the same as the first, except 



loops, as follows: * 3 d. s., then 10 
p. with 2 d. s. between, 3 d. s., draw 
up and fasten. Repeat from * 4 
times more. Join the loops by the 
1st and last p. Bring the thread up 
for the 2nd and 3rd rounds, which 
are made together, as follows: 

* First small loop. — 5 d. s., join to 
3rd p. of the large loop, 5 d. s., draw 
up, fasten and turn the work over. 

First small loop with picots. — 5 d. 
s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. 
s., 1 p., 5 d. s., draw up, and turn the 
work over. 

Second small loop. — 5 d. s., join to 
next p. of large loops, 5 d. s., draw 
up; turn the work. Then, 5 d. s., 1 
p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 5 d. s., 
draw up; turn the work. 5 d. s., join 
to next p., 5 d. s., draw up and turn; 
5 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 
5 d. s., draw up. This loop marks 
the middle of the point. Make 3 
more small loops, and 2 with the 3 
p., the same as the 1st 2 with p.; 
then repeat from last * four times 
more. This gives the pattern 5 points. 

Fourth round. — Use 2 threads; join 
them to the 1st p. of outside loop, * 
3 d. s., 1 p., i d. s., join to 2nd p. of 
loop, 1 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., join to 3rd 



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No. 25 — Tatted Squabe. 
(For Description see Page 71.) 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



73 



tint you make i more p., which takes the place of 
the i st joining to the two-thread movement. Make 
a ch. of 6 d. s., join to the last p. in ring, i p., 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 4 d. s„ i p., 6 d. s.; fasten 
half-way to the next point. Re- 
peat from * 4 times more. 

Finish by working around each 
point a cluster of loops as follows: 
Fasten both threads into the 3rd 
p. of 1st loop after joining; 4 d. 
s., 1 p., 3d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 
d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 
p., 4 d. s., draw up and fasten; 
make a ch. of 3 d. s. ; fasten into 
the 2nd p. of center loop after 
joining; make a 2nd loop the same 
as the 1st; join the 2 at the 1st p. 
of 2nd loop. Ch. 3 d. s., fasten 
into the next p. Make a 3rd loop 
of 4 d. s., fasten to last p. of 2nd 
loop, 3 d. s.. 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. 
s., 1 p , 4 d. s., 1 p., 3 d. s., 1 p., 
3 d. s., 1 p., 4 d. s., draw up; ch. 
3 d. s., fasten into the next p. of 
center loop. Make the 4th and 
5th loops the same as the 1st and 
2nd. Ch. 3 d. s. between each 
loop. Repeat for each point. The 
beauty of this pattern will depend 
upon its being done evenly, and 
having the loops well fastened. 

White silk doileys of this kind 
would be placed over colored cush- 
ions, and colored ones over white. 



Tatted Square. 
No. 27. — The border and cross portions of this 




No. 27. — Tatted Square. 




No. 26.— Tatted SQUARE.— (For Description eee Page 71.) 



square are made of rows of tatting like 
that composing the heading to the edg- 
ing seen at No. 13 on page 8. The 
rows may be joined by their p. as made, 
or they may be tied together through the 
p. The former method is not only the 
more durable but the neater of the two. 
The wheels within the squares are 
each formed of a center ring of p. and 
double stitches, around which is worked 
a circle of large and small rings made 
like those in a number of wheels on other 
pages of this pamphlet. The maker may- 
be obliged to experiment a little in order 
to produce a perfectly flat wheel; and 
she may connect the wheels, as seen in 
the engraving, as she makes them, by 
their p., or they may be tied together 
through the p. after the thirty-six wheels 
necessary are completed. 

Wheel Medallion. 

(For Illustration see Page 74.) 

No. 28. — This is a pretty medallion 
composed entirely of ovals worked with 
the shuttle thread only. 

Forthe firstWheel. — Having the shut- 
tle threaded and filled with cotton, make 



74 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



a loop round the fingers, and work 5 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. 
s. and 1 p. alternately 6 times, 5 d. s., and draw up; 
* make a loop, 5 d. s., join to the last p. of the pre- 
vious oval, 2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 6 times, 5 d. 
s. and draw up; repeat from * till you have 8 ovals 



worked; remember to join the last p. of the 8th 
oval to the 1st p. of the 1st oval; cut the cotton 
and tie the ends firmly together. 

For the second Wheel. — Begin with a loop round 
the fingers, work 5 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 





No. 28. — Wheel Medallion. 
(For Description see Page 73.) 



No. 30.— Octagon Medallion. 
(For Description see Page 75.) 




No. 29. — Tatted Circle with Points. 

(For Description see Page 71.) 



p., 2 d. s., join to the center p. of 
one of the ovals in the first wheel, 
2 d. s. and i p. alternately 3 times, 
5 d. s., draw up; make a loop, 5 d. 
s., join to the last p. of the previous 
oval, 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. 
s., join to the center p. of the next 
oval in the first wheel, 2 d. s. and 
1 p. alternately 3 times, 5 d. s., 
draw up; * make a loop, 5 d. s., 
join to the last p. of the previous 
oval, 2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 6 
times, 5 d. s., draw up; repeat from 
* till 8 ovals are worked, join the 
last p. of the 8th oval to the 
first p. of the first oval; join, and 
secure the ends of cotton. 

The 3rd wheel is worked simi- 
larly to the 2nd wheel; and the 4th 
wheel is to be joined by p. in 4 
ovals to the corresponding 4 ovals 
in the wheels already worked, and 
the 4 wheels together form a per- 
fect square. In making successive 
medallions join the center p. of an 
oval to the center p. of an oval in 
a medallion already worked, or 
they may be crocheted together. 
When sufficient medallions are 
worked, take a sewing needle and 
finer cotton, and fill up the spaces 
in the center of the wheels, and 
the spaces in the center of each 
medallion, with cobweb stitch. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



75 



Octagon Medallion. 

(Ph Illustration tiee Vn£v 74.) 

No. 30. — This medallion is tatted with the shuttle 
thread only. The engraving shows a 
square of four octagons joined to- 
gether. Select cotton suitable for the 
article you intend working. 

For the first Octagon. — Having a 
sufficiency of cotton wound upon the 
shuttle, begin for a large oval — make 
a loop on the fingers, and work 5 d. 
s., 1 ]>., 2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 4 
times, 5 d. s., and draw up; for small 
oval, reverse the work, make a loop 
close, 6 d. s., 1 p., 6 d. s., and draw 
up; reverse the work, for large oval 
make a loop close, 5 d. s., join to the 
last p. in the first large oval, 2 d. s. 
and 1 p. alternately 4 times, 5 d. s., 
and draw up; * for another large oval, 
make a loop, and leaving one-sixth of 
an inch of thread between this oval 
and the last, work 5 d. s., join to the 
last oval ; 2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 
4 times, 5 d. s., and draw up; reverse, 
and for the small oval, make a loop 
close, 6 d. s., join to the p. in the first 
small oval, 6 d. s., draw up; reverse, 
and for a large oval, make a loop close, 
work 5 d. s., join to the last large 
oval, 2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 4 
times, 5 d. s., and draw up; repeat 



from * twice, and in doing the last '(the eighth) 
large oval join the last p. to the first p. of the first 
large oval, and this completes the octagon; join 
round securely, and cut oft the cotton. Make as 




32. — Corner op Tatted Tidt. 




No. 31.— Tatted Sqcare — (For Description see Page 71.) 



many octagons as you require for the 
piece of work, joining each octagon in 
position as you go along. The method 
of joining may clearly be seen in the 
illustration, also the spiders' web which 
fills in the space between 4 octagens, 
and which is worked in afterwards with 
a sewing needle and fine cotton. 



Corner or Tatted Tidy. 

No. 32. — This engraving represents 
a very pretty design for a tatted tidy. 
On pages 7 and 10 may be seen the 
two kinds of insertion composing the 
bands and blocks, and also the outer 
row of the rosettes. The two inner 
rows of the rosettes are simply plain 
tatting made like some of the centers, 
to wheels in other parts of the pamph- 
let. The tidy from which the corner 
was photographed had been laundred, 
and perfectly satisfactory results in 
the way of a picture were not obtain- 
able. The engraving, however, will 
serve its purpose of affording a de- 
sign or an idea to the ambitions maker 
of tatting. 



76 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Tatted Doily. 

No. 33. — First round. — Begin in the center of the 
doily, make a loop on the fingers with the shuttle 
thread, work 1 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 
11 times, 1 d. s., draw the loop up close, cut the 
thread, and tie firmly. This forms the center. 

Second round. — Make a loop, 6 d. s., join 
to a p. of the first round, 6 d. s., draw 
up; reverse the work, make a loop \ of 
an inch away, 4 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s. and 

1 p. alternately 6 times, 4 d. s., draw 
up; * reverse the work, and again 
leaving £ of an inch of cotton, 
make a loop, 6 d. s., join to 
the next p. of the first 
round, 6 d. s., and draw 
up; reverse, make 
loop \ of an inch 
away, 4 d. s., join 
to the last p. of 
the previous 
large oval, 

2 d. s. 



2 d. s., 1 p. and 2 d. s. alternately 5 times; reverse the 
work, and now make another trefoil similar to the 
first, and join the 1st leaf to the 3rd p. of last leaf of 
the previous trefoil (where the straight bar scollop is 
already joined), and join the 2nd leaf to the center p. 
of an oval of last round, and continue, and make 12 
of the trefoils and 12 scolloped bars in the round. 
Fourth round. — Heart-shaped scollops. Make 
a loop with the shuttle thread, 7 d. s., join 
to the center p. of one of the scolloped 
bars of last round, 7 more d. s., and 
draw up; * reverse the work, take a 
2nd thread, make a loop and 4 d. 
s. ; make a loop with the shuttle 
thread, 2 d. s., 1 p. and 2 d. s. 
alternately 9 times, draw up; 
reverse, make a loop with 
the 2nd thread and 2 d. 
1 p. and 2 d. s. al- 
ternately 3 times; 
reverse, make a 
loop with the 
shuttle 
thread, 




and 1 p. 

alternately 
6 times, 4 d. 
s., draw up, and 
repeat from * till 
12 small and 12 large 
ovals are worked in the 
round, and fasten off. 

Third round. — Worked 
with 2 threads in trefoils and 
straight bars thus: Make a loop 
with the shuttle thread, 3 d. s., 1 p., 
2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 4 times, 3 
d. s., draw up; make a loop close by, 4 
d. s., join to the last p. in the oval j ust made, 
2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., 1 p., 2 d. s., join to the 
center p. of an oval of previous round, 2 d. s. 
and 1 p. alternately 3 times, 4 d. s., and draw up; 
make a loop close by, 3 d. s., join to the last p. in 
the oval just made, 2 d. s. and 1 p. alternately 4 
times, 3 d. s., and draw up; reverse the work, take a 
2nd thread and make with it a loop on the fingers, 
and work 2 d. s., 1 p. and 2 d. s. alternately 5 times, 
join to the 3rd p. of the last oval; still with 2nd thread, 



4 d. s., 

join to 

both the 2nd 

and 3rd p. of 

the oval with 9 p., 

4 more d. s., and 

draw up; reverse, make 

a loop with the 2nd 

thread and 2 d. s., 1 p. and 

2 d. s. 5 times; reverse, make 

a loop with the shuttle thread, 

4 d. s., join to both the 2nd and 3rd 

p. of the oval with nine picots (same 

place where joined already), 4 more 

d. s. and draw up; reverse, make a loop 

with the second thread and make 2 d. s., 1 p. 

and 2 d. s. alternately three times, join to the 

middle p. of the oval with nine p., 4 d. s.; reverse, 

then make a loop with the shuttle thread, 7 d. s., 

skip one scolloped bar of previous round and join to 

the center p. of the next scolloped bar, 7 more d. s., 

and draw up; repeat from* to the end of the round, 

cut cotton and fasten securely. In this round 

regulate the 4 d. s.-bars in length to make them flat. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



77 



NETTING. 



Note : — As everv detail necessary to the knot and mesh-Stick used in Netting is described and illustrated in making a 
Hammock, we have thought it best to give the Method of Making a Hammock as Rudimentary Instruction in making Netting. 




Method of Making a Hammock 

ok a Tennis-Net. 

(Rudimentary Details of Netting.) 

The pleasant, not to say luxurious, feeling one 
enjoys while swaying to and fro in a well-made 
hammock swung under the "shady roof" of some 
fnendlv tree, or within some bower where " quiet 
reigns supreme," is one of the strongest arguments 
in favor of this 
unpretentious- 
looking yet most 
delightful me- 
dium of pleasing 
repose. The 
majority of ham- 
mocks purchas- 
ed are very 
weighty, and 
this fault very 
often furnishes 
a reason for not 
carrying them 
with the travel- 
ling parapher- 
nalia when one 
takes the usual 
Summer outing. 
Light, pretty 
ones can, how- 
ever, be made 
at home with 

but slight expense, and we have endeavored to assist 
our patrons in making one of the simplest, light- 
est and prettiest articles of this kind, and at the 
same time teach them the method or art of Net- 
ting; for when the knot and mesh of the hammock 
are mastered, fancy netting of all descriptions be- 
comes a pastime or employment easily accomplished ; 
and it will be as easy to make the beautiful netted 
articles seen on following pages of this pamphlet as 
to produce the hammock. 

How to Make the Hammock. 

No. i. — This engraving illustrates the hammock 
under consideration, which is small in bulk and 
light in weight, although it is of the dimen- 
sions required for use by persons of all sizes and 
weights. The cord employed in making it is of 
the soft cotton variety, this being the best for 
hammocks that are to be carried about from place 



No. 1.— Hammock 



-■Wedge or Mesh-Stick. 




No. 4.— Shuttle, Wound 



to place, as it is very light and at the same time 
very strong. The hammock is very easy to con- 
struct; and by carefully following the succeeding 
directions, any person, either old or young, will in 
a ^ery short time gain a thorough knowledge of 
how to make one like it. 

Wedge or Mesh- Stick for Netting Hammocks. 

No. 2. — This illustrates the wedge or mesh-stick 

to be used in 
f o rming the 
meshes in a 
hammock. The 
wedge may be 
easily made at 
home where 
there are handy 
boys, in case it 
cannot be found 
in a convenient 
shop. Take a 
smooth piece of 
hard wood eight 
or ten inches in 
length, an inch 
and a half in 
width, andabout 
three - quarters 
of an inch in 
thickness; and 
have it beveled 
or planed off to- 
ward one long edge, so that this edge will be 
about an eighth of an inch in thickness, leaving the 
heavier edge of the wedge from three-eighths to 
half an inch in thickness. All sharp angles should 
be smoothly rounded, and then you have your 
wedge or mesh-stick, just as complete and suitable 
as if you had purchased it. 

Mesh-Sticks for Fancy Netting. 

In making fancy netting, round wood, steel or 
ivory mesh-sticks, or flat ones of two widths in 
ivory or wood, such as are seen at Nos. 5, 6 and 7, 
are used, and they may generally be obtained at 
fancy-work shops or wherever fancy-work imple- 
ments are on sale, or they may be made at home — 
the flat ones from hard wood and the round one 
from a bone or wooden knitting needle. Ordinary 
steel knitting needles in the various sizes, as re- 
quired, may be used in place of mesh-sticks. 



No. 3. — Needle or Shuttle, Unwound. 



78 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Needle or Shuttle, Unwound. 

No. 3. — The needle or shuttle required in 
netting hammocks is illustrated at No. 3. It 
is similar to that used by fishermen in making 



"*-£*** 






: --'-!-* 


No. 5. — Round Mesh-Stick. 


( 






) 


No. 6. 


( . ) 



No. 7. 

Nos. 6 and 1.— Flat Mesh-Sticks. 



and may 
wedge can 



generally be purchased wherever 
be procured; or it may be made 



The shuttle should be held loosely and in one 
position while winding, so as not to twist the cord, 
which should be wound on tightly so that it will 
not slip off during the knotting. When the shuttle 
is wound, commence the hammock as follows: 
Tie, hang or otherwise fasten 
a hook on a tree, table, post, 
door or any article staunch 
enough to resist the strength of 
the' worker. 

(In making fancy netting 
some netters use a cushion 
stuffed with sand or any heavy 
material, like that seen at No. 
8; others fasten a strip of cloth 
under the foot and over the 
knee and pin the netting to 
the strap; others fasten a little 
iron rod to a window-sill, with 
a leather strap at each end to 
hold it, and fasten the netting 
to the rod; others fasten it to 
a cord and pin the latter firmly to the knee.) 

Tie the cord selected for the hammock around 



nets, 
the 

at home if a little ingenuity be exercised. Take the wedge in an ordinary knot, making the knot at 

smooth piece of hard wood 

inches long, a 

an inch wide, 

enough to be 

Atone 

form a 



a 

ten or eleven 

little less than 

and only thick 

supple but not to break. 

end cut it out so as to 



deep curve or heel to catch the 
cord, and shape the other end 
off to a long point, thus pro- 
ducing a tongue or olive point. 
About an inch and a quarter 
below the point, cut away the 
wood about an eighth of an inch 
from each side of the center, 
for three or four inches down, 
to form a prong or tooth, about 
which the cord is to be wound. 
The illustration shows the shape 
of the shuttle clearly. A sim- 
pler shuttle, not quite so con- 
venient may be made as fol- 
lows: Take a similar piece of 
wood and cut out each end in 
a deep curve or heel, making 
the curve sufficiently deep to 
retain the cord nicely. Wind 
the cord straight up and down 
about this, and the shuttle is 
ready for work. 

At Nos. 9 and 10 are shown 
two styles of steel needles used 
for making fancy netting. 




No. 8. — Cushion for Holding Netting. 



No. 9. 




Shuttle, Wound. 

No. 4. — The shuttle is shown 
at No. 4, with the cord properly wound upon 
it. In winding the cord on, hold the shuttle in 
the left hand and wind the cord over and under, 
twisting it once about the prong at each turn. 



No. 10. 
Nos. 9 and 10. — Steel Netting Needles Used in Making Fancy Netting. 



the top or thinnest edge of the wedge, as shown by 
No. 11. Slip the loop thus formed off the wedge, and 
throw it over the hook, placing the knot at the hook. 
Then take the wedge in the left hand, and hold the 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



79 



thickest edge toward you. Bring the cord from the 
loop on the hook are/ the wedge; carry the shuttle 
up underneath, and pass it through the loop on the 
hook; pull the cord tightly, so that the sides of the 
loop through which the shuttle passes will be straight 
and tight, and the end of the loop even with the 
top of the wedge, as shown by figure No. 12, hold- 
ing the end of the loop so that the knot at the hook 
will not slip away from the hook. Place the thumb 
close to the end of the loop, holding the cord drawn 



be pressed firmly over the cord, and the cord drawn 
as tightly as possible, so that a slip knot will not be 
produced. Now slip this loop off the wedge, and 
carry the cord over the wedge, placing the top of 
the wedge close to the knot last formed, as shown 
by No. 16. Then carry the shuttle up underneath, 
and pass it up through the loop last removed from 
the wedge, as shown by No. 17; carry the shuttle 
downward over the wedge, also allowing the wedge 
to slip downward; pull the cord tightly so as to 






No. 11. 



No. 12. 



No. 13. 







No. 15. 



No. 16. 



No. 17. 



No. 18. 





No. 19. 



No. 20. 



No. 81. 



Nos. 11 to 22. — Details of Method or Making a Hammock or Tennis Net. 



No. 22. 



through the loop down tightly; now throw the cord 
up over the loop, and pass the shuttle under the 
loop hung on the hook, taking up both threads 
of the loop, as shown at No. 13. Pull the shut- 
tle through, carrying it downward and holding the 
thumb close to the loop, as shown at No. 14 ; 
take hold of the cord and pull it as tightly as possi- 
ble, still holding the thumb in the position directed, 
so that the cord will not slip. This produces the 
knot illustrated by figure No. 15. The thumb must 



draw the loop down straight and tight, and bring 
it close to the top of the wedge, as shown by No. 
18; then place the thumb close to the end of the 
loop, and press it closely over the cord, as pre- 
viously directed. Then throw the cord up over 
the loop, pass the shuttle under the loop drawn 
down, taking up both sides of the loop; then carry 
the shuttle downward over the wedge, and pull the 
cord tightly to make another knot, always holding 
the thumb closely till the knot is made. Now slip 



80 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



this loop off the wedge, and continue in the same 
manner to make knots and loops till the required 
width of the hammock is obtained. In calculating 
the width for the hammock, it will be well to re- 
member that the number of knots will be double 
the number of meshes in the width of the hammock; 
thus, if the hammock is to be forty-six meshes wide, 
which is a nice, comfortable width for a hammock 
to be used by large persons, make ninety-two knots 
in the way directed above. A child's hammock 
may be from twenty-five to thirty-five meshes wide; 
and, to obtain 
this width, 
make double 
the number of 
knots. As the 
chain of knots 
increases, the 
loop on the 
hook may be 
taken off and 
one of the 
loops nearer 
the worker 
thrown on, so 
that she may 
knot her ham- 
mock with per- 
fect ease and 
convenience. 

When the 
desired width 
is obtained, 
take off the 
loop on the 
hook, and also 
the one on the 

wedge, but do not break or cut the cord. Take a 
piece of cord half a yard or more in length, and 
pass it in and out through one of either of the two 
rows of loops or meshes made, as shown by No. 19. 
Then tie the ends of the cord thus run through, 
together in a knot, and place this loop of cord over 
the hook, as shown by No. 20. Now take the shuttle 
and wedge in hand; pass the cord over the wedge; 
carry the shuttle up underneath, and pass it up 
through the mesh nearest the working cord, as shown 
by No. 20. Carry the shuttle downward over the 
wedge, pulling the cord firmly so as to draw the loop 
down tightly, and bring it close to the top of the wedge; 
throw the cord up over the loop and pass the shuttle 
under the loop, as shown by No. 21, holding the 
thumb and drawing the cord in the same way as above 
directed for making the meshes. Keep this loop on 
the wedge, and take up the next and each succeeding 
mesh in the same way, holding a convenient number 
of loops on the wedge, as shown by No. 22. This re- 
taining of the loops or meshes on the wedge is only to 
secure a pretty regularity in their size, and also avoids 
entanglement. When a convenient number of meshes 
have been taken up in this way — and extreme care 
must be used not to skip any — take the wedge in the 
right hand, and with the left take hold of the first 
loop or mesh to the left on the wedge, and pull all 




No. 23. 



Nos. 23 and 24. — Details of Method of Making a Hammock or Tennis Net. 



except the last loop off; continue to take up the re- 
maining meshes in the same way till all have been 
taken up. Then proceed to make the next row of 
meshes in the same manner, and continue knotting 
and mesh-making till the desired length is ob- 
tained. A large-sized hammock, or one forty-six 
meshes wide, should be seven or eight feet in 
length. As the hammock lengthens, the cord on 
the hook may be taken out and run through a row 
of meshes near the netter, so that she will not have 
to change her position. This cord is simply to 

hold the net on 
the hook, and 
should be re- 
moved when 
the net is com- 
pleted. 

When the re- 
quired length 
of the ham- 
mock is ob- 
tained, cut the 
cord off, and 
draw out 
smoothly each 
end of the net 
made. Take 
the end of the 
cord cut off, 
and tie it so as 
to make a long 
loop; throw 
the loop over 
the hook, and 
hold one end 
of the net 
straight across 
in front of you. Pass the shuttle through the 
first mesh at the left side of this end, from under- 
neath, and also through the next mesh in the 
same manner ; then throw the cord over the 
hook and carry it down again; take up the next 
two meshes in the same manner and again throw 
the cord over the hook, as shown by No. 23 ; 
continue in this way till all the meshes in this 
end are taken up, to form the guys. The length 
of the guys from the end of the net to the hook 
should be about three feet in a hammock seven 
feet long. Now wind the cord tightly about the 
guys far enough below the hook to leave a ring 
sufficiently large to suspend the hammock, wind- 
ing the cord closely for several inches; then lift 
the ring of the hook and wind the cord about 
it in the same way, the method being clearly 
illustrated at No. 24. Finish the remaining end 
of the net in this manner, and the hammock will 
then be completed. 

Ladies residing in or near the city can without 
any difficulty procure steel or iron rings for the 
hammock, instead of making the cord rings, which, 
of course are not so durable. When metal rings are 
used, hang the ring to be fastened on, upon the hook, 
and run the guys through it instead of on the hook, 
and wind the cord about the guys for several inches. 




No. 24. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



81 



Two, three or more colors may be introduced in 
hammocks of this style, and the result will he very 
pretty. The cord may be light or heavy in weight, 
according to the strength required of the hammock, 
and may be purchased by the hank or pound. The 



Oblong Netting. 

No. 27. — For an oblong shape, as shown in No. 
27, the increasing for the corner must be continued 
until there are two more stitches than are required 




No. 2o. 

price asked for it is reasonable, and the cost of a 
hammock is proportionately trifling. 

The same implements and the same variety of 
stitch are essential in making a tennis net, andsuch 
work can be taught to young men and boys with 
strong hands, who can make very durable nets for this 
fascinating game. Of course, after the dimensions 
requisite for a tennis net are obtained, the ends are 
stretched instead of being drawn up for a hammock, 
and are provided with cords to attach them to posts. 

Hammocks and tennis nets, bronzed or gilded 
with liquid or dry gilding or bronzing, or dyed in 
delicate tints of blue, green, yellow, pink or lavender, 
are now utilized as house decorations, and 
form very effective draperies and portieres. 

Square Netting. 

Nos. 25 and 26. — For netting in straight lines, 
begin always at one corner with two stitches, 
and work rows forwards and backwards. At 
the end of each row increase one stitch by 
making two stitches in one at the last stitch 
until the netting is of the required width. No. 
25 shows the commencement corner. The 
straight netting may be either in squares, in an 
oblong form, in stripes, or with angular edges. 

For a Square. — Work as many holes in 
the length as in the breadth, increasing at 
the end of each row until there is one stitch 
more than the finished square of holes must 
contain in one line. For the five holes of 
the square represented at No. 26, there must 
be six stitches; then net one more row over 
this with the same number of stitches plain, 
and decrease in the same proportion, for which 
the two last stitches in each row must be net- 
ted together with one knot. 

Having by this means reduced the number again 
to two, unite the two last stitches with one knot in 
the middle. This is, however, no stitch; simply 
carry the thread tight across to the joining knots. 
All square netting is worked in this way. 




No. 26. 

Nos. 25 and 26. — Square Netting. 

for the breadth. This increasing must be continued 
without interruption on one side; but on the op- 
posite side it will be necessary always to decrease, 
so that the number of stitches always remains the 
same. When the netting is of the required length, 




No. 27. — Oblong Netting. 

the last corner must be worked by decreasing, as in 
the square. Oblongs and squares of netting are 
very pretty when done in silk for covering handker- 
chief or glove cases. They may also be made large 
enough for tidies or scarfs of any description. 



82 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Square in Meshes of Two Sizes. 

No. 28. — In making a foundation of this style, 
the work is begun in the usual manner. For the 




No. 28. — Square in Meshes op Two Sizes. 

small squares the thread is wrapped once about the 
mesh-stick; for the large squares it is wrapped 
twice. This makes a pretty foundation for darning 
fancy patterns upon. 



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No. 29. — Square op Netting 

BEGUN AT THE MIDDLE. 



Square of Net- 
ting Begun atthe 
Middle 
(With Detail). 

NOS. 29 AND 30. 

— Instead of begin- 
ning a square from 
the corner it may 
be begun from the 
middle. 

Cast on the re- 
quired number of 
loops, make an in- 
take in each row by 
omitting to take up the last loop of a row. In 
coming back, your first knot will thus be made 
over the last loop but one of the previous row. 
To complete the square, fasten the thread on again 
to the end of the thread of the first row, then make 
one similar to it, and repeat the same rows you 
made at the beginning. 

Strips of Straight Netting. 

Nos. 31 and 32. — These can be begun and 
finished in two ways. The simplest way, more 
especially when they are to be embroidered after- 
ward, is to cast on the necessary number of loops 
for the width required, to decrease on one side 
by dropping a loop (No. 32), or by joining two 
loops together with a knot (No. 31), and to in- 
crease on the other side by making 2 knots over 
1 loop. 

Great care must be taken not to change the order 
of the intakes and increases, as any mistakes of the 
kind would break the line of squares, and interfere 
with the subsequent embroidery, unless there hap- 
pened to be more loops in the strip than stitches in 



the pattern, in which case the superfluous loops 
might be cut away when the embroidery is finished. 

Straight Netting With a Pointed 
Edge. 

(For Illustration see Page 83.) 

No. ^^. — The second way of making strips of 
straight netting is to begin by making 2 loops on 
the foundation loop, then make rows with increases, 
until you have the required number of loops. Then 
work the next row down to within 2 loops of the 
lower edge, turn the work back and always increase 
1 stitch in the upper edge in every row; make 8 
rows, or until there are 4 loops in the point; this 
will leave you at the top. Now in the next row work 
down to within 4 loops of the bottom or point, then 
make the remaining 7 rows as directed; in this way 
one edge will be worked plain and the other or 
upper edge always increased. 

Any specimen of netting here illustrated may 
be used as a foundation for plain or fancy darning; 
and a neat and firm finish may be obtained by 
closely button-holing the outer edge of either. 




No. 



30. — Detail op Square of Netting begun 
at the Middle. 



For detail of button-holing, see No. 50, page 100. 

Linen or wash silk floss is usually selected for 

darning. India floss is as soft and smooth as silk 

and closely resembles it in effect. The darning 



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No. 31. — Strip of Straight Netting. 



floss and the foundation thread should match in 
tint to produce the most satisfactory results. Net- 
ting done with linen may be darned with silk. 

Further on in the pamphlet will be found 
numerous patterns and stitches for darning netting. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



83 



Angular Edge for Handkerchief 
Borders, E re. 

No. 34- — For an angular edge round pocket 
handkerchiefs, renters, or the outer edge 
of a square with a thick center-piece of 
linen, etc., it is advisable to place the design 
before one. The commencing point may 
be easily known by the circle of thread 
which forms the upper corner of the square. 
Beginning with a corner, increase until there 
are two more than double the number of 
stitches that are required for the breadth; 
therefore, for the edge of No. 34, which is 
three stitches broad, eight stitches will be 
required. Then the part marked with dotted 
lines a 1 to a 2 must be worked with four 
stitches as far as the half of the corner; and 
then turning round with these stitches, continue 



beginning) corner, cut off the thread at the last row 
at the inner edge ( see C I to C 2) according to the 
knot </ 1 ; the thread is then put on again at the 
upper corner and, according to the dotted line, the 
tir>t row of the side edge as far as d 2 is to be work- 




No. 32.— Strip of Straight Netting Edged with 
Kmpty Loops. 

(For Description see Page 82.) 




No. 34. — Angular Edge for Handkerchief Borders. 



the stripe, always increasing at the outer and de- 
creasing at the inner edge. For the next corner at 
the inner edge, where until now the decreasing has 
been carried on, following the row marked b 1 and 
b 2, after the decreasing, make one more stitch in 
the outermost edge stitch, and with this begin the 



ed. The work is then continued as at the first half 
of the edge as far as the under corner, and on arriv- 
ing there the thread is again cut off at the inner side. 
Put the thread on afresh at the knot marked ,^; and, 
according to the design, in the next row enclose the 
two inner stitches where the cut-off thread hangs, 




No. 33. — Straight Nettivg with a Pointed Edge. 
(For Description see Page K2.) 



increasing for the second side of the inner edge; at 
the outer edge decrease in the same proportion. 
Having arrived at the third (the opposite one to the 



together with the one which forms the corner, and 
must now be completed as for a square by decreas- 
ing at the end of each row. This is the last corner. 



84 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Wire Frame for Embroidering Netting. 



wadding or tow, as shown in No. 35, and then 
with tape, which must be wound tightly and very 
No. 35. — In order to darn or embroider netting closely round it, more particularly at the corners, 
successfully, it should be stretched upon a frame so that it may be quite firm and not twist about 





No. 35. — Wire Frame for Embroidering Netting. 



No. 36.— Mounting Netting on a Frame. 



after the manner of drawn work ; and it is a very 
good plan to dampen it with borax water and press 
it before basting it to the frame. After the work 
is removed then all that will be necessary to com- 
plete it will be to press the darning or embroidery. 
The frame on which the net is to be stretched 
should be made of a strong iron wire that will not 
bend in the using. In shape it may be square or 



when the netting is sewn in. The ends of the 
tape should be secured by two or three stitches. 

Mounting Netting on a Frame. 

Nos. 36, 37 and 38. — No. 36 shows the netting 
in the process of being sewed to an ordinary un- 
covered frame. When the netting is exactly the 





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No. 37. No. 38. 

Nos. 37 and 38. — Mounting Netting on a Frame. 



oblong, according to whether squares or edgings 
are to be made upon it, but the sides must be 
straight, so that the net can be evenly stretched. 
This wire frame must be covered, first with 



size of the inside of the frame, it need only be 
secured to it with overcasting stitches set very 
closely at the corners. 

When the netting is smaller, the space between it 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



85 



and the frame must be filled up with strong, very 
evenly woven tape, sewn on all round the netting. 
The tape must be very tightly held in the sewing, 
so that it even forms little gathers all round; this 
will help you to stretch the netting in mounting 
it without injuring it, and is especially necessary 
when the netting is not quite evenly made. No. 38 
shows how the tape is sewn on, the fold that has to 
he made at the corners, and the way to fix the 
netting into the frame. 

Long strips or large pieces of work can be 
mounted on wax-cloth; but the process of shorten- 
ing the preparatory work in this manner is not 




No. 39.— Circular Netting of Long and Short Loops. 

recommended, as the squares of netting are never 
so regular as when they are made in a frame. 

Circular Netting of Long and 
Short Loops. 



a large 

filoselle, 



No. 39. — Make 30 or 31 loops over 
mesh with a coarse materal, such as 
then draw up the thread on which the 
loops are strung, as tightly as possible, 
so as to form quite a small ring for the 
center, and fasten off, tying very securely 
and neatly. ("Mesh" is same as "mesh- 
stick.") 

Next r<no. — Fasten the thread onto a 
long loop and make 1 loop into each 
loop of the first row, over a small mesh. 
Use the same mesh for all the subse- 
quent rows, which should be worked 
in a finer thread, such as knitting silk. 

If you want to avoid fastening on 
the thread afresh for each row, make a 
loop over the thumb as follows: Put 
the thread, as for a plain loop, over the 
mesh and the thumb, and then put the 
needle through the loop, as though for 
a plain loop; but before tightening the 
knot, draw the mesh out of the loop just made, 
and make it exactly as long as the loop above. 



Circular NETTING FORMED BY Incrkasks ok 
Widenings, 

No. 40. — Make 10 loops on the foundation loop, 
close the ring, then proceed by making a row with 




No. 40. — Circular Netting Formed by Increases 
or Widenings. 



1 knot in the first loop and 2 in the second, until 
the net attains the right circumference; in the 
subsequent rows, increase by 1 loop; that is, make 

2 knots in each of the previous increases. 

Loose Loops in Clusters. 

Nos. 41 and 42. — Clusters of loose loops are 
made in the following manner: 

First row. — One loop, the knot of which must be 
a little distance from the mesh; put the thread over 
the mesh (mesh-stick) and the needle through the 
loop where the knot is; repeat this three or four 
times, making the loops all of the same length. Then 
unite all the loops with one knot, carrying the 
needle from right to left, around the loops, instead 
of putting it through the loop of the previous row. 

Second row. — Make 1 loop over each loop of the 
first row, leaving out the loops that form the cluster. 




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No. 41. No. « 

Nos. -11 and 42.— Louse Loops in Clusters. 

As may be seen from the engraving, many 
different patterns can be worked upon the netting. 



86 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Swiss Diamond Netting. 
No. 43. — For this effective pattern cast on any 




process of drawing up the knot); work 4 plain 

stitches, and repeat from * to the end of the row. 

Second row. — One long stitch, 3 plain stitches, 

* 1 long stitch into the center of the long stitch 
of last row, 1 long stitch into the next plain 
stitch, 3 plain stitches, and repeat from *. 

Third row. — One long stitch, 2 plain stitches, 

* 1 long stitch into the next long stitch, 1 plain 
into the next long stitch, 1 long stitch into the 
next plain stitch, 2 plain stitches, and repeat 
from *, and end with 1 long stitch. 

Fourth row. — One plain stitch, 1 long stitch, 
1 plain stitch, 1 long stitch, * 2 plain stitches, 1 
long stitch, 1 plain stitch, 1 long stitch, and 
repeat from *. 

Fifth row. — One plain stitch, 2 long stitches, 



No. 43 — Swiss Diamond Netting. 

number of stitches divisible by five, leaving four 
stitches over at the end to make the edges corres- 
pond with each other. 

First row. — Work 4 plain stitches, * work 1 long 
stitch by passing the thread twice round the mesh 





No. 44. — Diamond Netting. 
(For Description see Page 87.) 



(to do this twist the thread once round the mesh 
before encircling the loops round the fingers; the 
other part of the stitch is made in the ordinary 



No- 45. — Square Diamond Nettdng. 
(For Description see Page 87.) 



* 3 plain, 2 long, and repeat from *, ending 
with 1 plain stitch. 

Sixth row. — Two plain stitches, 1 long stitch, 

* 4 plain, 1 long, and repeat from *, ending 
with 1 plain stitch. 

Seventh row. — One plain stitch, 2 long stitch- 
es, * 3 plain, 2 long, and repeat from *, end- 
ing with 1 plain stitch. 

Eighth row. — One plain stitch, 1 long stitch, 
1 plain stitch, 1 long stitch, * 2 plain, 1 long, 1 
plain, 1 long, and repeat from *. 

Ninth row. — One long stitch, 2 plain stitches, 
1 long stitch, * 1 plain, 1 long, 2 plain, 1 long, 
and repeat from *. 

Tenth row. — One long stitch, 3 plain stitches, * 2 
long, 3 plain, and repeat from *, This completes 
one pattern. Repeat the pattern frc.n the first row. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



87 



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Diamond Netting. 

(Kor lllustrati.Mi Me l'i 

No. 44. — An uneven number of stitches will be 
required tor this pattern. Cast on about 15 stitches 
to mike a sample piece to get the stitch perfect. 

First row. — Net 1 stitch in the ordinary manner; 
make the next stitch a long stitch by twisting the 
thread twice round the mesh, and repeat; the row 
will end with a plain stitch as it began. 

5 <>//./ row. — Plain netting, making even the 
stitches of the 
row just made. 

Third rate. 
— One long 
Stitch, 1 plain 
stitch, and re- 
peat; end the 
row with a 
long stitch as 
it began. 

Fourth row. 
— Plain net- 
ting. Repeat 
these four 
r . iws for the 
length re- 
quired. 

Square Dia- 
mond Net- 
ting. 

(For illustration see 
Page 86.) 

No. 45.— 

This is the 
same stitch as 
the diamond 
pattern, only 
it is worked 
so as to form 
a series of 
squares in- 
stead of dia- 
monds. Put 
on 2 stitches 
for the corner, 
and at the 
end of each 
row increase 
a stitch by 

working 2 stitches in the last stitch of last row. 
The pattern is formed by passing the thread once 
round the mesh for the small holes, and twice 
round the mesh for the large holes. In process 
of working be careful that a long stitch always 
comes under a short stitch, first one and then the 
other alternately. A square suitable for guipure 
netting or an oblong piece may be made in this 
way, and afterward darned in any of the stitches 
shown on following pages. Bring the last corner to 
a 1 oint by taking 2 loops together at the end of 
every row, and fasten off neatly and securely. 



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No. 46. — Diagonal Netting with Crossed Loops. 



Diagonal Netting with Crossed Loops. 

No. 46. — To work this simple and effective pat- 
tern, begin by making a strip of plain netting, 14 
loops in width, for the middle. When it is long 
enough for your purpose, take up all the loops on 
one side on a strong thread; fasten the work to the 
cushion again, and work 3 rows along the other 
edge in the following manner: 

First row. — Long loops, made by the thread be- 
ing passed three times in succession over the mesh. 

Second renv. 
— H ere 3 
loops are so 
made as to 
cross each 
other; that is, 
you begin by 
putting your 
netting needle 
at first into 
the 3rd loop, 
counting from 
left to right, 
then into the 
1st, and lastly 
into the mid- 
dle one of the 
three, so that 
the right loop 
leans to the 
left and the 
left one to the 
right. 

Third row. 
— One plain 
loop in each 
of the loops of 
the previous 
row. You now 
draw out the 
thread run in 
on the other 
side, and run 
it in through 
the loops last 
made, in order 
to make three 
rows again, as 
above describ- 
ed, on the low- 
er edge. 
When this is done you begin the points. Work 
in 14 loops with the small mesh, working 3 rows 
and narrowing once in each row, by leaving the last 
loop unworked; now make the long loops in the 
center of the point for the crossed design as shown 
in the heading, and, after crossing the loops, finish 
the points as shown in the picture. Break the 
thread and begin the next point as shown in the 
illustration. 

Netted edgings may be made of linen with pat- 
terns afterwards embroidered upon them in wash 
silk, which shows well upon a linen foundation. 



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88 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Rose Netting in 
No. 47. — This design is 



Stripes. 
suitable for curtains, 




First row. — Net quite plain over a mesh about a 
third of an inch in width. 

Second row. — Net over a knitting needle thus: 
First draw the 1st long loop through 
the 2nd, and net it, then draw the 2nd 
long loop through the 1st and net it. 
Repeat throughout the row. No. 48 
clearly illustrates the mode of working 
this row. The 1st loop is shown drawn 
through the 2nd, ready for netting, at 
the lower middle of illustration, and 
the arrow represents the needle inserted 
ready for working the 2nd loop. 

The 1st and 2nd rows are repeated 
alternately for the required length, loop- 
ing the stitches so that the pattern is 
reversed. 



Diamond Pattern. 

No. 50. — This design is suitable for 
foundations of shawls, or for stripes for 
clouds, antimacassars, etc. 

First row. -Plain. 

Second row. — Work two loops into a 
stitch, draw the next loop rather longer, 
and repeat to the end of the row. 

Third row. — One stitch into each 
loop of last row. 

Fourth row. — Work a stitch through 
two loops together under the two loops 
worked into a stitch in second row. 



No. 47. — Rose Netting in Stripes. 




No. 48. — Detail of Rose Netting. 



antimacassars, 
shawls, etc. 
It consists of 
stripes of 
rose-netting 
which are 
worked ac- 
cording to 
the directions 
given for No. 
49. Four pat- 
terns of the 
rose-netting 
are alternated 

with six rows of plain netting. The plain stripes are 
darned in small squares or diamonds (see design). 

Rose Netting, with Detail. 

Nos. 48, 49, and 52. — No. 48 shows the detail of 
rose-netting; and No. 52, rose-netting with ribbon 
velvet run in at each fifth pattern ; the rose-netting 
is darned with silk or wool of a color contrasting 
with that of the netting. This pattern would make 
very pretty shawls netted with white wool, darned 
with pink, maize, or blue silk, and having narrow 
black ribbon velvet run in as seen at No. 52. 



Repeat to the 
end of the 
row. Repeat 
from the first 
row. The 
double loops 
are worked 
across with a 
needle and 
cotton, as 
shown in the 
upper part of 
illustration. 




No. 49. — Rose Netting. 




No. 50. — Diamond Pattern. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



89 



Diagonal Netting. 

No. 51. — Commence with an even number of 

stitches. 

First row — Insert the point of the needle in the 
1st loop and draw the 2nd loop downwards through 
it; net a stitch in the 2nd loop, and then mi 1 
stitch in the 1st loop, not twisting the loops at all; 
insert the point of the needle in the 3rd loop, and 
draw the 4th loop downwards through it; net a 
stitch in the 4th loop, and then a stitch in the 3rd 
loop; and continue crossing the loops and netting 
them, to the end of the row. 



No. 51. — Diagonal Netting. 



Second row. — Net the 1st loop plain; with the 
point of the needle pass the 3rd loop downwards 
through the 2nd loop, net a stitch in the 3rd loop, 
and then net a 
stitch in the 2nd 
loop; then pass the 
5th loop downwards 
through the 4th 
loop, and net it, 
and then net the 
4th loop, and pro- 
ceed in like man- 
ner to the end 
of the row, where 
net the last stitch 
plain. 

Third nn^. — Same 
as the second row. 

Fourth rcm<. — Work same as the first row. 

Repeat from the first row. It will be found that 
the 2nd and 3rd rows have each an edge stitch, 




No. 53. — Star NETTING. 



but that the 1st and 4th rows have not. The 
pattern runs diagonally across from edge to edge. 

Star Netting, with Detail. 
Nos. 53 and 54. — First row. — One double and 








No. 52. — Rose Netting, with Ribbon Run In in 
Every Fifth Pattern. 

(For Description eee Nos. 48, 49 and 52, Page 88.) 



one plain stitch alternately with a No. 12 
knitting needle. 

Second row. — Net plain with a mesh a third 

of an inch wide. 

Third row. — Draw one stitch of second row 

through long loop of first row, net it with a short 

stitch, draw the next loop through the same long 




No. 54.— Detail of Star Netti.vo. 



loop of first row, and net it with a long stitch (/'. e., 
cotton twice round the mesh). Repeat the second 
and third rows for length required. 



90 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Round Netting. 
No. 55. — Round netting much resembles plain 




No. 55. — Round Netting. 



netting in appearance and manner of working, 
but by a trifling difference in the method of passing 
the needle through the loop the stitches 
become a little twisted, and a closer and 
rounder looking stitch is produced. It 
may be commenced with any number 
of stitches. When these are put on the 
foundation string, and the mesh is with- 
drawn and placed in position ready for 
working the second row, proceed as fol- 
lows: Form the loop on the fingers in 
the usual manner, and pass the needle 
upwards through the loop encircling the 
third and second fingers and between the 
mesh and the forefinger, but not taking 
up the netted stitch of last row; retain the 
position of the thumb and fingers, and loop 
while you draw the needle so far up as to 
bring the thread from it close under the 
little finger; turn the needle round, and 
insert it through the stitch of preceding 
row downwards over the mesh, the thread 
being to the right of the needle; draw 
through, and let loops slip one by one from 
the fingers; draw knot in firmly, and con- 
tinue with every stitch in the same manner. 

Open Twisted Netting. 

No. 56. — Two meshes will be required. 
Cast an even number of stitches upon the founda- 
tion string, and begin by doing 2 rows of plain 
netting with the smallest mesh. 



Third row. — With the largest mesh, net 1 stitch 
in each loop of the preceding row. 

Fourth roiu. — With the small mesh, place the 
thread in position on the fingers as usual, 
and pass the needle upwards through the 
loop encircling the 3rd and 2nd fingers, 
and between the mesh and the forefinger, 
and now draw the needle up, carefully re- 
taining the position of the thumb and finger 
and loop, while you draw the needle far 
enough up to bring the thread from it 
close under the little finger; insert the 
needle in the 1st loop of the preceding 
row, and to produce the coiled appearance 
shown in the engraving (No. 56), twist 
the loop twice from right to left round 
itself, then release the loops from the 
fingers and tighten the knot. Work to 
the end of the row similarly. 

Fifth row. — Plain netting with the small 
mesh. 

Sixth row. — Plain netting with the large 
mesh. 

Seventh row. — With the small mesh, 
draw the is,t loop of previous row upwards 
through the 2nd loop of the same row, and 
net a stitch in it; then look through the 1st 
loop, the upper part of which is now secured 
in the knot you have just formed, and you 
will see a portion of the 2nd loop crossing 
along just below; draw this part of the 2nd 
loop up through the little opening under 
the knot, and net a stitch in it, and entwine every 
2 loops together in this manner to the end of the row. 




No. 56. — Open Twisted Netting. 



Eighth row. — Plain netting with the small mesh. 
Repeat from the 4th row for the length required, 
and break off at the termination of the 5th row. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



1)1 



Bunch Netting. 

No. 57. — Procure meshes of 3 different sizes 
Begin with any number of stitches divisible 
by 3, and allow 2 stitches over at the end of 
the row to bring the pattern in nicely. 

First row. — Plain netting on middle-sized 
mesh. 

>S end row. — The same. 
Third row. — With the largest mesh, net 2 
stitches plain, net 5 stitches in the next loop, 
and repeat, ending with 2 plain stitches. 

Fourth row. — With the smallest mesh, net 
1 stitch in every loop of the preceding row. 
Fifth row. — Plain netting, with smallest mesh. 
Sixth row. — Plain netting, with largest mesh. 
Seventh row. — With middle mesh, net plain 
the two first loops of last row, * take up the 5 
ne\t loops, all on the needle, and net them 
together as 1 stitch (these are the 5 loops 
which were before increased), net the 2 next 
consecutive loops plain, and repeat from *. 
Eighth row. — Plain netting, with same mesh. 
Repeat the pattern from the 3rd row. 
A pleasing variation can be made in this 
pattern by working the second line of 
"bunches "in intermediate positions between 
those made in the first line. ' 

Grecian Netting. 

No. 58. — Two meshes of different size are 
necessary for the production of this pattern. For 
the smaller of the two meshes select a steel knitting 



ing about a third of an inch in width. Cast upon 

the foundation string any even number of stitches. 

First row. — Plain netting, with the large mesh. 





X< K 57. — Bi'Nf. 



Xhi rtHo. 



needle No. 9, and for the other a wooden needle 
No. 6, or what is better, a flat bone mesh, measur- 



No. 58. — Grecian Netting. 



Second row. — With the small mesh, draw the 1st 
loop of previous row upwards through the 2nd 
loop of the same row, and net a stitch in it; 
then look through the 1st loop, the upper 
part of which is now secured in the knot 
you have just formed, and you will see a 
portion of the 2nd loop crossing along 
just below; draw this part of the 2nd 
loop up through the little opening under the 
knot, and net a stitch in it; entwine every 
two loops together in this manner to the end 
of the row. 

Third row. — Plain netting, with the large 
mesh. 

Fourth row. — With the small mesh, net a 
plain stitch in the 1st loop of previous row, 
then draw the 2nd loop upwards through the 
3rd loop, and net a stitch in it, and next bring 
the 2nd loop up through the little opening 
under the knot, and net a stitch in it and con- 
tinue, finishing with a plain stitch at the end 
of the row. 

Fifth row. — Plain netting, with the large 
mesh. Repeat from the 2nd row. The pat- 
tern is complete upon the termination of the 
3rd row. 

Another form of Grecian netting is a simple 
continuation of the 1st and 2nd rows only, by 
which means the large holes are produced one 
over the other in a straight line. Whichever 
way it be done, Grecian netting is a favorite 
pattern for purses, mittens, neck-handkerchiefs, 
shawls, curtains, and numberless other articles. 



92 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Looped Netting. 

No. 59. — Put on as many stitches as required for 
the width of the work. 

First row. — Thread twice round the mesh, and 
net 1 stitch, then 
with the thread once 
round the mesh net 
2 more stitches in • 
the same place; 
repeat this in every 
loop to the end of 
the row. Every suc- 
ceeding row is the 
same, inserting the 
needle under the 
long loop of last 
row, and missing 
the 2 short loops. 
A very lacy-looking 
pattern results. 

Loose-Loop 
Pattern. 

No. 60. — First and 
Second rows. — Plain 
netting. 

Third row. — Two 
plain loops, place 
the working thread 
as usual, over the 
mesh, and pass the 
needle close over the 
nearest knot of the 
last row but one 

from underneath perpendicularly, put the thread 
round the mesh again, and let the needle go again 
through the same stitch from underneath upwards, 
and then work a common stitch in the next stitch of 
the last row, so that the thread is put three times round 
the mesh as shown in the lower right hand corner of 




No. 59. — Looped Netting. 



clusters of loops come between the clusters of third 
row. 

Design in Long and Crossed Loops. 

No. 61. — This design is worked with knitting silk 

and Shetland wool 
or floss. 

First and Second 
rows. — Work in 
plain netting with 
silk and a mesh 
a quarter of an inch 
in breadth. 

Third row. — With 
doubled wool and a 
half-inch mesh, work 
two stitches into one 
loop, and one stitch 
into each of the next 
two loops. Repeat 
from the beginning 
of the row. 

Fourth row. — 
Take the long loop 
at the left of a short 
loop, pass it through 
the short loop, and 
net it with silk and 
the smaller mesh; 
take the next long 
loop and pass it 
through the same 
short loop, and net 
it. Repeat to the 
end of the row. 
into each loop of last 



Fifth row. — Oae stitch 
row. 

Sixth row. — With double wool and the large 
mesh net one stitch into each loop of last row. 

Seventh and Eighth rows. — With silk and the 
small mesh work like fifth row. 





No. 60. — Loose-Loop Pattern. 



No. 61. — Design in Long and Crossed Loops. 



illustration. Repeat from the beginning of the row. Ninth and Tenth rows. — Like third and fourth 

Fourth and Fifth rows. — Plain. rows. 

Sixth row. — Like third row, working so that the Eleventh row. — Work this row like the fifth row. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



98 



Oriel Netting. 

No. 62. — Commence with any even number of 
stitches. 

First row. — This row is worked in plain netting. 

Second row. — ( ) ne 
plain stitch and 1 
long stitch worked 
alternately. 

Third raw. — Long 
stitch netting, that 
is with thread twice 
round the mesh to 
every stitch. 

Four tli row. — 
Draw the first loop 
of last row upwards 
through the 1st long 
loop of the 2nd row, 
and net a plain stitch 
in it; draw the 2nd 
loop of last row up 
in the same place, 
and net in it a plain 
stitch, and continue. 
Repeat the last 2 
rows for the length 
desired. 



No. 62.— Oriel Netting. 



Fancy Netting. 



No. 63. — Patterns 
of this kind are 
made by netting the 

meshes together in regular sequence, and tak- 
ing up as many meshes as you have netted to- 
gether, or vice versa. You may increase and de- 
crease in the same rows, or at intervals of so many 
rows. 

Two sizes of thread should be used for this pat- 
tern. Begin by 3 rows of plain netting with the 
finer thread over the small mesh, followed by 1 row 




1 row, with 2 loops in every 1, so that the number 
of loops remains the same. These are followed by 
3 rows of plain netting with the fine thread on the 
small mesh. Then work again with the larger mesh. 
The design may be made as wide as desired, and 

is pretty as an in- 
sertion. 



Stripe Netting. 

No. 64. — This re- 
quires an even num- 
ber of stitches. 

First row. — Net a 
plain row. 

Second row. — 
Miss the 1st stitch, 
net the 2nd, then 
the 1 st, and so on 
till the end of the 
row. 

These two rows 
form the pattern. 

Honeycomb- 
Netting. 



No. 65. — An even 
number of stitches 
are needed for this 
pattern. 

First row. — Plain 
netting. 

Second row. — Net 
the 2nd stitch, then the 1st, next the 4th, then the 
3rd; work thus to the end of the row. 
Third row. — Plain. 

Fourth row. — Net a plain stitch; begin the pat- 
tern by netting the 3rd stitch, then the 2nd, next 
the 5th, then the 4th; end with a plain stitch, and 
continue to the end of the row. Repeat from 
1st row as many times as may be necessary to 



\f\(\r\r\f\f\f\f\i\f\ 
A / \ / \ A / \ A A/\A A ) 
\ A /\ /\j\ A fS/S/S A a 

I.A.A/\AA 

• A A / \ A A A / w \ A 
,- . A/v'V x > A/ \A Ax A,' 

\ A / \ A A A A A / v / \ A , 



I A A A A A 





l. — Fancy Nbttino. 



No. 64. — Stripe Netting. 



No. 65. — Honeycomb Netting. 



of the coarser thread over the large mesh; then, make the work as deep as desired. Either of the 
with the coarse thread over the large mesh, make 1 two designs last described will form pretty founda- 
row, in which you net every 2 loops together, and tions for shawls, capes, center-pieces, etc. 



94 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



No. 66. 



Leaf Netting. 
-For leaf netting, commence with any 




No. 66. — Leaf Netting. 



Tenth row. — Plain. Repeat from the 3rd row 
for the length required, and leave off after doing 
the 6th row. Count the stitches in the plain row 
after every leaf, to ascertain that none 
have been increased or diminished. 
From its extreme lightness this pat- 
tern is pretty for a veil, for mittens, 
and for a variety of other purposes. 



Spike Netting. 

No. 67. — Cast any uneven number 
of stitches upon the foundation 
string. 

First row. — Plain netting. 

Second row. — Work 4 stitches into 
the first loop, and 1 stitch in the next 
loop; 4 stitches in the next, and 1 
stitch in the next, and so on alter- 
nately, and end with 4 stitches in the 
last loop of the row. 

Third row. — Plain netting, gather- 
ing together the group of increased 
stitches as one. 

Fourth row. — One plain stitch in 
the first loop, and 1 spike of 4 stitches 
in the next loop, and repeat. The 
spike stitches are to come between 
the groups of spike stitches in the 
second row. 

Fifth row. — Plain, gathering the 4 



number of stitches divisible by 4, and 
allow 2 stitches over at the end to bring 
the pattern in nicely. Net 2 plain rows. 

Third row. — Net 3 stitches in the first 
loop, 3 in the next, * 2 consecutive 
stitches plain, 3 in the next loop, and 3 
in the next, and repeat from *. 

Fourth row. — Gather together on the 
needle the first 5 loops of last row, pick- 
ing them up in rotation from left to 
right; these are the increased stitches of 
last row, and they form the "leaf "; knot 
them together as 1 stitch, net 3 consecu- 
tive stitches plain, and repeat, ending 
with a "leaf" and 1 plain stitch. 

Fifth row. — Plain netting. 

Sixth row. — Plain. 

Seventh row. — Net the first 2 loops 
plain, * do 3 stitches in the next loop, 3 
in the next, then 2 stitches plain, and 
repeat from *. 

Eighth row. — Net 2 stitches plain to 
begin, * pick up the next 5 loops on the 
needle and knot them together as 1 
stitch, net 3 consecutive stitches plain, 
repeat from * to the end of the row, 
where there will be 2 stitches to net 
instead of 3. The "leaves" in this row are formed 
in intermediate positions between those already done. 

Ninth row. — Plain netting. 




No. 67. — Spike Netting. 



spike stitches together as one. Repeat the pattern 
from the second row. This is a pretty pattern for 
almost any article of netting. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 






Spiim k N etting. 

No. 6S. — Two meshes are required for this. 
Commence with an even number of stitches, 
and work 3 rows of plain netting with the 
smallest mesh. 

Fourth row. — With the large mesh net 1 
stitch in each loop of last row. 

Fifth row, — Also with the large mesh, take 
up the 2nd loop; and net a stitch; then the 

1 st loop, and net a stitch; next the 4th loop, 
then the 3rd loop, and so on, doing alternately 
a stitch forward and a stitch backward to the 
end of the row, and so crossing the stitches 
that they present the appearance shown in 
engraving No. 68. Now work 3 rows of plain 
netting with the smallest mesh, and repeat the 
pattern from the 4th row. 

Double Leaf Netting. 

No. 69. — This much resembles leaf netting, 
but the leaves are double, and therefore more 
distinct. Cast upon the foundation string any 
number of stitches divisible by 4, with 2 
stitches over at the end to allow for uniform- 
ity of pattern. Work 2 rows of plain netting. 

Third and Fifth raws. — Net 3 stitches in 
the first loop, 3 in the next loop, * then do 

2 consecutive stitches plain, 3 in the next 
loop, and 3 in the next, and repeat from *. 

Fourth and Sixth rows. — Gather together 
on the needle the first 5 loops of last row, and knot 
them together as 1 stitch, net 3 stitches plain, *pick 



Seventh and Eighth rows. — Net these rows plain. 

Ninth and Eleventh rows. — Net 2 consecutive 

stitches plain to begin, * net 3 in the next loop, 3 




No. >;s. — Spider Netting. 



up the next 5 loops together and knot them as 1 
stitch, net 3 stitches plain, and repeat from *, and 
end the row with a "leaf" and 1 plain stitoh. 




No. 69. — Double Leaf Netting. 



in the next, then 2 stitches plain, and repeat 
from *. 

Tenth and Twelfth rows. — Net 2 stitches plain, 
* pick up on the needle the next 5 loops together, 
and knot them as 1 stitch, net 3 consecutive stitches 
plain, repeat from *, and at the end of the row 
there will be 2 stitches to net plain. 

Thirteenth and Fourteenth rows. — Net these rows 
plain. 

Repeat the pattern from the 3rd row. When a 
sufficient length is worked, break off after working 
the 8th row. 

Beaded Netting. 

(No Illustration.) 

Netting may be beaded as follows: Take a fine, 
long darning needle, and having threaded it with a 
sufficient length of silk, pick up a bead and slip it 
along close up to the mesh, net a stitch in the next 
loop as usual and then pass the needle again through 
the bead in the upward direction, thus bringing it 
on the knot; pick up another bead and repeat to 
end of row. 

In forming a pattern pick up 4 or 6 beads at a 
time, according to size of mesh; slip them down to 
last knot made, and net a stitch in next loop as 
usual. In the next row more beads are picked up, 
and the beads of last row are divided by the knot, 
so that 2 beads on 3 beads come on each side of 
the knot. Designs in diamonds, crosses, lozenges 
etc., may thus be formed. 



96 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Mosaic Netting. 

No. 70. — Cast upon the foundation string any 
even number of stitches. 

First rotv. — Net the first loop in the ordinary 




No. 70. — Mosaic Netting. 



manner, make the next stitch a long stitch by 
twisting the thread twice round the mesh (to 
do this twist the thread once round the mesh 
before encircling the thread round the fingers; 
the other twist is given in process of drawing 
up the knot), and continue 1 plain stitch and 
1 long stitch to the end of the row. 

Second row. — Plain netting. The stitches 
of last row being uneven in length, the 
stitches of this row will naturally draw 
uneven also. 

Third row. — Work alternately 1 long stitch 
and 1 plain stitch in this manner; draw the 
first loop of last row upwards through the 
first long loop of the first row, and net a long 
stitch in it; the pressure arising from this 
action causes the 2nd loop of last row to 
come partially up in the same place; draw 
it up a little more prominently, and net a plain 
stitch in it, and proceed to the end of the 

Fourth row. — Plain netting. 

Fifth row.— Begin with 1 plain stitch in the 
first loop of last row, then continue 1 long stitch 
and 1 plain stitch alternately, drawing the loops of 
the 4th row up through the long loops of the 3rd 
row, in the same manner as instructed for the work- 



ing of the 3rd row; end the row with 1 long stitch 
in the last loop. 

Sixth row. — This row is worked in plain netting. 

Repeat from the 3rd row for the remainder of the 
work. 

Open-Work and Darned Stripe. 

No. 71. — Work seven plain rows over a small 
mesh. 

Eighth row. — With a mesh a size larger, work one 
stitch into each stitch of previous row. 

Ninth row. — With the same mesh net two stitches 
together throughout. 

Tenth row. — Net two stitches into one through- 
out. Repeat from the beginning of the pattern. 

The darning is worked with wool or silk of a 
contrasting color (see design). 

Netted Foundation Interlaced with 
a Needle and Thread. 

No. 72. — The foundation consists of plain rows 
of netting worked with a contrasting color or 
material from end to end; the mode of working is 
too clearly illustrated to need description. The 
pattern is varied by each row being darned as seen 
in the engraving, where the detail is shown. 

Stripe for Shawls, etc. 

No. 73. — This design is worked with single zephyr. 
First and Second rows — Plain over a small mesh. 
Third row. — With a mesh double the size, and 





No. 72. — Netted Foundation Inter- 
laced with a Needle and Thread. 



No. 



row. 



71. — Open-Work and 
Darned Stripe. 




No. 73. — Stripe for Shawls, etc. 



doubled wool, one stitch into each stitch of last row. 

Fourth row. — With the small mesh and single 
wool, plain netting. 

Fifth row. — Like third row. 

Sixth and Seventh rows.-~L\ke first and second rows. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



97 



STITCHES AND DESIGNS FOP^ DAMNING NETTING. 



The engravings on this and following pages are 
so accurate in detail that is not necessary to pro- 
vide descriptions for their development. The plain 
darning stitch is familiar to every one who has ever 
wielded the darning needle, and is clearly depicted 



edgings and decorations in general. Linen thread 
and linen floss are principally used in making net- 
ting that is to be darned Darned or, as it is often 
called guipure, netting is suitable for many pur- 
poses — for the decoration of personal or household 




No. 1. 






No. 4. 



No. 3. 

Linen Stitch: Formation op a 
Corner. 




No. 2. 





No. 5. 




No. 6. 



No. 7. 



No. 8. 






No. 9. No. 10. No. 11. 

Nos. i to 7.— Linen Darning Stitch. Nos. 8 to 11.— Plain Darning Stitch. 



on this page. Linen stitch is also here faithfully 
shown, No. 3 making the method of turning a cor- 
ner a matter easy to accomplish. Loop darning is 
pretty for open patterns, while stars, leaves, wheels, 
rosettes etc., are exceedingly ornamental in making 



linen, draperies, curtains, or in fact anything that 
can be trimmed with lace. In other following de- 
partments may be seen various articles of darned 
netting, and others which may be further beauti- 
fied by darning them in handsome patterns. 



98 



TATTING AND NETTING. 




No. 12. 




No. 13. 




No. 14. 




No. 19. 





No. 15. 




No. SO. 




No. 23. 



No. 24. 



No. 22. 



Nos. 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, It, 18, 20 
and 23.— Loop Darning. 






No. 16. 




No. 17. 



mz^kSkSsAsto 



No. 18. 




No. 21. 




No. 25. 



Nos. 19, 21, 22, 24 and 25.— Fancy 

Darning in Loops, "Wheels, 

Stars, Leaves, Etc. 



No. 26.— Button-Hole and Picot Stitches. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



99 




No. 27. 
Loop Stitch Completed 



No. 28. 



Loop Stitch (Fikst and Second 
Courses ok the Thread), 






No. 30. 



No, 31. 



No. 32. 




No. 33. 




No. 34. 




Nos. 28, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34 and 35._Fanct Stars with Details. 



No. 35. 






No. 36. 



No. 37. 



N'' s 36, 37 and 38.— Point d'Angleterre Rosettes. 



No. 38. 



100 



TATTING AND NETTING. 




■■ HI 



No. 40. 



No. 44. 



No. 47. 




No. 41. 
Nos. 39 to 43. — Stak Darning. 





No. 45. 







No. 43. 




No. 43. 




No. 46. 




NO. 48. 




No. 49. 
Nos. 44 to 49. — Fancy Darning. 



No. 50.— Button-Hole Edge tor Netted Lace. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



LOJ 



fancy Dg<;ign<;, With illusthatgD OeTAiu; 

DAMNED OH GUIPU^e NGTTING. 



FOI^ 




No. 8. 




No. 11. 




No. 12. 




Ksynxifxi 


Ipkr; 




[jI-Ijl! 




No. 6. 



No. 4 



No. 3. 



No. 9. 



-j r &&* -M* 'im 






No. 7. 

Nos. l to V. — Fancy De- 
sign, with Details. 




No. 10. 

Nos. 8 to 10. — Fancy De- 
sign, with Details. 




No. 13. 



No. U. 

Nos. 11 to 14. — Fancy Design, with 

Details. 





No. 15. No 10. 

Nos. 15 and 16. — Fancy Design and Detail. 



No. 17. — Lea? Darning. 



102 



TATTING AND NETTING. 











No. 80. 




No. 21. 




No. 22. 




No. 26. 




No. 29. 




No. 32. 



No. 30. 



No. 19. 




No. 83. 




No. 27. 





No. 31. 






No. 24. 




No. 25. 




No. 28. 



•♦*?i?^5fi*r*« f^««e? ?. 



wa^r^KH 



p:%S«K^^'^ 



!»:«»-fe» - >y- xfi : 4i* ■'i* •!»« 



No. 33. No. 34. 

Nos. 18 to 35. — Five Fancy Designs, with Details. 



No. 35. 




TATTING AND NETTING 

■ 



103 





No. 37. 



No. 38. 





No. 39. 



No. 40. 



No. n, 



Nos. 36 TO 43.— Fancy Design, with 
Actual and Suggested Details. 






No. 41. 



No. 42. 



No. 43. 



In the second and subsequent rows the needle 
Ground of Geometrical Figures. has to pass twice under the ang)es that were first 

No. 44. — This pattern, quite different from fol- formed, in order that, over the whole surface, all 
lowing ones, consists of simple geometrical lines, the corners may be equally covered and connected. 

Ground Worked with Squares and Wheels. 

Nos. 45, 49 and 59. — A ground very often met 
with in old embroidered netting, consists of diag- 
onal lines of squares closely filled with darning 




No. 44.— Ground of Geometrical Figures. 



Fasten the thread to a knot of the netting, then 
carry it, always diagonally, under three other knots, 
and repeat this 3 times, after which, carry it once 
round the bar of the netting to fasten it, and back 
again to the knot which it has already encircled, and 
from thence begin a new square. Owing to your 
having always to bring the thread back to the knot 
whence the next square is to begin, you will have 4 
threads on two of the sides and 6 on the two others. 




No. 45. — Ground Worked with Wheels. 



stitches, alternating with diagonal lines of squares, 
each with a small wheel in the middle. 

In No. 59, the darning stitches and the wheels, 



104 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



which are both worked with the same material, 
each require 4 squares of the netting. 

Larger expanses of netting may also be entirely 
filled with wheels (No. 49). To make a really 




Ground Worked with Cross-Stitches (in 
One Size of Thread.) 

No. 48. — This pattern, similar to No. 50, consists 
of three diagonal rows of stitches, worked to and 
fro, with cross-stitches made over them. 

You may also begin with the cross-stitches in the 
fine thread, and work the triple stitches over them 
in the coarse. 

Ground Worked in two Sizes of Thread. 

No. 50. — Carry the coarse thread, from right to 
left, under the first knot of the netting, and then 
under the next, from left to right. This has to be 
done twice, to and fro, so that the squares of the 
netting are edged on both sides with a double layer 
of threads. 

When the whole foundation has been thus covered, 
take the fine thread and make loop stitches in the 
squares between the other rows of stitches, passing 
the needle for that purpose over the double stitch. 



No. 46. — Ground Worked with Darning and Cokd Stitches. 




No. 47. — Ground Worked in Darning and Loop 
Stitch. 

satisfactory grounding of this kind, you should be 
careful always to carry your thread over the bars 
of the netting and under the threads that are 
stretched diagonally across. 

Ground Worked with Darning and 
Cord Stitches. 
No. 46. — Patterns, executed chiefly in darning 
stitches, in a comparatively coarse thread, present 
a closer and heavier appearance than those we have 
been describing. Here, every other square of the 
netting is filled, as closely as possible, with stitches; 
the empty squares between are intersected diag- 
onally with cord threads. 

Ground Worked in Darning and Loop Stitch. 
No. 47. — The darning stitches are made in the 
coarse thread, over 4 squares of the netting, in a hori- 
zontal direction, with loop stitches in the fine thread 
made between them, over the same number of squares. 




No. 48. — Ground Worked with Cross-Stitches. 




No. 49. — Ground op Squares and Wheels. 

(For Description see Page 10S.) 

Lastly, intersect the loop stitches with straight 
threads, and pass the needle each time through 
the knot of the netting. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



105 



Ground with Wheels and Loop Stitch. 

No. 51. — Begin with the coarse thread and finish 
all the wheels first, making them over each 4 threads 
of the netting; then with the 
fine thread you make loop 
stitches between them. 

Fanck Ground (Worked 
in Stitchi s Placed One 

Above the Other.) 

No. 52. — Cover a whole 
row of squares with cross- 
stitches, and leave 3 rows of 
squares empty. When you 
have a sufficient Dumber of 
rows of cross-stitches, take 
a long needle and pass it 
upwards from below, and 
from right to left, under the 
two bars of the third upper 
square; then pass downwards 
to the first square of the 3 
bottom rows and under the 
bars from right to left, so as 

again to leave 3 squares between the fresh stitches. 
The next row of stitches is made in the same 
manner, so that the stitches are not only set con- 
trary ways, but reciprocally cover each other. 

Fancy Ground (Worked in Horizontal Lines.) 
No. 53. — Make half cross-stitches over 4 squares 



I. \ tt iced Ground. 

(For DliutnMloD ne Pag* 100.) 
No. 55. — Begin by running the thread to 
and fro, under two vertical bars and over three 




No. 50.- 



-Ground Worked in Two 

Sizes of Thread. 



No. 51. — Ground with Wheels and 
Loop Stitch. 




horizontal ones. When the ground is entirely 
covered, carry your thread from right to left, 
under the bars over which the first rows of 
thread are crossed; then take it over the long 
crosses, that correspond to 5 squares of netting, 
and pass it in the same line under the bars of 
the netting. In returning, the long stitches 
cross each other, over the stitches of the first row. 



Ground in Russian Stitch. 

(For Illustration see Page 106.) 

No. 56. — Pass the thread from 
left to right, under a bar of the 
netting, carry it downwards over 
4 squares, and pass it again, from 
left to right, under the bar, then 
upwards, again over 4 squares of 



No. 52. — Fancy Ground. 



No. 63. — Fancy Ground. 



of netting, by passing the thread alternately over 
and under 3 knots, and under 3 squares of the net- 
ting. In the 2nd row, cross the threads over those 
of the 1st row, as is shown in our engraving. 

Ground Worked in Cross and Darning Stitci:. 

No. 54. — You begin by making the close darn- 
ing stitches, and then proceed to the cross-stitches. 
To give them the right shape, finish all the rows of 
stitches one way first; in the subsequent rows that 
cross the first ones, you introduce the thread be- 
tween the stitches that are first crossed. 




netting, and so 
on. The stitches 
of the next rows 
are made in the 
same manner; 
you have only 
to see that the 
loops formed by 
the stitches all 
come on the same 

line of knots. This is a very handsome founda- 
tion for covering books, sofa-pillows, cushions or 
any fancy article of a kindred description. 



No. 54. — Ground Worked in Cross 
and Darning Stitch. 



106 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Ground of Embroidered Netting. 
No. 57. — Netting embroidered with two sizes of 




No. 55. — Latticed Ground. No. 56. — Ground in Russian Stitch. 

(For Descriptions of Nos. 55 and 56 see Page 105.) 



Ground Worked in two Sizes of Thread. 

No. 58. — These stitches, are copied in part from 
an old and most curious 
piece of embroidered net- 
ting. They may be worked 
with rope silk and embroid- 
ery silk, the former being 
used for the darning and 
the almond-shaped stitches 
between, and the latter for the 
button-hole stitches. When- 
ever two sizes of thread are 
used for one pattern, all the 
stitches in the coarse thread 
should be put in first, and 
those in the fine, last. The 
result of using two threads is 
almost invariably pleasing. 





"No. 57. — Ground of Embroidered Netting. 



thread possesses many advan- 
tages in the way of effectiveness, 
and also of durability; but it is 
only in a piece of work of a 
certain size that it is possible 
really to judge of the excellent 
effect produced by the use of 
two threads of different sizes. 
Small pieces are not advisable. 
The principal lines of the 
pattern shown at No. 57 are 
worked in a very coarse thread 
like rope silk, while the loop 
stitches are in finer size, say, 
wash embroidery silk. 





No. 58. — Ground Worked in Two 
Sizes of Thread. 



No. 59. — Ground of Squares and 
Wheels. — (For Description see Page 103.) 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



L07 



EDGINGS, INSERTIONS, FRINGES AND SCOLLOPS 



The designs in this department will lie found 
useful in decorating personal or household linen, or 
for trimming any of the dainty hits 
of lace or lawn used for hand- 
kerchiefs, doileys, mats, etc. 

Netted Scollop. 

No. i. — Make 12 stitches or 
loops over the foundation loop 
with a large bone needle ; then, 
still using the same mesh, make 

2 stitches in each of the loops 
just made. Next make 4 rows 
with a steel needle, then 1 row 
with the bone needle. Now make 
1 row of loose puffs, using the 
bone needle, working thus : Make 
1 plain stitch, then in the next 
loop make the puff as follows: 
Work the first stitch as usual, 
then pass the thread over the 

mesh and up through the stitch last worked in, 

3 times ; then pass the thread around the fingers 
as usual, and insert the needle between the 1st and 
2nd loops of the last row, instead of through the 
2nd loop; draw the knot as usual, and the puff will 
be formed. Make 1 plain stitch in the next loop, 1 
puff in the next, and so on across the row. Next, 
1 plain row with the bone needle, but leave the 3 
loose loops of the puff free (see picture); then 



in every loop. Next, make 1 row with the steel 
needle, and 2 rows with the bone needle; then, 1 





No. 1. -Netted Scollop. 



make another row of puffs like the first one; but 
have the puffs of this row come between the puffs 
in the other row. 

Next raw. — With the same mesh make 2 stitches 



No. 2— Netted Lace. 

row with the bone needle, and skip every other loop 
(see picture.) 

Netted Lace. 

No. 2. — Use crochet cotton or thread, and 
make 3 rows of plain netting over a rather small 
mesh, making it of the length desired for the 
trimming; then net n stitches, turn, and net 10 
stitches, leaving the last one unnetted, which nar- 
rows the work. Continue in this 
way until you have but 1 loop on 
the mesh, and your point is com- 
pleted. Begin the next point by 
tying the thread into the next 
stitch in the 3rd row, and make 
all the points in the same way. 
Draw out the foundation thread 
and crochet 1 s. c. in each loop to 
form the heading. The edging 
may be made of very fine or coarse 
thread, silk or Kensington twine, 
and is pretty for trimming under- 
wear, aprons or the edges of scarfs 
or throws. It may be made deeper 
by making the points larger, in 
which case you work more loops 
over the mesh in the first row of 
the point before turning back ; 
or, if a smaller point be desired, 
make fewer loops to begin the 
point. In washing and doing up 
this lace, the points must be pulled into place 
with the fingers before the iron is applied, espe- 
cially if much starch has been used. But little 
starch is advisable, however, for netted laces. 



108 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Vandyke Border. 

No. 3. — The foundation for this border is worked 
in the manner described for oblong netting (see 





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No. 3. — Vandyke Border. 

page 81.) Commence as usual, and increase at 
the end of every row till the width of the border, 
minus the scollop, is attained; then keep the upper 
edge straight, and increase at the end of every 
alternate row for the scollop. When brought to 
the requisite depth, omit netting 1 loop at the scol- 
lop end of every alternate row, and proceed in like 



Third row. — Work three stitches into one of pre- 
vious row, one stitch into each of two successive 
stitches. Repeat throughout the row. 

Fourth ro7t>. — Plain working through the clusters 
of three stitches together as one stitch. 

Fifth row. — Plain. 

Sixth row. — Like third row, working the clusters 
of three stitches between those of the third row. 

Seventh row. — Like fourth row. 

Eighth row. — Work two stitches together below 
the clusters of sixth row, work one into all the 
other stitches. 

Ninth row. — Work over a mesh rather more than 
half an inch in width, four stitches into one stitch 
of last row, pass over three stitches, and repeat. 

Tenth row. — With the mesh first used, work one 
stitch into each of the four worked into one stitch, 
take the next loop, pass it through the center of the 
three stitches passed over in the previous row, work 




No. 5. — Netted Insertion. 




No. 4. — Trimming, with Thick Loops and Fan Edge. 

manner for the length required. Afterwards darn 
the pattern as shown in the engraving. 

Trimming, with Thick Loops and Fan Edge. 
No. 4. — First work two rows of plain netting. 



one stitch into it. Repeat from the beginning of 
the row. 

The mode of passing the long loop through the 
center of the three stitches is clearly shown by the 
thin line in the design. 

Netted Insertion. 

No. 5. — Use a steel needle of medium size for 
the mesh, and make 5 rows. Then use a quarter- 
inch mesh and make 1 row; then use a coarse 
bone needle for the 3rd mesh, and make 1 row, 
putting your needle through 2 loops at once; then 
with the same mesh, make 1 row plain, putting 
1 stitch in every loop. Next use the quarter-inch 
mesh and put 2 stitches in every loop; then make 6 
rows with the mesh first used. 

This insertion is very pretty for making scarfs, 
with strips of the netting alternating with strips of 
ribbon. Very pretty tidies may be made of it; and 
it can be used for decorating underclothing, yokes, 
baby garments, center-pieces, scarfs, curtains, 
draperies, book covers, etc. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



109 



Netted Edging. 

No. 6. — Make as many Stitches over the founda- 
tion loop as the length of the work requires, using 
a large hone needle tor the mesh ; 
then with the same mesh, make 3 
rows more. Next make 4 rows with 
a coarse steel needle for a mesh, 
then make the fancy stripe thus: Use 
the large bone needle for a mesh, and 
work 1 row ; then, with the steel 
needle, work 1 row in the following 
way: Pass the thread over the fingers 
and mesh in the regular way; next 
pass the needle through the loop on 
the fingers as usual; then pass the 
1st loop through the 2nd, the 2nd 
through the 1st, and the 1st through 
the 2nd, and tie in the usual way; 



stitches left between the loops of the other row, so 
that the 2 In >ps o( netting cross each other. 

In the third row. the knots are again made first 
into the loops of the first row; then those in the 



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No. 6 — Netted Edging. 



workthrough 
the 2nd loop 
and then re- 
peat across 
the row. 

Nextmake 
3 rows with 
the steel 
mesh, and 2 
rows with the 
bone mesh ; 
then use the one-fourth inch mesh, and put 1 
stitch in the 1st loop, 6 in the next, and repeat. 
Leave the thread in at the upper edge until the lace 
is sewed on, being careful to sew through each 
loop of the edging. 

Netted Fringe. 

No. 7. — Plain netting, pretty as it is, looks rather 
simple unless ornamented with embroidery of some 
kind. The double netting here illustrated will 
prove a welcome novelty. The heading is worked 
in rope silk, thus: Make one row of netting leaving 
the loops close together on the foundation string; 
now make 1 row of s. c. through the loops of net- 
ting, then another row of netting through the s. c, 
and finish the top of the first row and bottom of 
one last made with a s. c. or chain stitch. 

To make the Double Netting. — Into every fourth 
of these chain stitches, net r loop, missing the 3 
between. At the end of the row, turn the work 
and make the knot in the middle one of the 3 chain 



mm 




If M 


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No. 7. — Netted Fringe. 



fourth row are worked into those of the second row. 
When the strip is sufficiently wide, finish it off 
with tassel fringe. Instead of tying up the lengths 
of silk with a thread twisted round them and fas- 
tened off with a stitch, make 2 looped knots round 
them with the end of the silk, where the neck of 
the tassel should come. 



Netted Trimming. 



No. 8.— Work 
knitting-needle. 



five rows of plain netting over a 
Work two patterns of star netting 




No. 8.— Netted Trimming. 

as described in Nos. 53 and 54 page 89. Work two 
plain rows. Work one row with a mesh half an 
inch wide, passing over one stitch of last row. For 
the last row, work over the large mesh into every 
stitch. A row of darning-stitch is worked in scol- 
lops at each edge of the star pattern. 



110 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Netted Scollop. 

No. 9. — This scollop is used for edging doileys, 
pillow-cases, underwear, etc., and may be of fine or 





No. 9. — Netted Scollop. 

of coarse thread. 
No. 36 thread 
was used in the 
sample given ; 
and 2 sizes of 
mesh sticks, one 
large and the 
other small, (or a 
coarse bone and 
asteel, needle) are 
also required. 

First row. — 
With the bone 
needle as the 
mesh, make 30 
stitches over the 
foundation loop. 

Second row. — Use the steel needle, and net 
1 stitch in each loop. 

Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth rows. — The 
same as last row. 

Seventh row. — One row, using the bone 
needle. 

Eighth roiv. — : Use the bone needle and 
work thus: 1 stitch into each of the first 2 
loops, then * 7 stitches in the next loop, 1 in 
each of the next 5, and repeat from *. 

Ninth row. — Use the steel needle, and 
work 1 stitch into each of the plain loops 
until you reach the group of 7; then * work 
through 3 of these at once, then through 1, 
then through 3 together, then net 1 stitch into 
each of the next 5 loops, and repeat from *. 

Tenth row. — Use the steel needle, and net 
plain. 

Eleventh row. — Use the steel needle, net 1 
stitch into each of the first 3 loops, * 3 stitches 
into the next loop, 1 stitch into each of the next 
6 loops, and repeat from *. 

Twelfth row. — Net 1 stitch in each loop until 
you reach the group of 3 (with the steel needle), * 



then through the 3 at once, 1 stitch into each of the 
next 6, and repeat from *. 

Thirteenth row. — Use the bone needle and work 
into every other stitch. Draw the foundation thread 
up, and tie to form the scollop. 



Design for Netted and Darned, 
or Guipure Lace. 

No. 10. — The specimen of netted, 
darned lace here shown is one of a 
number of designs given in this de- 
partment, and is introduced to show 
the method and ultimate beauty of 
the work. Edgings and insertions of 
this description are generally made 
of £cru linen thread, but colored or 
white crochet cotton may also be 
used, according to the purpose for 
which the decoration is intended. 

The method of darning is made 
very plain by the engraving, as is the 
button-holing 
which outlines 
the lower edge. 
The details of 
making a serrated 
edge are illus- 
trated on page 
100. The other 
specimens of net- 
ted and darned 
lace and articles 
given in follow- 
ing departments 
will require no 
separate descrip- 
tions, as the prin- 
ciples just re- 



10.— Design for Netted and Darned, or Gcipure Lace. 




No. 11. — Pointed, Netted Edging. 
corded govern their development and completion. 

Pointed, Netted Edging. 
No. 11. — This edging is very pretty when used for 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Ill 



trimming underwear; and the foundation tine. id 
over which it is worked may be left in to sew it on by. 

First use a rather coarse bone needle for the 
mesh, ami make as many stitches over the loop 
(which should be as long as die piece of 
trimming is desired), as required. Next, 
make 3 rows over a quite coarse steel needle, 
then 2 rows over a little liner bone needle. 

Now, with the steel needle make 1 plain 
row, then 1 row in which you put 2 stitches 
in each loop of preceding row. 

Next row. — Make 1 stitch in every other 
loop, that is, you leave the close loop un- 
worked. Next, make 1 row with the finer 
bone needle, then work the points thus: 
Use the steel needle and work in 5 loops; 
turn, and work back in the 5 loops, then 
work back and forth, leaving 1 loop at the 
end of each row, which you do not work in, 
until you have but 1 loop left ; break the 
thread, tie in the last loop of the first row 
of point, and proceed for the next point and 
all others, in the 
same way. A 
larger point may 
be made by work- 
ing into more 
loops in the first 
row. 



Netted Lace 
and Inser- 
tion. 

Nos. 13 AND 
14. — Three sizes 
of mesh sticks are 
used for the lace. 
Use the smallest 



needle through the first loop, then through the 
second, then pull the second through the first and 
the first through the second, and draw the thread 
in a knot as usual; then knot the second loop and 




No. 15. — Netted Edging. 



across 



T ii T \ 1 mTjtv V T \ 1 i( 1 \ Tx t y i ii T v T v T 



Xo. 12. — Guipure Edging. 

(For Suggestions see No. 10, Page 110.) 




No. 13.— XtTTKD Lack. 



NO. 14.— NETTED INSERTION 



one first, and net 6 rows plain; then use the thread 
double and make 1 row with the next size, then 2 
rows with the first one used and single thread, but 
in the first row work thus: Pass the thread over the 
mesh and fingers in the usual way; then pass the 



continue 
the row. 

Next row. — 

Use the same 

mesh, but use 

thethread double. 

Next row. — 

Use the largest 

mesh and double 

the thread; make 

S stitches in the 

first loop, then *, 

skip 1 loop and 

make 5 stitches 

in the next loop, 

and repeat from * 

for all the row. 

Next three rows. — Use the smallest 

mesh and double the thread; in the first 

row work in 4 loops, skip 1, and repeat; 

next row, work in 3 loops, skip 1, and 

repeat; tor the last row, work in 2 loops, 

skip 1, and repeat. As you work each 

row, the thread where the loop is skipped 

must be left a little longer when putting 

it over the mesh. 

The insertion shown at picture No. 4 
is made like the upper part of the lace 
(see picture). 

Netted Edging. 

No. 15. — Make 3 rows of plain net- 
ting. * Then, using a fine steel knitting 
needle for a mesh, work 3 stitches in the 
first loop; now wind your thread once 
round the mesh, and then make 3 stitches 
in the next loop; repeat from * until the end of the 
row. When you turn, you will find the turn has 
made a long stitch, which must be taken up by 3 
short stitches, and the turn again taken. Three 
more rows of the netting are worked in this way. 



112 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Next row. — Net plain, only taking up your long 
stitches. 

Next row. — Take up every alternate stitch. 




No. 16. — Netted Border, with Fringe. 



Next row. — Work 2 stitches in every alternate 
one. 

Netted Border, with Fringe. 

No. 16. — The border as here shown is made of 
very finely twisted cotton, but the German knitting 
cotton, rather fine, is better adapted to the pattern, 
especially when the border is 
used for finishing table-covers. 
Net as many stitches as the 
length of the strip requires, 
using a quarter-inch mesh, and 
make 5 rows. 

Next, take the cotton and 
work with 3 strands at once; 
make 1 row of this with a mesh 
' a very little smaller than the 
one just used, to make the loop 
smaller. Next, make 1 row 
with the quarter-inch mesh and 
single thread, but in this row 
twist the loop (see picture). 

Next, use a little larger mesh 
than the first one, and make 2 
loops; then make the puff thus: 
Make 1 stitch in the next loop, 
then pass the thread over the mesh and up through 
the loop just worked in, and continue this 9 times; 
then tie in the regular way, except that you do not 



put the thread over the mesh and into the next loop, 
but around the 9 loops, or between the cluster and 
the last single loop. Now make 2 more stitches, 
another puff , and continue in this way across the work. 
Next rmv. — Plain, with the quarter-inch mesh; 
then another row with the 3-threads, then 1 plain 
twisted row. The last 6 rows may be repeated, if a 
wider edge is desired. Cut strands of the fringe as 
long as desired, and knot or tie 5 in each loop. 

Edging in Double Fan or Sheaf "Design. 

No. 17. — This forms a pretty edging for doileys, 
night-nets, little caps or bonnets, or dainty gar- 
ments, etc. 

First to Third rows. — Plain netting over a 
quarter-inch mesh. 

Fourth row. — With a mesh an inch wide, and 
double cotton, work one stitch into each loop. 

Fifth row. — With the small mesh work one stitch 
into each loop. The long-stitches are caught to- 
gether in clusters of three by a needle and cotton; 
each stitch must be firmly fastened at the back and 
cut off. 

For the Heading. — Work one double crochet into 
a stitch, three chain, and repeat to the end of the 
row. 

Netted Fringe. 

No. 18. — This fringe may be worked with either 
wool or cotton. 

First row. — For the foundation, plain with a 
small mesh. 

Second row. — Over a three-quarter inch mesh, 
with double cotton or wool, 1 stitch into each loop. 

Third row. — Over a knitting-needle No. 13, net 
1 stitch into the 2nd loop, pass the 1st loop at the 
back of the 2nd, and net it. Repeat, crossing the 
loops in this way throughout the row. 

Fourth row. — Like second. 

Fifth row. — Net r loop into the 1st, pass over 
the 2nd, net into the 3rd, pass the 2nd at the back 
of 3rd and net it, continue to cross the loops to the 




No. 17. — Edging 
Sheaf 



in Double Fan or 
Design. 




No. 18. — Netted Fringe. 



end of the row. Netting the 1st stitch plain in 
alternate rows causes the crossed loops to come 
between those in the row of crossed loops above. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



113 



Sixth row. — Over a quarter-inch mesh net i into 
each loop of last row. Cut lengths of cotton or 
wool, and knot 8 strands into each loop of last row. 



Netted Edging. 
No. 21. — For this edging use 3 sizes of mesh- 



Border in Rose and Sheaf Pattern. 

No. 19. — First to Third roics. — With a knitting 
needle No. 1 1 for a mesh, work in plain netting. 

Fourth and Fifth rows. — Work in rose netting 
(see page 88). 

Sixth and Seventh rows. — Plain. 

Eighth roii'. — With treble cotton and a mesh 
rather more than an inch in width, work one stitch 
into each loop. 

Ninth to Eleventh roics. — With the small mesh 
and single cotton work one stitch into each loop. 

Twelfth roic. — Work this row in round netting 
(for which see illustration No. 55, page 90), with 
double cotton, one stitch into a loop, wrap cotton 
twice over the mesh, pass over one stitch, and repeat. 

The sheafs are caught together by crochet as 
follows: Work one d. c. over three triple loops, 
seven chain, repeat. A double length of cotton is 
darned in a straight line above and below the two 
rows of rose pattern, to produce an insertion effect. 

Tassel Fringe. 

No. 20. — Make a foundation with Berlin wool 
over a knitting needle No. 10. Work six plain rows. 

Seventh row. — Net one into each stitch with dou- 
ble wool over a mesh two inches in width, cut all 
the loops in the center, take two strands from each 
of two loops, bind them once round with silk of the 
same color as the wool, take three strands of wool 
two and a half inches in length, bind them in with 
the strands of the loop, fasten securely, and cut off. 

Now bind the tassel round about a quarter of an 
inch below the last binding, comb out the wool, and 




No. 21.— Netted Edging. 



sticks, one large, one somewhat smaller, and the 
third very fine. First use the middle-sized mesh, 
and net 7 rows, putting 1 stitch in each loop. 

Eighth row. — Use the large mesh, and put 4 
stitches in each loop. 

Ninth, Tenth and Eleventh rows. — Net plain, 
using the very fine mesh. 

Twelfth row. — Use the large mesh, and net 1 
stitch in each loop. 

Thirteetith row. — Use the 
middle-sized mesh, and work 
through all 3 loops on the hook 
at once. 

Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
rows. — Use the same mesh, and 
work through each loop. 

Sixteenth row. — Use the large 
mesh, and net 3 stitches into 
each loop. 

Seventeenth and Eighteenth 
rows. — Use the finest mesh, 
and work in every loop. 

Netted Scollop for 
Borders. 

(For IllaBtration eee Page 114.) 

No. 22. — Use Kensington 

twine in any dainty color, or 

any other material preferred, 

and select meshes in three sizes. 

cut the edges even for the tassel. This fringe is First net 12 stitches over the foundation-loop 

pretty for finishing draperies, mats, upholstery or with the medium-sized mesh for the beginning of 

any fancy vqprk requiring a fringe-finish. the scollop; then net 1 plain row; next, net 2 

8 





No. 19 —Border rv Rose and Sheaf Pattern. No. 20. — Tassel Fringe. 



114 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



stitches into every loop; then, still using the same 
mesh, net 5 more rows, putting 1 stitch in each loop. 







i^::^^^^^" 


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71/ M HA 




\f. 







No. 22. — Netted Scollop for Borders. 
(For Description see Page 113.) 



the trimming calls for; then net 3 more plain rows. 
Fifth row. — Net the 2nd loop, then the 1st, and 
repeat. 

Sixth and Seventh rows. — 
Net plain. 

Eighth and Ninth rows. — 
Net 2 stitches in every loop. 

Tenth row. — Net plain. 

Eleventh row. — Net 
through 2 loops at once. 

Twelfth row. — Skip every 
other loop. 

Some practice will be 
necessary in acquiring suffi- 
cient skill to make perfect 
netting, but when it is ac- 
quired the netter will be able 
to produce some of the pret- 
tiest fancy-work she has ever 
undertaken, for the single 
threads which form the foun- 
dation design of all netting 







/v\ 



AAA AA- 



No. 23. — Guipure Insertion. 
(For Snggestions for Nob. 23 and 25, eee No. 10, Page 110.) 



No. 24. — Netted Edging. 



Now take the largest mesh and 
net 3 stitches into every loop, then 
finish with the smallest mesh by 
putting 1 stitch in each. Draw up 
the foundation-thread and tie in a 
firm knot to form the half-wheel, or 
scollop. Make a row of single cro- 
chets across the top, to form a firm 
edge for sewing on. Silk forms a 
pretty scollop of this kind for bor- 
ders to tidies, throws, scarfs, etc. 
Linen or cotton scollops are pretty 
for decorating table linen or other 
cotton or linen household articles. 

Netted Edging. 




No. 25.- -Guipure Edging. 



No. 24. — Use a bone knitting 
needle of medium size for the mesh. Net over the lend a delicacy to the result not seen in any of 
foundation loop as many stitches as the length of the other varieties of fancy or ornar#ental work. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



115 



This design, made of fine linen thread or cotton needle put 2 stitches in every loop. Next make 
would form .1 dainty edge for a scarf-end, a fancy 4 rows with a steel needle, then 1 row with the 
tie, or a fine fichu. 

Netted Edging. 

No. 26.— With a 
large bone needle for 
the mesh, make 5 
rows plain, then use a 
coarser mesh and work 
2 rows thus: Make 1 
stitch through the 2nd 
loop, then through the 
1st, and so continue 
across the row. Next 
make 3 rows with the 
first mesh. Crochet a 
slip stitch in every loop 
across the upper row. 

Netted Pointed 
Lace. 

No. 28. — Make 21 




No. 28. — Netted Pointed Lace. 





No. 2G. — Netted Edging. 



No. 29.— Guipdre Edging. 



• .'• .'■ ftV •*« •*« ft** «.*• ft*. •'• »'• •*■ •*• .*• «*• •'. ••"•-• **. •'• •*« •"• •'• .'ft >*• m ft ft*ft .'«- •'• • •»>•'••• 




• •*«.■, *>• •'« •'• ft • ft ■ • ft • ft ft ft ft'ft ♦*• •> ■'• •'• •*« •*• •'• ft ft •** • « » t ft ft • * •'• •*• » '« •*• • « ••»'-• ft ft •'• 



. 1.I.IJ I I U I U J J — L..J, I 1 ,1 LL 



.1.1 iill.it 



No. 27. — Gcipbre Insertion. 
(For Suggestions for Nos. 27 and 29, see No. 10, Page 110.) 

stitches over the foundation loop with a bone 
needle, then in the next row with a finer bone 



bone one. Next row, with the same mesh, 
work 2 loops together each time ; in the 
next row with the same mesh, make 2 
stitches in every loop. Next make 1 row 
with the steel needle, then make the points 
by working back and forth, beginning with 
6 loops; then in all of the remaining rows 
leave the last loop in each row unworked 
until the point is worked down to r loop; 
break the thread, tie in the first row of last 
point, and repeat for the remaining points. 
If at the end there are only 5 loops for the 
last point, make an extra stitch in the last 
loop when working first row. Draw up to 
form the scollop, tie tightly, then break the 
thread; work across the top to make a firm 
sewing-on edge in single crochet or slip stitches. 



116 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Netted Border, with Fringe. 

No. 30. — This border is made of German knit- 
ting cotton, 
which is used 
double. Make 
8 rows over 
a coarse bone 
needle ; then, 
with the thread 
doubled again, 
use a wider 
mesh and 
make 1 row 
plain. Next, 
make 3 rows 
with the 1st 
mesh, but twist 
each stitch. 
Then make 
another row 
with the wide 
mesh, then 3 
more with the 




No. 30. — Netted Border, with Fringe. 

narrow mesh ; cut some of the 
cotton into the lengths desired for 
the fringe, and tie 8 strands into 
each loop. Crochet a cord and 
run it through the top row of 
loops. Kensington cord, silk or 
any preferred material may be 
used for this border. 

Netted Lace. 
No. 31. — This lace, as here pic- 



decoration of household or personal linen, or for 
trimming fancy articles for the bureau or toilet table. 
Make 12 stitches with a rather coarse bone needle, 
on the foundation loop, then, with a little smaller 
needle, make 2 stitches in every loop. Next, make 3 
rows with a rather coarse steel needle, then 1 row 
with the bone needle, but in every other stitch put the 
thread over the mesh twice. Next row, use the quar- 
ter-inch mesh, and make 1 in every stitch; then make 
1 row with the largest bone needle, and make 2 stitches 
in every loop. Draw up the work with the foun- 
dation thread to form the scollop, and tie it tightly. 

Netted Edging. 

No. 32. — Use two sizes of coarse, steel knitting- 
needles for the mesh-sticks. 

First row. — Use the largest mesh, and net 12 
stitches over the foundation loop. 

Second row. — Use the same mesh and net 1 stitch 
in each loop. 

Third row. — Net 2 stitches in each loop, thus 
making 24 loops. 

Fourth row. — Net 1 stitch in each loop. 




No. 31. — Netted Lace. 




No. 32. — Netted Edging. 



tured, is made of knitting silk, but if desired it 
may be made of cotton or linen thread for the 



Fifth row. — Use the smaller mesh and begin by 
simply turning the thread once around the mesh; 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



117 



then make 2 stitches in the next loop; this, when 
slipped off the mesh, will make 1 long stitch and 2 
short ones; re- 
peat this for 
the whole 
length of the 
row. 

Sixth rem'. — 
Work the same 
as last row, 
but work 
through the 
long loops 
only. 

Seventh row. 
— Net plain, 
working 
through the 
long loops. 

Eighth row. 
— Net plain, 
making one in 
every loop. 

Draw up the 
foundation 
thread and tie No. 34 

firmly to form 
the scollop ; 
then make s. 

c. across the upper edge to make it firm for sewing 
on by. 

Design for Netted Guipure Insertion. 

No. 33. — Net a strip as long as desired, and 
12 meshes wide. Then darn in the design seen 



Intersecting threads may be knotted in to vary the 
effect of the pattern. This kind of insertion, with 





No. 33. — Design fob Netted Guipure Insertion 



in the engraving (or any other design preferred) 
in the same manner that you darn drawn-work. 



-Netted Guipure Lace. 



an edging to match, is very popular for decorating 
curtains of scrim or muslin. 

Netted Guipure Lace. 

No. 34. — Net the foundation over a mesh- 
stick of medium 
size and of the 
width desired, work- 
ing diagonally 
across, and narrow- 
ing and widening 
as necessary to 
make the points. 
The darning pattern 
seen in the engrav- 
ing, or any other pre- 
ferred may be used. 
The lace is pretty 
for trimming cur- 
tains, lambrequins 
and table and bed 
linen, and should 
be made of linen 
thread, bleached or 
unbleached. 

When the founda- 
tion is netted, baste 
it into a frame. In 
this way the darning 
may be more easily 
and evenly done. 
The work may be 
nicely stiffened by pressing it under a cloth wet 
in borax water and wrung nearly dry. 



118 



TATTING AND NETTING. 










Ifl^^M^fii-. 



No. 35. 



No. 39. 





No. 36. 



No. 40. 




No. 37. 




No. 38. 

Nos. 35 to 41. — Designs in Darned or Guipure Netting 

(For Suggestions for Nos. 35 to 41, See No. 10, Page 110.) 




TATTING AND NETTING. 



119 



DoileVs, toilet sets, aats, Wheels, squares, etc. 



Like knitting and tatting, netting depends largely 
for effect upon the texture and size of the material 
from which it is made. Very fine cotton or linen 
produces the best results for toilet articles; coarser 




this a vine is feather-stitched. Linen lawn is 
prettiest for the centers; and when the work is 
completed, it may be made fresh and smooth by 
wetting a cloth in borax water, wringing it quite 

dry, placing it over 
the wrong side of 
the lawn and press- 
ing with a hot iron. 
The cloth must be 
damp enough to 
communicate suffi- 
cient moisture to 
the linen to erase 
the wrinkles. 

Cracker Doily. 

(No Illustration.) 

Cut the linen used 
for the center in a 
circle 7 inches in 
diameter, and hem 
it narrowly ; then 
make double cro- 
chets with 1 chain 
between, round the 
edge. Use Coats' 
No. 20 cotton, a 
rather coarse mesh 



Nos. 1 and 2. — Bureau Toilrt-Set. 



(nearly 



nch), 



crochet cotton is better for doileys and dining-table 
mats, etc., while silk or wool is best for articles of 
wear, such as shawls, capes, fascinators, etc., all 
of which may be designed by anyone who has 
learned to net. 

Bureau Toilet-Set. 

Nos. 1 and 2. — This is a very dainty toilet-set, 
and yet it is easily made. The set consists of five 
pieces — the large center mat seen at No. 1, and 
four smaller mats like the one seen at No. 2. The 
sizes of these articles must depend upon the size of 
the bureau or dressing-case they are to ornament. 
In the set illustrated the large mat is about five- 
eighths of a yard long and twelve inches wide, and 
the small mats are about eight inches in diameter. 
Each is very narrowly hemmed, and then a row of 
double crochets of pale-blue crochet silk are made 
around it over the hem. Then the netting is begun, 
one loop being made in every space made by the 
crochets. Six rows of plain netting complete the 
border of each mat. A plain row of feather- 
stitching is made with the silk around the center 
just where the crochets are inserted, and inside of 




No. 2. 



and net two 
stitches in 
every space 
formed by 
the i-chain; 
then make 5 
more rows of 
the netting, 
putting 1 
stitch in every 
loop; this 
gives the de- 
sired fulness. 
Stiffen the 

netting with borax water, and as it dries pull it 
into the position necessary to give a fluted effect. 

The cracker jar or dish is placed upon this doily, 
which lends a daintiness to the general effect that 
is very pleasing. A large doily of this description 
may be used under a cracked-ice bowl, a salad dish, 
a fruit basket or platter, or a bowl or shallow dish 
filled with flowers. Tiny ones may hold finger- 
bowls, bonbon dishes, or trays of olives or salted 
almonds, thus lending greater daintiness to the 
usual service of the modern table. 



120 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Finger-Bowl Doily, with Netted Border. 

No. 3. — The doily illustrated by this engraving 
is made of linen lawn and netting. 

Make the center three and a half inches in 
diameter, hem narrowly, and use No. 20 Coats' 
cotton for the border. Use 3 sizes of mesh-sticks 
— the largest one quarter inch, one just a trifle 
smaller, and another about the size of a rather 
coarse steel knitting-needle. Net 137 stitches over 
the foundation loop (which should be large enough 
to encircle the center); turn the work back and 
with the same mesh net 1 stitch in the first 



Ninth round. — Use the smallest mesh and make 
1 stitch in every loop; cut the thread. Do not 
break the string on which the netting is made until 
the netting is sewed to the center. Take the linen 
and fold it in 4 quarters, and also quarter the 
netting; put each quarter of the netting to the 
quartered center, having the netting on top; take a 
stitch in the linen, then slip the needle through the 
knot on the foundation string, then another stitch 
in the linen, and so on until it is all sewed on; then 
cut the foundation thread and pull it out. This 
completes the mat. 

To make larger or smaller mats, cast on more or 




No. 3. — Finger-bowl Doily, with Netted Border. 



mesh, and 2 in the next; then repeat across. (If 
you work around in this row, the first stitches will 
slip.) Now be very careful that the work is not 
twisted on the foundation loop, and join the 2 ends; 
then work round and round with the smallest mesh 
until you have 4 rows. 

Sixth round. — Use the largest mesh and make 1 
stitch in every loop. 

Seventh round. — Use the medium-sized mesh and 
work through 3 loops at once, for the entire round. 

Eighth round. — Use the largest mesh and put 6 
stitches in the first loop, 1 in the next, and repeat 
to end of round. 



less stitches in beginning, and cut the center accord- 
ingly. The design given for this doily would be 
exceedingly pretty worked out in pale-blue, pale- 
pink, lavender, reseda, or yellow silk in a set of 
bureau mats. 

Doily, with Netted Border and Embroid- 
ered Center. 

(For Illustration pee Page 121.) 

No. 4. — The center of this pretty doily is made 
of fine linen. It was cut 4 inches in diameter and 
narrowly hemmed, after which a row of double 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



121 



crochets a little less than an eighth of an inch 
apart was worked round it over the htm. Then 
with a small mesh the netting 
was begun, one loop being 
worked into every space be- 
tween the crochets. Seven or 
eight rows of netting form a 
border of pretty width. 

Tiny sprays of flowers and 
foliage are embroidered in 
natural colors on the linen cen- 
ter with silk floss, with a decid- 
edly pretty effect. 

Doileys may be used for a 
variety of purposes. Single 
ones are pretty when placed on 
a bureau or under vases, jars, 
fancy boxes, etc., while in sets 
they are attractive accompani- 
ments for finger-bowls. 

Netted Tumbler Doily. 

No. 5. — In making this doily 
use a large mesh-stick, another 
half as large, and two very 
much smaller, the smallest one 
being as large as a medium- 
sized steel knitting-needle. 
Make 23 stitches over the foun- 
dation loop, using the largest 



form the circle, tying it firmly; then continue to 
net round and round. Next use the same mesh, but 




No. 5. — Netted Tumbler Doily. 




No. 4. — Doilt, with Netted Border and Embroidered Center 
(For Description ece Page 120.) 



mesh; then make 5 rows over the next size, but 
after making the 2nd row draw up the loop to 



net 2 stitches in each loop ; tnen, 
still using the same mesh, net 2 
stitches in 1 loop, 1 in the next, 
and repeat. Then use the next to 
the smallest mesh, and make 2 
rounds, putting 1 stitch in each 
loop. Now use the largest mesh and 
net 3 stitches in each loop; then use 
the next smaller mesh and net 3 
rounds, putting 1 stitch in each loop 
in every round. Next use the small- 
est mesh and net 5 stitches, then 
skip 1 loop and repeat. In the next 
round you net 4 stitches, then skip 
1 loop leaving the thread a little 
longer, and repeat. Continue net- 
ting, making 1 stitch less between 
the loops skipped, and also leaving 
the thread a little longer over the 
skipped loop, until there is only 1 
loop between the long stitches; then 
break the thread. If the largest 
mesh is not obtainable, the same 
result may be reached by putting 
the thread once entirely around the 
smaller mesh in netting each stitch; 
then when the loops are slipped off 

the mesh they will be as long as they would be if 

they were made over a large mesh. 



122 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Platter Doily, with Netted Border. 
No. 6. — The doily illustrated is made of hand- 



Now with a small mesh-stick work i row, crossing 
the row of meshes first made as follows: 

Knot the second mesh first; then the first mesh; 




No. 6. — Platter Doily, with Netted Border. 



some table linen, and is finished with 
a border of netting, which is also 
darned. The hem is feather-stitched. 
If preferred, the border may be simply 
netted and the darning omitted. 

Doileys of this kind are made in 
several sizes for the various platters 
used upon the dining-table, and may be 
round, oval, square or diamond-shaped, 
as preferred. 

Netted Border for Platter 
Doily. 

Nos. 7 and 8. — As this edging is 
netted into the hem of the doily de- 
scribed, the latter must first be cut, 
hemmed and feather-stitched. 

Then, in the manner represented by 
No. 7, knot enough meshes into the 
hem to make the 24 points seen in the 
picture. Each point has 13 meshes at 
its top. This will make 312 meshes which should 
be securely knotted into the edge of the doily. 




No. 1. — Detail of Netted Border for Platter Doily. 



then the fourth and then the third, and so on 
until you have worked entirely around the doily. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



123 



Then make another row with the small mesh- 
stick; then a row with the larger stick, and then 2 
rows with the smaller stick to complete the rows. 



the end of each row turn the work and go back to 
the opposite side where you leave one mesh un- 
knotted each time. Work in this manner to the tip 




No. 8. — Netted Border for Platter Doily. 
(For Description see Page I'M.) 













MM 










■■■' *$£'W i . 


^1 W^: 


P 



No. 9. — Table-Mat or Center-Piece, witu Netted, Fluted Edge. 



Now, with the same stick, begin the points, using 
13 meshes for each and working it separately. At 



of the point; fasten and break 
the thread and begin the next 
point. 

The solid pattern is simply 
darned in with linen floss. 

Table-Mat or Center-Piece, 
with Netted, Fluted Edge. 

No. 9. — Cut the circle for 
this mat from linen, making it 
15 inches in diameter, and finish 
it with a narrow hem. Then 
make double crochets with 1 ch. 
between around the edge, taking 
each stitch through the depth of 
the hem. Use coarse cotton 
(about No. 10 Coats'), and net 
2 stitches into every space made 
by the crochets; then make 8 
more rows of the netting. 
Stiffen the netting with borax 
water and pull it into flutings 
or ruchings as represented in 
This mat will be found a very orna- 
mental setting for an ice-dish or for a floral piece. 



the picture. 



124 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Netted Mat. 



stitches round the 
circle, and net 40 
No. 10. — This mat is made of blue single zephyr, making two into 




bone knitting needle. Tie in a 
stitches round the steel needle, 
each one of the preceding row. 
Now make one plain row 
round the steel needle, /. e., 
a stitch into each stitch of 
last row ; one plain row 
round the bone needle; two 
plain rows round the steel 
needle; one stitch over the 
bone needle into 1st of last 
circle, * 8 stitches into 2nd 
of last circle, 4 stitches into 
next 4 of last circle; repeat 
from *. 

One plain stitch over the 
bone needle into 1st of last 
circle; * 1 plain stitch into 
half the 8 stitches (4 loops), 
1 plain stitch into the other 
half, 4 plain stitches, repeat 
from *. One plain row over 
the steel needle. This fin- 
ishes the circle. 

Wheels of this kind t are 
very pretty done in fine cro- 
chet silk, and form a hand- 
some substitute for crocheted 
wheels. Done in ecru cot- 
ton, and arranged in a point 
at the end of a scrim bu- 
reau-scarf or throw, they 
are very pretty and effective. 
An edge of single crochets, or 
of single crochets and picots 
could be worked into the 



No. 10. — Netted Mat. 

and the figures in the points are darned in with 
white. Use a medium-sized mesh and another 
somewhat finer. Make 34 stitches over the foun- 
dation loop, using the large mesh; draw the 
foundation thread up and tie to form a circle; 
then continue by working round and round. 
Make 5 rounds with the fine mesh, then use the 
large mesh, and put 4 stitches in every other loop; 
but in 2 of the loops put 5 stitches, so as to make 
70 loops in all. Next use the fine mesh and net 5 
rows, putting 1 stitch in each loop; then make the 
points, of which there should be 7, thus: Work 
along 10 loops; turn, and work back in these loops, 
leaving the last one unworked; and continue in this 
way until there is but 1 loop, which will complete 
the point. Tie the worsted in the next loop, and 
make all the points in the same way. Darn in the 
figures in the points as shown in the picture. 

Netted Wheel, for Decorating Scarfs. 

No. 11. — Use a fine steel netting needle, and No. 
36 spool thread. For mesh-sticks use a coarse steel 
knitting needle, and a medium-sized bone one. 

Fill the netting needle. Tie into a loop of thread, 
which should be pinned to the knee. Net 20 




No. 11.— Netted Wheel, for Decorating Scarfs. 

last row of netting in the wheel with a good effect. 
Such wheels may also be appliqu^ed on to scarfs. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



125 



Netted Mat. 

No. 12. — The mat from which this engraving was 
made is of almost cobweb fineness, and would be 
very pretty as a cover to a round toilet-cushion of 
some delicate shade of satin. Use quite fine cro- 
chet cotton for this mat and a large and small mesh. 
Mike 20 stitches over the foundation loop with the 
large mesh, and draw up the thread and tie tightly 
to form a circle; then make 4 rows with the small 
mesh. Next use the large mesh, and make 3 stitches 
in every mesh; then 4 more rows with the small 
mesh, another row with the large mesh, putting 4 



with the small mesh; next, make r row with the 
large mesh, working in every loop, then 1 row with 
the same mesh, working through 4 loops at once, 
then another row with the same mesh, putting 4 
stitches in every loop. Now make 1 row with the 
small mesh, putting 1 stitch in each loop. For the 
last row use the small mesh, but skip every other 
loop, and let the thread be a little loose around the 
mesh. 

Platter Doily, with Netted Border. 

(For Illustration see Page 126.) 

No. 13. — The doily illustrated is made of fine 




No 12. — Netted Mat. 



stitches in each mesh; then 4 rows with the fine 
mesh, putting 1 stitch in every loop. Next make 1 
row with the large mesh, working through 4 loops 
at a time; then make 4 rows with the small mesh 
thus: put the thread over the needle twice to form 
a double stitch in the first loop, then make 3 single 
knots (thread over once) in the same loop, and re- 
peat this in all the loops in the next row. The 
double knots will pull out to make long loops, and 
work the same in these as in the last row, thus leav- 
ing the 3 single knots loose. Work the next 2 rows 
in the same way. Now make 1 row with the large 
mesh, putting 4 stitches in each loop, then 4 rows 



table linen and finished with a border of netted 
scollops and a row of feather-stitching. A fine 
hem is made all around the edge, and then the 
scollops are lapped as seen in the engraving, and 
sewed on by an over-and-over stitch. The feather- 
stitching is done last. Platter or table doileys may- 
be made of any size desired, the scollops in each 
instance being made of proportionate size. 

Detail for Border of Platter Doily. 

(For Illustration nee Page 126.) 

No. 14. — With a small mesh-stick and fine cro- 



126 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



chet cotton, cast up 34 meshes over a piece of the 
cotton. This piece of cotton is tied closely, when 



mesh-stick make 4 rows of netting, always turning 
the work at the end of each row. Then take the 




No. 13.— Platter Doily, with Netted Border. 
(For Description see Page 125.) 




No. 14.— Detail for Border op Platter Doily. 
(For Description see Page 125.) 



the netting is finished, to draw the work into larger stick and make 1 row of netting; turn. Then 
a scollop. Turn the work, and with a very fine over the smaller stick make 4 rows of netting. Tie 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



127 



the foundation cotton tightly 
lop. Having made a sufficien 
lap them as seen at 
No. 14, and sew them 
to the doily as seen at 
No. 13. 

Netted Finger- 
Bowl Doily. 

No. 15. — Net 32 
stitches over the foun- 
dation loop thus: Net 
1 plain, thread around 
the mesh only once, 
net 1 stitch in the next 
loop, and repeat for 
all the row. 

A T ext row. — Net 
plain; there will be 1 
long and 1 short stitch. 
Net so that all are in a 
line with the long 
stitches. At the end 
of this row draw up 
the center and tie 
tightly to form a circle, 
and then continue 
round and round, re- 
peating the last 2 rows 
twice more; but at the 
end of each round tie 
in the first loop of next 
round by putting the 



to complete the scol- stitch just the same length as the loop in last round, 
t number of scollops, Next to the last round. — Net 6 stitches in the 





No. 16. — Netted Mat. 



first loop, putting 
mesh once before 
then r plain stitch 
repeat. 

Last round. — Net 



the thread over the 

making each stitch, 

in the next loop, and 



1 stitch in every loop, 
letting the one in the short loop draw up a 
little, so as to form the scollop effect. Use 
a coarse bone needle for this mesh. Only 
one size is required. 

Netted Mat. 

No. 16. — Use Coats' No. 20 cotton for 
this mat, and 2 meshes — one quite large 
and one small. Use the large mesh first, 
and over the foundation-loop make 33 
stitches; draw up the foundation thread 
and tie to form a circle. Next work 
round the mat, and using the small mesh, 
make 4 rows; with the large mesh, make 1 
row and put 3 stitches into every loop of 
preceding row. Now make 6 rows with the 
small mesh, then 1 row with the large 
mesh the same as before. Next make 
thread over the mesh as usual, but before draw- 5 rows with the small mesh; then begin the points 
ing up the stitch slip the mesh out and draw the by working into 19 loops; turn and work back and 



No. 15. — Netted Fixger-Bowl Doii.y. 



128 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



forth, leaving the last loop unworked in each row, 
until the point is completed. Skip 2 loops and tie 



again, and work back having u loops on the mesh 
this time, and 1 unworked loop at the end; continue 

in this way until there is 
but 1 loop on the mesh, 
and then cut the thread. 
Leaving the 1 loop un- 
worked in each row nar- 
rows it. Begin the next 
point by tying the thread 
in the 2nd loop from the 
last point made, and work 
back and forth in the 
same way; make the re- 
maining points in a simi- 
lar manner. Should there 
be too many loops, say 2 
or 3, narrow by working 
through 2 at once ; if 
there are not enough, 
widen by netting 2 stitches 
in one loop. 

Darn the squares in 
the points as seen in the 
picture, thus : Darn a 
square in the 2nd loop 
from the edge, skip 1 loop 
and darn 1 in the next 
one, then darn 1 in the 
3rd row and 2 in the next 
row (see picture); this 
completes the square. 

For a smaller doily of 
this kind, begin with 
fewer stitches and use 
finer mesh-sticks. 

A set of doileys or mats 
No. 11. — Plate Doily, with Netted Border. 




the thread in the next one to begin the next point, 
and so continue until all the points are completed. 
There are 13 points in the mat pictured. 

Plate Doily, With Netted Border. 

No. 17. — Use 3 sizes of mesh-sticks. Make the 
center of the doily of linen and about 7 inches in 
diameter. Net 237 stitches over a foundation loop 
with the largest mesh. 

Second row. — Use the smallest mesh, and work 1 
row; then join the two ends and work 2 rounds 
with the same mesh. 

Fifth round. — Use the largest mesh, and make 1 
loop in each loop. 

Sixth round. — Use the medium-sized mesh, and 
work through 3 loops at once. 

Seventh row. — Use the largest mesh, and put 3 
stitches in each loop. 

Eighth and Ninth rounds. — Use the smallest 
mesh. The ninth row should contain 238 loops. 

Tenth round. — In this round the points, of which 
there are 17, are begun with the same mesh. At 
the end of the ninth round turn the work, and work 
back until there are 12 loops on the mesh, then turn 



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No. 18.— Square in Guipure or Darned Net. 

(For Suggestions see No. 10, Page 110.) 

of this description is an attractive addition to the 
dinner, breakfast or luncheon table. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



129 



Plate Doily, with Netted Border. 

No. 20. — For this doily cut the linen center 7 
inches in diam- 
eter, and hem 
narrowly. Use 
3 sizes of mesh 
sticks (one- 
fourth and one- 
sixteenth of an 
inch wide, and 
a medium-sized 
knitting needle 
for the smallest 
mesh.) Net 263 
stitches over the 
foundation loop, 
using the largest 
mesh. 

Second rcnv. — 
Use the smallest 
mesh, and work 
back 1 row; then 
being careful that 
the work is not 
twisted on the 
foundation loop, 
join the 2 ends 
and work 2 
rounds with the 
same mesh. 

Fifth round. — 
Use the largest 
mesh, and net 1 
stitch in each 
loop. 

Sixth round. — 



Seventh round. — Use the largest mesh, and put 3 
stitches in each loop. 

Eighth round. — Use the smallest mesh, and net 3 




MO. 20. — Plate Doily, with Netted Border. 
























No. 19.— Square Df Parkino and Applique ox Netting. 
(No Description.) 

Next use the medium-sized mesh, and work 
through all 3 loops at once, for the entire round. 
9 



rounds, netting r stitch in each loop of the row. 

Eleventh round. — Use the largest mesh, and net 1 
in each loop. 

Twelfth round. — Use the medium-sized mesh, 
and work through 3 loops at once. 

Thirteenth round. — Use the largest mesh, net 6 
stitches in the first loop, 1 in the next, and repeat 
for the entire round. 

Fourteenth round. — Use the smallest mesh, and 
net 1 in every loop. Sew to the center the same as 
directed for the finger-bowl doily. 

Netted Square. 

(For Illustration see Page 130.) 

No. 21. — This scpaare consists of a foundation of 
plain netting (begun at one corner) handsomely 
darned in the same manner that drawn-work is 
darned. The border is button-holed, and the net- 
ting is cut away from it on the outside when it is 
completed, in order to form the pointed edge. On 
page ioo will be seen the method of button-holing 
an edge. No description of details will be necessary. 



130 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Section for Netted Square. 



are needed to make the square as large as required; 
work back and forth, narrowing at each side until 
No. 22. — Four sections like the one illustrated a single stitch remains. Next darn the section in 





No. 21. — Netted Square. 
(For Description see Page 129.) 




No. 23. — Corner of a Square in Guipure or Darned Netting. 

(For Suggestions for No. 23, see No. 10 Page 110.) 



at No. 22 may be joined to form a square. Begin any pattern desired in case the one here illustrated 
with as many stitches over the foundation loop as is not in keeping with individual taste. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



131 




No. 26.— Border in Darned Nettisg. No. 28.— Corner a Octpure Netting. 

(For Suggestions for Nop. 24, 25, 26, 27 and 28. see No. :0 on Pago lin ) 



132 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



To Stiffen and Press Netting. 

It is essential that doileys or mats of netting, 
when made of cotton or linen, should be pressed 
and ' often stiffened, otherwise the work is apt to 
appear flimsy and fails to disclose its beauty. When 



dry and stiffen it. Mats may also be stiffened by 
dampening with starch water. When there is a 
linen center, and renovation is necessary, wash and 
starch the doily, pull the netting into shape, and 
iron until dry. 

When netting is made in ruche form around the 



ria^n (&rro rhttsi 




No. 29. — Square in Guipure or Darned Netting. 
(No Description. For Suggestions See No. 10, Page 110.) 





No. 30. No. 31. 

NOS. 30 AND 31. — DEAILS OF BORDER OF SQUARE ABOVE ILLUSTRATED. 



a doily or mat is completed, spread it carefully upon 
a clean, soft white cloth; wring another cloth, not 
too dryly, out of borax water, place it over the doily 
and press with a hot iron. The steam from the wet 
cloth will dampen the doily, and the hot iron will 



edge of a doily, it should be starched and pulled 
into fluting with the fingers when nearly dry. It 
may be best, or advisable, to slightly smooth it with 
the iron before forming the fluting described. The 
fluting should form an upright border. 



TATTING AND NETTING 



138 



ARTICLES OF USE AND O^NAAENT. 



Netted Scare or Throw. 

No. i. — It may interest our patrons to know that 
the scarf represented below, was made by a young 
lady who is totally devoid of sight, and that the 
work was, therefore, carried out entirely by the 
sense of touch. Owing to the peculiar texture of 
the material used 
in making it, the 
artist was unable 
to perfectly rep- 
resent the work, 
which is very 
evenly done, all 
the points and 
pyramids at the 
lower edges being 
uniform. In silk 
or in a soft thread 
which does not 
twist, the scarf 
would be very 
pretty indeed, 
the design being 
showy but not 
difficult. 

Use 3 sizes of 
mesh-sticks and 
make the center 
first. Begin with 
the smallest 
mesh, and make 
38 stitches over 
the foundation- 
loop, and then 
make 78 plain 
rows like the first 
one. 

Now, for the 
fancy end, make 
2 rows with 
the middle-sized 
mesh; then use 
the largest mesh 
and make 3 
stitches in every 
loop. Then make 

2 rows with the 
small mesh, 1 
stitch in every 
loop. Now make 

1 row plain with the largest mesh, then with the 
middle-sized mesh make 1 stitch through every 

3 loops; then 1 row plain with the same mesh. 
Next use the largest mesh and make 3 stitches in 
every loop, then 2 rows plain with the smallest mesh, 
putting 1 stitch in every loop. Next 1 row with 




the largest mesh, then use the middle-sized mesh 
and make 1 stitch through every 3 loops; 1 row 
plain with the same mesh, then another row with 
the large mesh, putting 3 stitches in every loop, then 
2 plain rows with the small mesh; then with the 
same mesh make the pyramid thus: Net 3 stitches, 
skip 1, * net 5 stitches, skip 1, and repeat from star 

across the row to 
the end, where 
you net 3 plain. 
Next row. — 
Net 2 stitches, 
skip i, * make 
the thread over 
the mesh a little 
longer, then net 
4 plain, skip 1, 
and repeat from 

* to end of row. 
Next row. — 

Net 2 stitches, 
make the thread 
a little longer, 
skip 1, * net 3 
stitches, skip 1 
and repeat from 

* across the row. 
Next row. — 

Net 1, * skip 1, 
make the thread 
a little longer, 
net 2, and repeat 
from *. 

Next row. — ■ 
Net 1, * skip 1, 
make the thread 
a little longer, 
net 1 and repeat 
from *. In mak- 
ing the first row 
of pyramids, if 
the stitches are a 
little short in 
number, make 
one or more by 
putting two in 
one, and if there 
are too many 
stitches for the 
pattern, narrow 
by working two 
Make the other end to correspond. 



So. 1, — Netted Scarf or Throw. 



loops together. 



No. 



Ni 1 iii) Fascinator. 

(For Illustration Bee Page 134.) 

2. — This is a pretty, light covering to be 



134 



TA" 



ING AND NETTING. 



worn on the head as represented in our engraving, 
or to be used as a handkerchief for the neck. 
Procure 4 ozs. of salmon pink Berlin wool, a small 
steel mesh, and 3 flat meshes, measuring respectively 




No. 2.— Netted Fascinator (Mat be Used as a Fichu.) 

(For Description see Page 133.) 

a quarter-inch, a half-inch, and three-quarters of an 
inch. Begin for the straight side of the fascinator 
with 45 stitches worked on a foundation with the 
quarter-inch mesh. Continue on the same mesh, 
working all plain netting, and reduce by taking 2 
loops together at the end of every row till a three- 
cornered piece of work is produced, ending with 1 
stitch only; this is the center of the fascinator. 

For the Border; First round. — Take the half- 
inch mesh, and net 2 stitches in every loop round 
the three sides of the fascinator. 

Second round. — With quarter-inch mesh, net 1 
stitch in every loop along the sides and increase 2 
or 3 stitches at each corner. 

Third round. — With three-quarter inch mesh, net 
2 stitches in every loop of last round. 

Fourth round. — With quarter-inch mesh, take up 
2 loops together and net as 1 stitch. 

Fifth round. — With three-quarter inch mesh, net 
8 stitches in the 1st loop of last round, wool over 
the mesh, and pass the needle from left to right 
through the 2 next loops, and repeat. 

Sixth round. — With the small steel mesh, net 1 
stitch in each loop of the scollop of 8 loops, net 1 
stitch in the loop formed by the passing of the 
needle, and repeat. 

Seventh round. — With same mesh, plain netting. 
This completes the fascinator, 



Work-Bag with Netted Cover. 

No. 3. — This original looking bag is made of a red 
silk handkerchief lined with Swiss cambric. Before 
cutting it out the handkerchief is to be folded the 
shape of a triangle; the two middle ends are then 
rounded off, thus giving the bottom of the bag. A 
cover netted with cord finishes the outside. The 
cover is begun with 23 stitches; 15 rows are 
then netted with the same number of stitches, and 
in the next 7 rows, 1 stitch is to be increased at the 
end of every row; the 22nd row has now 30 stitches, 
and 10 rows the same width then follow, reaching 
as far as the middle of the net; from here the net- 
ting is decreased in the same proportion as it was 
increased in the first half. The net is then fastened 
on the wooden rods where the bag opens. Each of 
these is 7^ inches long and 1% inch thick, and 
ornamented at the end with a flat metal button. 
On these rods the stitches in the first and last rows 
of netting are fastened with cord by catching up 
each stitch twice, and wrapping the cord around the 
rod in doing it. The stitches are then slipped close 
together into a space of 3^ inches. Dark red 
ribbon $% inches wide folded three times, and thick 
gold cord are next put through the edge stitches on 
both sides of the net. A yard and a half of olive 
green ribbon and about five-eighths of a yard of gold 
cord will be required. The ends of the ribbon go 
over the rods, while the gold cord, is put through 
two holes bored in the rods and each is finished with 
a knot sewn firmly below these. (See picture.) The 
cord going over the rods serves to hold the ribbon 




No. 3. — Work-Bag with Netted Cover. 

strap which is put on with small bows. After the 
silk bag and the cover are tacked together at 
the outer edges, pompons of wool the color of the 
bag and ribbon are added to complete the bag. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



L85 



Corner of a Netted Shawl. 

No. 4. — Saxon) was used for this shawl. Use 
3 different sizes ot mesh-sticks. Make the cen- 
ter, which is square, over the middle-sized mesh. 
An easy way of making the square is to begin with 
2 stitches, and widen at the end of each row until 
the work is of the dimensions required; then nar- 



row plain, except at each corner, where you put 2 
Stitches in each of the 3 corner-loops. 

Next row. — Use the smallest mesh, and put 2 
stitches in every other loop. 

Next row. — For the open stripe use the largest 
mesh and make 1 row plain, putting 1 stitch in 
every loop. 

Next two rows. — Use the middle-sized mesh, but 
in the first row work through 3 loops 
at once; work the next row plain. 

Next rmv. — Use the largest mesh, 
and make 3 stitches in every loop, 
except at each corner, where you put 
4 stitches in each of the 4 loops. 
Then make 4 rows with the smallest 
mesh, putting 1 stitch in every loop. 
Next row. — Use the largest mesh, 
and make 1 row plain; then use 
the middle-sized mesh for the next 
2 rows, but in the first tow work 
through 2 loops at once. 




No. 4. — Corner of a Netted Shawl. 



row in the same proportion until the square is com- 
pleted. 

For the border use the same mesh and make 4 
rows, but in the first row make 2 stitches in every 
long loop, where the widening comes along the edge 
of f he square, so that the 4 rows will not draw, and 
at the corners they will widen enough to make them 
lie perfectly flatly. 

Next row. — Use the largest mesh, and make 1 



Next roiv. — Use the largest mesh, * make 7 
stitches in the first loop, skip 1 loop, make 1 stitch 
in the next one, skip 1 loop, and repeat from * 
around the work. Next make 4 rows with the 
finest mesh, putting 1 stitch in every loop of the 
first row, except at each corner, where you put 2 
stitches in each of the 3 loops between 2 groups of 
7. Cut fringe the desired length, and knot 1 strand 
in every loop. 



136 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Netted Mouchoir or Photograph Case. 

No. 5. — Use satin or any desired color for the 
lining of the case, and Glasco lace thread for the 




directions in reverse order. At each end make 6 
or 7 rows with the bone needle, making 2 stitches 
in every loop in the first row; then 1 in each loop 
in the remaining rows. This forms the full por- 
tion, which is to be stiff- 
ened with borax water 
and fluted with the fingers. 
Fit the outside over the 
inside, fold the inside to- 
gether so that the ends 
meet over the center, -and 
sew it over and over along 
the sides ; then sew the 
outside together across 
the sides separately from 
the inside, first having 
sewed the ends having the 
fluted ruffle to the inside. 
Make bows of ribbon and 
arrange at each end (see 
picture). 

Netted Border for 
Handkerchief. 



No. 5 — Netted Mocchoir or Photograph Case. 



netting, although knitting silk may be used, if pre- 
ferred. 

Make the lining or inside of the case a quarter 
of a yard wide, and thirteen inches and a 
half long. Two pieces of this size will be 
required, and a layer of sheet wadding is 
placed between them. 

For the Outside. — First make 50 stitches 
over the foundation loop, with a coarse 
bone needle for the mesh, and then net 5 
rows with the same mesh. Next make 3 
rows with a coarse steel needle, then 1 
fancy stripe thus: 

Use a ^-inch mesh and make 1 row 
plain; then with the bone mesh pass the 
thread over the mesh and fingers in the 
regular way: then pass the needle through 
the loop on the finger as usual, through the 
first loop, then through the second; draw 
the second through the first, then the first 
through the second, and tie in the cus- 
tomary manner. Next, work through the 
second loop, and repeat this movement 
across the row. Make 2 more plain rows 
with the bone needle; then another fancy 
stripe made thus: 

One row with the ^-inch mesh; next 
use the bone needle and work through 2 
loops at once; 1 row with the same mesh 
plain; then with the ^-inch mesh make 2 
stitches in every loop. Next make 7 rows 
with the bone needle, then make another 
fancy stripe like the first one, 6 rows plain with 
the bone needle, then another fancy stripe like 
the second one; this brings you to the center. 
Work the other half to correspond, following the 



No. 6. — This lace forms 

a handsome finish for a 

handkerchief with open 

drawn-work border. 

Three mesh sticks were used in its construction: 

First, a piece of thin steel, one-eighth of an inch 

wide. Second, bone, one-fourth of an inch wide. 




No. 6. — Netted Border for Handkerchief. 

Third, steel, bone or wood, slightly wider than the 
second. 

With the smallest mesh make 4 rows. With the 
second size, 1 row. Then, with the largest size 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



187 



make i row putting the needle through 3 loops at 
once, except at the corners where it is put through 
but 2 loops. Now, with the second size, make 1 
row of netting with 3 stitches in each loop except at 
the corners, where several extra stitches are re- 
quired. Then with the smallest mesh make 4 rows, 
1 stitch in each mesh. If, as in the present instance, 
the lace be made separate, make a double row of 
meshes of sufficient length for one side and insert a 
cord. Then proceed to the other sides. Allow one 
mesh for each one-eighth inch with 6 or 8 extra 
ones for the corners. For example: If the handker- 
chief is 11 inches square, about 96 stitches will be 
needed for each side. This double row is equal to 
three rows, as will be perceived when the lace is 
completed. If the lace be made on the article, the 
knots of the first row should be drawn very close to 
the material, and a very fine netting needle used. 

Netted Tie. 

No. 7. — Use a small mesh-stick, and make 22 
stitches over the foundation-loop; then, with the 
same mesh, make 170 rows, which form the body 
of the tie. 

For the Border. — Take a wider mesh and use a 
double thread, and net plain, except at the corners, 
where you make 3 stitches in each of the 3 loops. 

Second roio. — Use the same mesh and double 
thread; net 3 loops (or 6 threads) together, and add 
2 more stitches in the same loop, that is, up through 



Fourth row. — Net plain with the same mesh. 
The tie which results from these directions may 
be made as long as desired — long enough to pass 




No. 7.— Netted Tie. 

the middle of the group, except at the corners, 
which you net plain. 

Third row. — Use the small mesh, and net plain, 
putting a stitch in every loop that may be formed 
by separating the double thread. 




No. 8. — Netted Night-Cap. 

around the neck and tie, or, as represented, just 
long enough to make the loop, knot and ends. 

Netted Nightcap. 

No. 8. — This is a light cap, netted with knitting 
cotton No. 8, and meshes of two sizes. Commence 
with the larger mesh, putting on 28 stitches; 
through these run a double thread of cotton, and 
unite in a circle. Then with the smaller mesh do 
3 rounds of plain netting. 

Fifth round. — With the larger mesh, net 3 stitches 
in every loop of last round. Net 3 plain rounds 
with the smaller mesh. 

Ninth round. — With the larger mesh, net 2 stitches 
in every loop of last round. 

Tenth round.— With the smaller mesh, take up the 
3 first loops together, and net them as 1 stitch, net 1 
stitch in the next loop, and repeat to the end of the 
round. Net 2 plain rounds with the same mesh. 

Thirteent/i aw///:/.— With the larger mesh, net 1 
stitch in each loop all round; in this round a tape 
is afterwards to be run to tie in a bow at the back. 
Now with the smaller mesh, net a stitch in each 
loop, but leave 20 loops unworked at the end of 
the round, and turn, and net back; this gives 64 
stitches for the front of the cap; with the same 
mesh net another row. Then work the same as the 



138 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



9th, 10th, nth and 12th rows, and repeat these 4 
rows; net also 2 more plain rows with the small 
mesh, and 1 plain row with the large mesh ; in 
this last row a tape is to be run. 

For the Border: First round. — With larger mesh, 
net 2 stitches in each loop all round the cap, 
excepting at the corners and in the long mesh loops 




No. 9. — Netted Shoulder Cape 

at the turning of the rows, where make 3 stitches. 

Second and Third rounds. — With smaller mesh, 
net 1 stitch in each loop of last round. 

Fourth round. — Net 1 loop, miss 1 loop, and 
repeat. A double border is worked along the front 
of the cap; (his begins with a row of stitches worked 
upon the smaller mesh into the third plain row 
before the first border; the netting of the first 
border is then here repeated. Finish with the 
strings. 

Netted Shoulder Cape. 

No. 9. — These capes are very light and elegant 
in appearance. Our model is netted with black 
silk braid of 2 widths — chain braid, and one-fourth 
inch wide braid. Four meshes are used, measuring 
respectively a quarter-inch, a half-inch, one and a 
half inches, and 2 inches in width. 

First row. — With the narrow braid and quarter- 
inch mesh, commence at the neck with 46 stitches. 
Net 2 plain rows. 

Fourth row. — With the same mesh and braid, net 
2 stitches in the first loop, 1 stitch in the next 
loop, and repeat the same to the end of the row. 



Fifth row. — With wide braid, net plain the 3 
first and the 3 last stitches upon quarter-inch mesh, 
and all the other stitches on the one and a half inch 
mesh. Net 3 plain rows with the narrow braid and 
smallest mesh. 

Ninth row. — With the same mesh and braid, net 

2 stitches in the first loop, 1 stitch in the next loop, 
and repeat. Net 2 plain rows with the same. 

Twelfth row. — With wide braid, plain netting, the 

3 first and the 3 last stitches upon quarter-inch mesh; 
the other stitches on one and a half inch mesh. 

Thirteenth row. — With narrow braid and small 
mesh, increase 1 stitch in every alternate loop. Net 

4 plain rows with the same mesh and braid. 
Eighteenth row. — With narrow braid and one and 

a half inch mesh, net 1 stitch in every loop. 

Nineteenth row. — With same braid. and half-inch 
mesh, net 2 loops together all along the row. 

Twentieth row. — With the same mesh and braid, 
plain netting. 

Twenty-first roiv. — With one and a half inch 
mesh, work 2 stitches into each of the 6 successive 
loops, then 3 stitches into each of 24 loops, then 2 
stitches into each loop until 30 loops from the end, 
when net 3 stitches into each of 24 successive loops, 
and 2 stitches into each of 6 remaining loops. Net 
4 plain rows with same braid and small mesh. 

Twenty-sixth row. — With wide braid, net plain, 
the 3 first and the 3 last stitches upon quarter-inch 




No. 10. — Netted Mitt.. 
(For Description see Page 139.) 

mesh, and all the other stitches on the one and a 
half inch mesh. 

Twenty-seventh row. — With narrow braid and 
small mesh, plain netting. 

Twenty-eighth row. — With wide braid and one and 
a half inch mesh (except the 3 first and 3 last 
stitches which net with the small mesh), work 36 
stitches plain, then take 2 together 12 times, then 1 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



1 89 



stitch into every loop till 60 from the end, when 
work to correspond with the beginnii 

Twenty-ninth row. — With narrow braid and small 
mesh, plain netting. 

Thirtieth row. — With wide braid, plain netting, 
3 first and 3 last stitches upon quarter-inch mesh 
and the other stitches on one and a half inch mesh. 

Thirty-first row. — With narrow braid and the 
small mesh, plain netting 

Thirty-secondtrow. — With wide braid and one and 
a half inch mesh (except the 3 first and 3 last 
stitches which do with the small mesh), net 1 stitch 
into every loop for 42 stitches, then take 2 loops 
together, 3 plain, 2 together, 3 plain, 2 together, 3 
plain, 2 together, then 1 stitch in each loop until 59 
loops from the end, when take 2 loops together, 3 
plain, 2 together, 3 plain, 2 together, 3 plain, 2 
together, 42 plain. Net 3 plain rows with narrow 
braid and the small mesh. 

Thirty-sixth row. — With the same braid and one 
and a half inch mesh, plain netting. Net 2 plain 
rows with narrow braid and the small mesh. 

Thirty-ninth row. — Plain, with one and a half 
inch mesh, net 4 plain rows with narrow braid and 
the small mesh. 

Forty-fourth roii 1 . — With narrow braid and the 2- 
inch mesh, net 2 stitches into 6 successive loops, 1 
stitch in the next loop, and repeat. 

Forty-fifth row. — Plain netting on the quarter- 
inch mesh. 

Forh-sixth row. — Plain netting on the one and a 
half inch mesh. 

Forty-seventh rmv. — Plain netting on the quarter- 
inch mesh. 

Forty-eighth row. — With the same mesh, net 1 
stitch in each alternate loop. This is sufficient 
depth for the cape. 

For the Collar. — Join on narrow braid at neck. 

First roii'. — With one and a half inch mesh, work 
2 stitches into every loop. 

Second row. — With the same braid and quarter- 
inch mesh, net 2 loops together all along. 

Third row. — With the same, plain netting. 

Fourth row. — With same braid and the one and 
a half inch mesh, work 2 stitches into each loop, 
but take 2 loops together about 6 times towards the 
middle to shape it. 

Fifth roic. — With the same, net 3 loops together 
twice at the beginning and end of the row, and 2 
loops together at intervals throughout the center. 

Sixth row. — With the same braid and the small 
mesh, net 1 stitch in every alternate loop. Run a 
ribbon round the neck and tie in a bow in front. 

Netted Mitt. 

(For Illustration s.ee Pa^e 138.) 

No. io. — To make these mittens, procure some 
machine silk of the size desired, a fine steel netting 
needle, and 2 steel knitting needles, No. 10 and 
No. 7 to use for meshes. Commence for the top of 
the hand with mesh No. 19, putting 40 stitches on 
a foundation, and join round. 

Second round. — Plain netting, but pass the silk 
twice round the mesh to every stitch. 



Third round. — Net 2 plain stitches with the silk 
twice round the mesh, silk twice round the mesh 
and net into the 3rd loop, and net 2 more stitches 
here with the silk once round the mesh, then the 
silk twice round the mesh and net into the 4th loop 
and do 2 more stitches here with the silk once round 
the mesh, and repeat 2 plain stitches and 2 looped 
stitches alternately to the end of the round. Work 
6 more rounds in the same manner, only in each 
round let the "loops" (/. e., the 3 stitches into one 
loop of preceding round), go, as it were, on the 
slant, 1 stitch beyond the loops of previous round. 

Tenth round. — With No. 7 mesh, plain netting. 

Eleventh round. — Draw the first loop of previous 
round upwards through the 2nd loop of the same 
round and net a stitch in it, then draw up the 2nd 
loop through the little opening under the knot and 
net a stitch in it, and entwine every 2 loops together 
in this manner to the end of the round; these 2 
rounds form a pattern of Grecian netting. Now 
repeat the 7 rounds of looped netting. When this 
is done put 16 stitches on to a new foundation for 
the beginning of the thumb, join round, and work 
the same as the first 9 rows of the hand part. Join 
the thumb to the mitten by netting 4 loops of each 
together on the inside of the mitten. Do the 2 
rounds of Grecian netting. Repeat the 7 rounds 
of looped netting, decreasing twice in each round 
by taking two loops together on each side of the 
thumb. Do the two rounds of Grecian netting. 
Repeat the 7 rounds of looped netting now decreas- 
ing once in each round in the inside of the hand. 
Do the 2 rounds of Grecian netting. Again work 
the 7 rounds of looped netting, this time with no 
decreasing whatever. Do the 2 rounds of Grecian 
netting. Repeat the 7 rounds of looped netting, 
and in the last 2 of these increase 3 stitches in each 
round. Do the 2 rounds of Grecian netting. Do 2 
rounds of plain netting on the small mesh, passing 
the silk twice round the mesh to every stitch. 

For the Border: First round. — With No. 7 mesh, 
net 3 stitches into each loop. 

Second round. — With No. 19 mesh, pass the silk 
twice round the mesh and take up 3 loops of last 
row together on the needle and net them as 1 stitch, 
and continue same to the end of the round. Repeat 
these 2 rounds twice. 

Seventh and Eighth rounds. — Plain netting on small 
mesh, passing silk twice round themesh toeverystitch. 

Ninth round. — With No. 7 mesh, miss the first 
loop, net 6 stitches in the next, miss the next, net 1 
stitch in the next, and continue thus alternately 
doing 6 stitches and 1 stitch in every other loop. 
Work 2 plain rounds on small mesh, and fasten off. 

For the Border at the top of the Mitten an I round 
the Thumb: First round. — With No. 7 mesh, net 2 
stitches into each loop. 

Second round. — With No. 19 mesh, pass silk twice 
round the mesh and take up 2 loops of last round 
together on the needle and net them as 1 stitch. 

Third round. — Plain netting on the small mesh 
passing the silk twice round the mesh to each stitch. 

Finish with 3 rounds same as the last 3 of 
the wrist. Net the other mitten to correspond. 



140 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Netted Shawl. knitting needle No. 14; any number of rows may 

be worked. 
No. 11. — This very dainty shawl is made of pale- For the Border: — First row. — Work two stitches in 




blue 
Saxony. 
Three sizes 
of raesh- 
sticks are used, 
the same as in the 
corner of shawl se 
at No. 4, page 
Make the square tl 
as directed for tl 
mentioned, and al: 
first 5 rows of th 



th 



«fe 






same manner. Next make the open 

stripe by the same directions ; then 

4 rounds with the smallest mesh, then another open 

stripe; next 3 rounds with the smallest mesh, and 

then use the largest mesh and make 1 round plain; 

then use the middle-sized mesh and make 1 round, 

working through 3 loops at once. 

Next round. — Make 6 stitches in 1 loop, 1 in the 
next, and repeat for the entire round; then use the 
smallest mesh and make 1 stitch in every loop. 

Directions for Netting a Seine. 

(No Illustration.) 

Make a foundation loop. Begin at the left, hold- 
ing the mesh-stick in the left hand, the needle in 
the right. Throw the thread over the mesh-stick. 
To form a mesh, pass the thread over and under 
the third finger, catch the thread under the thumb, 
and back under and over the little finger, through 
the loop made on the third finger, bringing the 
needle up under the mesh-stick, through the mesh. 
Let all loops off, except the one on the little finger, 
until the mesh is formed on the mesh-stick, loosen- 
ing the loop on the little finger last. Draw up 
tightly, to form the knot. 

Next row. — Slip the meshes off the mesh-stick, 
and turn work over and work as before. 

Design for Antimacassars, Fichus, 
Darned Netting, etc. 

No. 12. — The foundation is netted plain over a 



Netted ^ 



each 
loop of 
foundation 
over a quar- 
ter-inch mesh. 
Second row. — 
Over the small mesh 
work one stitch 
through the second 
stitch worked into one 
loop of last row, and into 
the next loop together, so that 
the double loop always slants to 
the right. 
Third row. — Plain. 

Fourth row. — One stitch over the large mesh into 
a stitch of last row, pass over one stitch, six stitches 
into the next, pass over one stitch and repeat. 

Fifth row. — One stitch over the large mesh into 
each stitch of last 
row. 

Sixth row. — 
With the small 
mesh work into 
each loop of last 
row, twisting the 
long loops as de- 
scribed elsewhere 
in these pages. 
The pattern is 
darned in the 
foundation with 
soft knitting cot- 
ton. 

Bread -T ray 
Cover. 

(For Illustration see 
Page 141. j 




No. 12. — Design fob Antimacassars 
Fichus, Darned Netting, Etc. 



No. 13. — This 
cover is worked 
with crochet cot- 
ton No. 8, and a medium size knitting needle for one 
mesh, also a mesh one-half inch wide; a skein of 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



141 



knitting cotton No. 12 is required for darning the Third round. — With half-inch mesh, i stitch in 

pattern on the oblong netted center. With crochet each loop. 

cotton and smallest mesh work 2 stitches on to the Fourth round. — With half-inch mesh, net 1 stitrh 




No. 13. — Bread-Tray Cover. 
(For Description see Page 140.) 



foundation or into 1 loop of the piece of netting 
which serves as a foundation; turn the work, and pro- 
ceed as directed for oblong netting, till 29 stitches 
are attained; then decrease at the end of the next 
row by taking 2 loops together, and increase at 

the end of the next 
row, and continue 
thus decreasing on one 
side and increasing 
on the other, till you 
can count 49 squares 
straight along the 
edge ; after this take 
two loops together at 
the end of every row, 
and so reduce to 2 
stitches only, and fas- 
ten off. 

For the Border: 
First rou nd. — \\'ith the 
same cotton and mesh, 
net 1 stitch in each 
square all round the 
piece of netting with 6 
stitches to full round 
each corner. 

Second round. — W i th 
in each loop of last 



JL 



*Mm?M 







No. 14. — Plum Basket. 



the same 
round. 



mesh, 1 stitch 



in the 2nd loop, 1 stitch in the 1st loop, 1 in the 
4th, 1 in the 3rd, and so on, crossing the loops all 
round. Net 2 rounds plain with the smaller mesh, 
increasing a stitch or two at the comers if needed. 

Seventh round. — Same as the 3rd round. 

Eighth round. — Same as the 4th round. Net 2 
plain rounds with the smaller mesh. 

Eleventh round. — With half-inch mesh, net 5 
stitches in one loop, cotton round the mesh, miss 3 
loops, and repeat; miss only 1 loop at the corners. 

Twelfth round. — With smaller mesh, net 1 stitch 
in each loop of last round, and draw up the long 
thread through the center loop of the 3 missed (and 
through the 1 missed at the corners), and net r in 
it, and repeat. 

Thirteenth round. — With same mesh, plain netting 
all round, and fasten off. Take the knitting cotton 
and a long darning needle, and darn upon the center 
piece of oblong netting the pattern as shown in the 
engraving. 

Plum Basket. 

No. 14. — Although this receptacle is called a plum 
basket it may be used for other fruit as well. It 
will be found convenient in gathering and carrying 
fruit of all descriptions. Made of strong cord it 
becomes a convenient vegetable bag. In fact its 
many uses will suggest themselves to the observer 
without our assistance. It is simply a circular net- 



14:2 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



ted section widened only now and then in order„to 
obtain the size required at the top and yet preserve 
the bag effect. The hoop at the top may be of 
wood or metal as preferred or convenient, and the 




No. 15. — Oriental Pattern for Long Window Curtains. 

handle made of strong cord or tape, or formed of a 
strap worked in single crochet. 

Oriental Pattern for Long Window 
Curtains. 

No. 15. — Use knitting cotton No. 8, and meshes of 



two sizes. With the smaller mesh, commence with 
as many stitches as will suffice for the length of the 
curtain, and work 3 plain rows. 

Fourth row. — With larger mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each loop of last row. 

Fifth row. — With smaller mesh, draw the 1st loop 
through the 2nd loop and net it, then draw the 2nd 
loop through the 1st and net it, and continue in the 
same manner to the end of the row. Net 2 plain 
rows. Repeat from the 4th row. 

Twelfth row. — With double cotton and larger 
mesh, net 1 stitch in each loop. 

Thirteenth roaej. — With the same cotton and mesh, 




No. 16. — Design for Short, Darned Window Curtain. 

take up every 3 loops, and net them as 1 stitch. 

Fourteenth row. — With same, plain netting. 

Fifteenth roio. — With same, work 3 stitches in 
each loop of last row. 

Sixteenth row. — With single cotton and smaller 
mesh, work 1 stitch in each loop. 

Seventeenth row. — With same, plain netting. 

Repeat the pattern from the 4th row for the 
width required. Then when wide enough make the 
4th row and the 5th row, and on this work for the 
border. 

For the Border: First row. — With a flat half-inch 
wide mesh, net 3 stitches in each alternate loop. 

Second and Third rows. — With smaller mesh, net 
1 stitch in each loop. 

Fourth row. — With larger mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each alternate loop. This completes the curtain. 

Design for Short, Darned Window Curtain. 

No. 16. — Use knitting cotton No. 8, and a flat 
bone mesh a quarter-inch in width. Commence as 
usual, a stitch at the end of every row till you have 
produced the width required for the curtain, then 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



1 i:; 




decrease by taking up 2 loops together on the 
shortest side of the netting, and still increase on 
the longest side, these two operations taking place 
at the end of alternate rows, so that you retain the 
same number of stitches on the mesh till the netting 
is the length required, when decrease at the end of 
every row to shape 
the corner. Then 
having the foun- 
dation finished, 
stretch it out, 
dampen and iron it 
if necessary, and 
proceed to darn 
the pattern. 

\ i 1TF.D Cover 

for Bonbon 

Dish. 

Nos. 17 and 18. 
— These two en- 
gravings show a 
very pretty article 

for table use. No. 17 shows it when in use, and No. 
18 as it appears when finished and before it is 
arranged. The netting is done with mesh-sticks 
of two sizes, and the points are made precisely like 
those of doily borders. The size of the cover must 
depend upon that of the dish it is to conceal. The 
points may be increased or diminished in number 
to make the cover larger or smaller, but a point 
itself should not be divided. 

The cover can be used as a bonbon bag by draw- 
ing it together at the straight edge, and running a 
tasseled cord or a narrow ribbon through the large 
meshes next the points for a drawing string. 

Lamp-shades can be netted on the same plan, 
and covers for vases, albums and mouchoir-ca.ses 
and for fan and opera-glass bags may also be 
developed from the idea here presented. 

Directions for Making Netted Curtains. 

1 No Illustration.) 

Silk or rococo yarn may be used for making these 
curtains. Use two sizes of mesh-sticks, large and 
small, or flat sticks one-half and one-fourth of an 
inch wide. If preferred, larger meshes may be used. 
The foundation for a curtain four yards in length 
requires 576 stitches. Begin with the half-inch 
mesh, and net 4 rows plain; then for the open stripe 
work thus: 

Fifth row. — Plain, using the half-inch mesh, 

Sixth /-rT.\ — Use the smaller mesh, and net 
through 2 loops at once, repeating across the row. 

Seventh row. — Net plain, using the same mesh. 

Eighth row. — Use the larger mesh, and net 2 
stitches in each loop across the row; this forms 
the open stripe. 

For the Diamond Stripe. — Use the small mesh, 
and net 4 rows plain. 

Fifth rote. — Net 1 plain stitch, then pass the 
thread around the mesh only; then net 1 regular 
stitch in the next loop, and repeat this across the 



No. 11. — Netted Coves for Bonbon Dish. (Arranged.) 



row; when the work is slipped off the mesh there 
will be 1 long loop and 1 short one. 

Sixth raw. — Net plain, holding the mesh so that 
it will be on a line with the long loops. 

Seventh row. — Like the 5th, but begin by putting 
the thread around the mesh instead of beginning 

with the plain 
stitch. 

Eighth row. — 
Like sixth row. 
Then repeat the 
last 4 rows (in- 
cluding the eighth) 
5 times more; 
next work three 
rows plain, all to 
be worked with the 
small mesh. Next 
work another open 
stripe; thenastripe 
which is to be em- 
broidered. 

For the Em- 
broidered Stripe. — Use the one-fourth inch mesh, 
and net 36 plain rows; next repeat the open stripe, 
then the diamond stripe, and then the open stripe 
again. Now make another stripe to be embroidered. 
Use the small mesh, but net 39 rows plain; then 
repeat the open stripe, diamond stripe and open 
stripe each again. 




No. 18. — Netted Cover for Bonbon Dish. (Unfolded.! 

Third Embroidered Stripe. — Net same as first 
embroidered stripe; then repeat the open stripe, and 
net 4 rows plain; this makes a curtain one yard wide. 

To make the Edge for the Curtain. — Use the large 
mesh, and net 17 stitches in the last row of the 
curtain; turn and net 1 stitch in each of the 17 loops 
just made; then turn again, and work in 16 loops, 



144 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



leaving the last one free; continue in this way, 
working back and forth, leaving i loop free at the 
end of each row, until there is but i loop on the 




No. 19. — Infant's Netted Cap. 

mesh, and the point is completed; then cut the 
thread. Begin the next point in the next or 18th 
loop. Repeat the points along one side and the 
bottom of the curtain. 

The fancy stripes are embroidered in ordinary 
leaves, palm 
leaves or any 
chosen design, 
with the same 
kind of yarn or 
silk as that 
used for the 
curtains; a rug 
needle is used 
in darning 
them. The 
embroidery is 
done by pass- 
ing the needle 
over and un- 
der the stitch- 
es of the net- 
t in g. Em- 
broider the 
points in the 
same way. 

Infant's 
Netted Cap. 

No. 19. — 
This cap is 
made of Glas- 
co lace thread. 
Net 100 stitch- 
es into the foundation loop, using a coarse bone 
needle for a mesh stick; make 5 rows plain, then 



6 rows with a coarse steel needle. Next use the 
bone needle and make 1 stitch plain, then 3 in 
the next loop, and repeat across the row. Next 
use a quarter-inch mesh and make 1 stitch plain, 
then 1 through the group of 3, and repeat. Next 
row, use the bone needle and work through 2 each 
time. Next row, plain with bone needle; then use 
the quarter-inch mesh, and work 2 stitches in every 
loop. Next row, with the bone needle, 1 stitch 
plain, 3 in the next and repeat; then 6 rows with 
the steel needle, netting the first row through 1 
loop, then through 3; then make 5 rows with the 
bone needle. 

For the center of the back take n loops at each 
side of the center loop, making 23 in all, and work 
the pattern the same as for the part just given, 
except that in the last 2 groups of fine and coarse 
rows, you put 7 rows with the steel needle instead 
of 6, and 6 rows with the bone needle instead of 5. 
Also, after making the 3rd row in the group of 6 
rows with the steel needle, widen 1 stitch in each 
row until you have 33 knots, or until you begin the 
2nd group with the fine needle; then work without 
widening. Sew the center part to the sides with an 
over-and-over stitch, fulling in the sides of the front 
a trifle if necessary, and draw, the center of the 
back into about an -inch and a half space at the 
bottom. 

For the ruching, work across the front edge, using 
the bone needle, and make 2 stitches in every loop, 





No. 20. — Detail of Towel Border. 



No. 



21. — Towel Bordered with Darned or 
Guipure Netting. 



(For Suggestions see No. 10, Page 110.) 

and across the lower edge also put 2 stitches in the 
loops, except where the long stitches come, and 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



1 to 



there put 4 or 5, according to the length of it, to 
make it equally as full as the other part; and across 
the center of the back where it was drawn in, make 
the loops over the drawing thread and through 
several loops at once. Make 5 more rows across 
the front and 6 more across the bottom. Line 
the cap with silk and put ribbon ties at each 
corner. 

Netted Book Cover. 

Nos. 22 and 23. — Make a foundation of 
square netting of the size required, using rope 
silk, or, if preferred, coarse linen thread or cord. 
Then stretch the foundation on a frame and darn 
it as seen in the picture at No. 22 or in any other 
manner preferred. On preceding pages will be 
seen many methods of darning and varieties of 
stitches, any of which could be adapted to this 
cover. 

Now make a cover of linen or satin, fitting it to 
the book, and turning it over on the inside for 
about an inch all round to form a sort of pocket 
for the book. Then fasten the ornamented 
netting over the lining and the cover is complete. 

Netted Watch Pocket. 

No. 24. — This useful little article is quickly 
and easily made. Use crochet cotton for the 
netting and darning, and meshes of 2 sizes. 
Commence across the middle of the back, putting 
on 24 stitches with the larger mesh; net 1 plain 
row, and then work forwards and backwards, 
and decrease by omitting to net the last loop in 
every row until there is only one loop left. Then 
take out the foundation thread and put it farther 
back; net a plain row along the foundation 
stitches, and afterwards decrease by taking 2 
loops together at the end of every row until there 
are 3 loops remaining, and fasten off. The 



engraving. For the front, put 40 stitches on a 
foundation thread with the larger mesh, take the 
other mesh and net 10 plain rows forwards and 






No. 22.— Darnixg 
Book 



Debtoh 

Cover. 



tor Netted 



No. 23. — Netted Book Cover. 



corner that finishes with one loop is the top of the same mesh, net 
pocket; on this darn the little pattern shown in the loops, miss the 
10 



No. 24. — Netted Watch Pocket. 



backwards, then tie the 
foundation thread in a cir- 
cle. Now round this work 
an edge: 

First round. — With the 
other mesh, net 4 stitches 
in one loop, miss the next 
loop, and repeat, and make 
4 stitches in each loop along 
the top, and also 4 stitches 
in the little circle made by 
the foundation thread. 

Second round. — With the 
larger mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each loop of last round. 

Third round.— With 
same mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each of 3 consecutive 
loops, miss the next loop, 
and repeat. 

Fourth round. — With 
1 stitch in each of 2 consecutive 
loop over the loop missed in last 



146 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



round, and repeat. Now darn a zigzag edge up 
and down in the 9th and 10th rows of plain netting, 




;No. 25. — Netted Nightcap. 



and sew this piece on to the back of the pocket. 
Cut a piece of cardboard of the shape of the back 
and of the front piece of netting, cover it on both 
sides with pale blue or crimson silk, and finish off 
with a bow at top and bottom to hang the pocket 
up by. 

Netted Nightcap. 

No. 25. — Knitting cotton No. 8, and meshes of 
2 sizes will be required. Begin with the smaller 
mesh by netting 22 stitches on a foundation thread, 
which tie round in a circle. Work a round of plain 
netting with the same mesh. 

Third round. — With the other mesh, net 5 stitches 
in one loop of last round, miss the next loop, and 
repeat. 

Fourth round. — With the other mesh, plain 
netting. 

Fifth round. — The same as the fourth round. 

Sixth round. — With the other mesh, net 2 stitches 
in every loop of last round. Net 10 plain rounds 
with the smaller mesh. Then leaving 25 loops un- 
worked for the back of the neck, net upon the re- 
maining loops forwards and backwards for 20 rows. 

For the Border. — With larger mesh, net 3 stitches 
in each loop all round the cap, and 5 stitches in 
each loop round each corner. Then do 2 rounds 
of plain netting with smaller mesh, and finish with 



a round thus: Make 1 loop, miss 1 loop, alternately, 
and fasten off. Darn the pattern as shown in the 
engraving round the front of the cap. Run in 
tapes, fasten on strings, and the cap is finished. 

Netted Tab. 

No. 26. — This is in sheaf pattern, with bunches 
of loops, The sheaf pattern is described in No. 17 
on page 112. Make a foundation of as many loops 
as you require for the length of the tab. 

First row. — Plain over a mesh the eighth of an 
inch in width. 

Second row. — Sheaf netting, leaving one of the 
long loops without tying into a sheaf; for the end, 
on one of these loops commence the 3rd row. Work 
over the small mesh, ten stitches into the loop, and 
one stitch into each of the stitches worked with dou- 
ble cotton. Now work the 4th row all round plain. 

Fifth row. — Work in loop netting. 

Sixth row. — Plain. 

Seventh row. — Bunches of loops worked as de- 
scribed elsewhere in this pamphlet. 

Eighth row. — Plain. 

Netted Lappet for Caps, etc. 

(For Illustration see Page 147.) 

No. 27. — This lappet is composed of one section 




No. 26. — Netted Tab. 



of an open work and darned stripe (worked by 
stitches elsewhere shown) edged by a fan pattern. 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



147 



To form the point at the end, tie the cotton into 
the first of the four loops, work one stitch into each 
of the other four stitches, turn, knot the cotton into 
the center of last loop without working over a mesh, 
one stitch over the mesh into each of the three next 
loops, turn, knot the cotton into the first loop in the 
same way as last, one stitch into each of two loops, 
turn, knot the cotton into the first loop, one stitch 
into the next 

Now work a row round both sides and the end. 

First row. — In loop netting, work entirely round 
the end and along the other side. 

Second and Third raws, — Plain netting. 

Fourth ro7c. — Over the larger mesh work one 
stitch into a loop, six stitches into the next loop, 
and repeat. 

Over the small mesh work one stitch into each 
stitch of last row. 

Square for Neck-Handkerchiefs, 
Fichus, etc. 

No. 28. — The square shown is worked with white 
Berlin wool of which 4 to 5 ounces will be required, 
according to the size of the meshes you work with. 
If you wish the wrap to be rather closely netted use 




No. 27.— Netted Lappet for Caps, Etc. 
(For Description see Page 146.) 



flat meshes a quarter-inch and a half-inch wide; if 
preferred more open, let the meshes measure three- 



eighths and three-fourths of an inch in width. 
Commence with the smallest mesh, and put 60 loops 
on a foundation. Work 2 rows of plain netting. 

Third row. — With the large mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each of the first 2 loops, * 6 stitches in the next loop, 
1 stitch in each of 5 consecutive loops, and repeat 
from *; end the row with 3 plain stitches. 

Fourth and Fifth rows. — With the small mesh, 
plain netting, 1 stitch in each loop. 

Sixth row, — With the large mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each loop. 

Seventh rotv.— With the small mesh, net 1 stitch 
in each of the first 2 loops, * gather the next 6 




No. 28. — Section of Square for Neck-Handkerchief, 
Fichus, Ktc. (Fluted Pattern.) 



loops together on the needle, and net them as 1 
stitch; net 1 stitch in each of 5 consecutive loops, 
and repeat from *; and end with 3 plain stitches. 

Eighth roiu. — With small mesh, plain netting. 

Ninth row. — With large mesh, net 1 stitch in each 
of the first 5 loops, * net 6 stitches in the next 
loop, net 1 stitch in each of 5 consecutive loops, 
and repeat from *; there will be 1 mere stitch to 
net plain at the end of the row; the fluted stitches 
in this row should come exactly between the fluted 
stitches of the 3rd row. 

Tenth and Eleventh roivs. — With small mesh, plain 
netting. 

Twelfth row. — With large mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each loop. 

Thirteenth roiv. — With small mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each of the first 5 loops, * gather the next 6 loops 
together on the needle and net them as 1 stitch, net 
5 consecutive loops, and repeat from *; there will 
be 1 more stitch to net at the end of the row. 

Fourteenth ro7c — With small mesh, plain netting. 



148 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Repeat from the 3rd row 5 times, and leave off after 
completing the 8th row. 

For the Border: First round. — With the large 
mesh, net 8 stitches in 1 loop, miss the next loop, 
and repeat. 

Second round. — With small mesh, net 1 stitch in 
each loop; net 1 or 2 extra stitches at the corners 
to ensure the necessary fulness. 

Third round. — With small mesh, miss the first 
loop of the group of last round, net r stitch in each 
of the 3 next loops, miss the next, net 1 stitch in 
each of the 3 next, and repeat. 

Fourth round. — Miss the loop over the loop 
missed in last round, net 1 stitch in each of the 2 
next loops, miss the loop over the loop missed in 



the 2nd; this crosses the loops. Continue thus 
across the row. 

Fifth row. — Use the large mesh, and net plain. 

Sixth row. — Like the 4th row. 

Seventh row. — Use the large mesh and net plain, 
except at the corners, where you net 6 stitches into 
1 loop; now break the thread. 

Eighth row. — Use the large mesh, and double the 
thread; begin at the top of left-hand corner, and 
net 2 stitches in each loop. 

Ninth rmv. — Use the small mesh and net (with 
the single thread) through 4 loops at once. 

Tenth row. — Use the large mesh and net plain. 

Eleventh row. — The same as 4th row. 

Twelfth row. — Use the small mesh and net 4 




No. 29.— Section of Netted Collar 



last round, net 1 stitch in each of the 2 next, and 
repeat. 

Directions for Half of Netted Collar. 

No. 29. — This collar is shown made of very fine 
thread, and 2 sizes of mesh-sticks are used. 

First row. — Net 38 stitches over the foundation 
loop with the thread double, using the large 
„mesh. 

Second row. — Use the small mesh with the thread 
single, and net through every loop that may be 
formed by separating the threads which were 
doubled in the 1st row. 

Third row. — Use the large mesh, and net 1 stitch 
in each loop. 

Fourth row. — Use the small mesh and draw the 
1st loop through the 2nd, then the 2nd through the 
1st; then work through the 1st loop, then through 



plain loops, then in the 5th loop put 14 stitches, 
which forms the shell; * net 3 plain loops, then 14 
stitches in the next loop, and repeat from * across 
the row. 

Thirteenth to Twenty-second ro7e> inclusive. — Use 
the small mesh and net plain. 

Twenty-third row. — Use the same mesh, and net 
22 stitches, then through 10 loops at once; then net 
* 5 plain, through 10 at once, and repeat from *. 

Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth rows. — Use the 
same mesh and net plain. 

Twenty-sixth row. — Use the large mesh and net 
plain. 

Twenty-seventh roiu. — Same as 4th row. 

Twenty-eighth row. — Use the large mesh and the 
thread double, then net 1 stitch in each of 3 loops, 
then 6 stitches in the next one, and repeat across 
the row. 

Twenty-ninth rcnv. — Use the small mesh and 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



149 



single thread; net through the 3 double-thread 
loops which come between the group of 6 stitches, 
at one time; then, separating the threads, net 
through every loop in the group of 6, and so con- 
tinue across the row. 

Thirtieth row. — Break the thread which formed 
the foundation loop, then run a thread through the 
10th row and tie to hold the 
work by; now tie the working 
thread in the first loop of the 
first row made, and, using the 
small mesh, work 1 row, work- 
ing through 2 loops at once; 
this completes the collar. This 
gives only one-half of the col- 
lar; therefore, in starting it, 
double the number of stitches 
directed for the first row, and 
finish off the other end to cor- 
respond with the end given. 
These details form a very dainty 
collar. 

Netted Neckerchief. 

No. 30. — About two ounces 
of black silk, a coarse knitting 
needle No. 12, and a half-inch 
wide mesh will be required in 
making this article. 

Begin the neckerchief in the 
center from point to point upon a foundation of 
112 stitches, working over the smaller mesh two plain 
rows, but do not work the last stitch of each row. 

Third nnc: — Work over the large mesh with 
double stitch one stitch in each loop except the 
last; do not work that. 

Fourth rmc. — With the small mesh and single 
silk work one stitch into each long loop, twisting 
the loops once or twice as you make each; con- 
tinue to repeat from the second row until you 
have worked eight repeats of the pattern; take 



First round. — Over the small mesh net one stitch 
into each stitch of foundation, except in the stitch 
at each end of the first row; in these work two 
stitches. 

Second round. — Like first round. 

Third round. — Over the large mesh work four 
stitches into one stitch of previous round, pass 




No. 31.- 
and make 




No. 30. — Netted Neckerchief. 



the work from the foundation, pick out the knots, 
run a thread through the second row, and work 
upon the first row; for the second half work as 
described for the first, commencing with the row 
of long twisted loops. 

For the Border : — Work in the following manner: 



No. 31. — Netted Scollop for Scarfs, Etc 



over one stitch. Repeat all round the work. 

Fourth and Fifth rounds. — Over the small mesh, 
one stitch into each stitch of last round. 

Sixth round. — Like third round. 

Seventh round. — With double silk one stitch into 
each stitch of last round. 

Netted Scollop for Scarfs, Etc. 

-Use a coarse bone needle for the mesh, 

12 stitches over the foundation loop; 

then with the same mesh, make 1 

row, putting 2 stitches into every 

loop. Next, work 3 rows, using a 

coarse steel needle for the mesh ; then, 

1 row with the bone mesh, and 1 row 

with the steel mesh. Next, use the 

bone mesh, and work through 2 loops 

at once, then, with the same mesh, 

put 3 stitches in every loop. Now 

use a little smaller bone needle for 

the mesh, and make 1 row, then 2 

rows with the steel, and r row with 

the bone; then use a one-fourth inch 

mesh and make * 1 in the first loop, 

7 in the next, and repeat from *. 

Last row. — Use the steel mesh and 

work in every loop. The scollop is 

then drawn up into place and tied tightly. Make 

a row of single crochets across the top to form a 

firm edge-finish. If desired, a series of these 

scollops may be made and joined to form an 

edging that will prove suitable for trimming 

underclothing, or children's gowns and skirts. 



150 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



Letter Box. 

Nos. 32 TO 35. — This pretty and convenient box 
is designed to be hung on the wall in the sitting- 
room or, library, in order to hold letters that accum- 
ulate rapidly. Unanswered letters are kept in the 
box at the top, and those already answered are 

dropped through a 
slit in the bottom, 
and fall into the net 
below. A cigar box 
seven inches long, 
five inches wide, and 
three inches high 
serves as a founda- 
tion for the one il- 
lustrated. A slit 
five inches long and 





No. 32. — Letter Box. 



No. 33.— Cross- 
Front 



using a fine steel netting needle and 2 steel knitting 
needles, No. 14 and No. 7, for meshes. Begin with 
No. 14 mesh, making 40 stitches on a foundation 
for the top of the nand, and join round. Net 9 
plain rounds. 

Tenth round. — With the same mesh, net 1 stitch 
in each of 4 consecutive loops, 3 stitches in the 
next loop, and repeat; this is "looped " netting, and 
the additional loops form little picots and are not 
to be worked into. 

Eleventh round. — Net 1 stitch in each of 3 con- 
secutive loops, 3 stitches in the next loop, 1 in each 
of the next 3, and 3 stitches in the next loop, and 
repeat. 

Twelfth round. — Net 1 stitch in each of 4 con- 
secutive loops, 3 stitches in the next loop, and repeat. 
Repeat these 3 rows of looped netting twice. 

round. — With No. 7 mesh, plain. 
Twentieth round. — With 
No. 14 mesh, draw the 1st 
loop of previous round up- 
wards through the 2nd loop 
of the same round, and net 
a stitch in it, then look 
through the 1st loop, the 
upper part of which is now 
secured in the knot you have 
just formed, and you will see 
a portion of the 2nd loop 
crossing along just below; 
draw this part of the 2nd 



Nineteenth 



jguxryt 

uaBrli 



Stitch Design 
of Box. 



for 



half an inch wide is cut in the bottom, and the 
inside is lined with olive colored satteen; the satteen 
is first pasted on stiff paper, which is then pasted 
into the box after the edges have been bound with a 
narrow strip of the same material. The outside is 
faced with 6cru canvas, and ornamented with em- 
broidery (see designs given at Nos. ^^, 34 and 35). 
No. 34 gives the design for the lid, and No. 35 that 
for the end, while for the front, No. 34 is repeated 
in the manner shown at No. 33. The cross 
stitches are worked in olive zephyr wool, and the 
front and sides of the net are ornamented with 
crochet rosettes made as follows: They are worked 
with olive zephyr wool on a small brass ring as a 
foundation; in the first round twenty-eight double 
crochet are worked around the ring, and then closed 
with a slip stitch, and in the second, scollops com- 
posed of five chain stitches are worked at regular in- 
tervals. Long chain stitches in red silk are worked 
on the surface, and a brass button is placed over 
the opening at the center. The upper edge is 
finished with a narrow crochet border fastened 
down with red silk. Worsted balls complete the 
work as illustrated. The box is provided with a 
small brass lock on the front, and with eyes to hang 
it by at the back. 

Netted Mitt. 

(For Illustration see Page 151.) 
No. 36. — This mitt is worked with machine silk, 




loop up through 
the little opening 
under the knot, 
and net a stitch 
in it; entwine 
every 2 loops to- 
gether in the 
same manner to 
the end of the 
round. This, 
with the previ- 
ous round, forms 
Grecian netting. 

Tiventy-first round. — Plain 
netting. Repeat the 3 
rounds of looped netting 3 
times. Now cast on to an- 
other foundation, 15 stitches 
for the thumb; net 1 plain 
round; then work the 3 
rounds of looped netting 3 
times. Join this to the mit- 
ten by netting 4 stitches of 
the thumb onto 4 stitches of 
the inside of the mitten; 
then continue round the 
mitten and round the thumb 
rounds of Grecian netting. 

Next round. — Plain. Repeat the 3 
looped netting 3 times, decreasing 2 



No. 34. — Cross-Stitch Design for 
Lid of Box. 



'. jSc . . r:tS 

JHTtSW- ...: ■:.: 

~»s&. s Mr*?: a 

• -MUST, a . 

;,; *wr- ........... 



No. 35.— Cross-Stitch 

Design for End 

of Box 



both. Make 2 



rounds of 
stitches in 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



151 



each round, at each side of the thumb, by taking 2 
loops together as 1 stitch. Make 2 rounds of 
Grecian netting. 

Next round. — Plain. Repeat the 3 rounds of 
looped netting 3 times, and increase 1 stitch in the 
inside of the hand in each round. Make 2 rounds 
of Grecian netting. 

Next round. — Plain. Repeat the 3 rounds of 
looped netting 3 times, with neither decrease nor 
increase. Make the 2 rounds of Grecian netting. 

Next round. — Plain. Repeat 3 rounds of looped 
netting 3 times, increasing 3 stitches in each of 
last 2 rounds. Make the 2 rounds of Grecian netting. 

Next round. — Plain. Repeat the 3 rounds of 
looped netting 3 times. 

For the Border: First round. — Use No. 7 mesh 
and work 2 stitches into each loop. 

Seeond round. — With No. 14 mesh, take up every 
2 loops together and net them as 1 stitch. 

Third round. — With the same mesh, plain netting. 

Fourth round. — With No. 7 mesh, miss the first 
loop, net 6 stitches in the next loop, miss the next, 
net 1 stitch in the next, and continue thus alter- 
nately 6 stitches and 1 stitch in every other loop. 

Fifth and Sixth rounds. — With No. 14 mesh, plain. 




No. 36. — Netted Mitten. 
(For Description see Page 150.) 



Work the same border round the top of the 
mitten and round the thumb. Net the other mitt 
to correspond. 

Netted Seine. 

No. 37. — This consists of a deep, pointed bag of 
circular netting distended with three hoops, and a 
small pointed bag open at the bottom and held out 
by a hoop at the top. The top of the larger bag is 
fastened to the sides of the smaller one half way 



up (see picture), and the bottom of the smaller bag 
is held in place inside the larger bag by cords. 

Bag for Holding Tennis Balls. 

(No Illustration.) 

This should be netted with twine; that made in 
variegated colors is the prettiest. A half-inch fiat 




No. 37. — Netted Seine. 

mesh, and also a one and a half-inch mesh will be 
required. 

Commence by making 12 stitches with the large 
mesh on a foundation string, and join round. 
Begin with the half-inch mesh. 

First round. — Net 2 stitches in the first loop, 1 
stitch in the next loop, and repeat. 

Second round. — Net 2 stitches in the first loop, 1 
stitch in each of the next 2 loops, and repeat. 

Third round. — Net 2 stitches in the first loop, 1 
stitch in each of the next 3 loops, and repeat. Con- 
tinue netting round and round in this manner mak- 
ing each time one stitch more between the increase 
(which occurs six times in the round and always in 
the loop which appears as if drawn longways) until 
the bag is as large round as you wish; then work 
round and round without any increase until the 
netting measures about 17 inches from the com- 
mencement. Now net 1 round plain with the large 
mesh in which to run the scarlet inch-wide braid 
to draw up the mouth of the bag; net 6 more rounds 
with the half-inch mesh, and fasten off. 

Netted Silk Purse. 

(No Illustration.) 

Long silk purses are popular, and a simple one 



152 



TATTING AND NETTING. 



worked entirely in plain netting forms a nice present 
for a gentleman. 

Procure 3 skeins of crimson and 2 skeins of gold- 
colored medium-sized silk, and a round steel knit- 



rows with the crimson, and continue the two colors 
thus alternately till you have made about five and a 
half inches, ending with 3 crimson rows. Fold the 
netting and join one-third of the length above each 



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No. 38. — Design for Towel Border in Guipure Netting. 
(Fur Suggestions see No. 10 Page 110.) 



ting needle No. 12, for a mesh. Begin with the 
crimson silk, and for the length of the purse put 86 
stitches on a foundation; work 3 rows of plain net- 
ting. Then work 4 rows with the gold silk and 6 



end and gather up the ends; strengthen round the 
opening of the purse with a row of chain and single 
crochet. Add rings and tassels. If desired the 
purse may be made of black silk and prettily beaded. 



STERLING t. I HANCINI CLARK ART INSTITUTE 

NK9400 B88I stack 

Butterick Publishing/Tatting and netting 




3 1962 00079 1172